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Polling Places

NEWS
October 7, 1986 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Spurred by a 1984 federal law, the Pennsylvania State Department has been prodding county election boards for nearly two years to shift voting locations and remove architectural barriers to ensure handicapped and elderly voters access to polling places. In fact, Secretary of State Robert A. Gleason Jr. announced last week that nearly 60 percent of the state's 9,539 polling places were accessible to the handicapped and elderly. But there remains a good chance that wheelchair-bound voters will not be able to cast their ballots.
NEWS
April 17, 2009 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department has settled with Philadelphia on a plan to improve access to polling places for the disabled, the agency announced yesterday. "This agreement will help ensure that persons with mobility disabilities have the opportunity to exercise their right and cast their ballot in person, at the polls, near their homes and alongside their neighbors," said Loretta King, acting assistant attorney general for the Civil Rights Division. The Justice Department said the settlement was the first between the agency and a city that focused solely on polling-place accessibility.
NEWS
May 28, 2010 | By MICHELLE SKOWRONEK, skowrom@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
Jonathan Ramos, who challenged state Rep. Angel Cruz in last week's Democratic primary for his 180th District seat, is asking for an investigation into Cruz's Election Day behavior. "I'm not looking for a recount," Ramos said at a news conference, surrounded by more than 30 supporters. "It's not about me anymore. I just want this injustice to end for the community. " Common Pleas Judge Dennis P. Cohen issued an injunction against Cruz on Election Day for allegedly intimidating voters and blocking some election workers' access to polling places.
NEWS
April 23, 1986 | By MARIA GALLAGHER, Daily News Staff Writer
State House candidate Vincent Hughes usually spends his mornings shaking hands at transit stops, knocking on doors or working at his campaign office on Chestnut Street near 52nd. On Monday, he found himself in a City Hall Annex courtroom. Hughes, who is trying to unseat state Rep. James D. Barber in the 190th District, was arraigned on charges of violating the state election code by visiting two 44th Ward polling places last Nov. 5. A June 30 trial date was scheduled in Municipal Court.
NEWS
February 16, 1996 | By Rebecca Goldsmith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A last-minute effort to revise a law that could send the price of school board elections skyrocketing got a shot in the arm yesterday when the Assembly Education Committee unanimously approved a measure designed to repair some of its most troublesome provisions. The law, enacted in December, was designed to make school board elections more professional and uniform by putting them under the same state laws that govern the conduct of general elections. As such, responsibility for school board elections would be transferred from the school districts to the counties.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | By Gloria Campisi and Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writer Joseph P. Blake contributed to this report
When the polls opened in Philadelphia at 7 a.m. yesterday, 49 polling places throughout the city didn't have voting machines. Although the machines eventually were delivered - in some cases more than five hours late - the delays kept many people from voting, and for a time threatened to throw the entire election into confusion. The city's Democratic Party went to court in an effort to keep the 49 polling places open past 8 p.m. to make up for lost time. The Republican Party fought to close the polls as scheduled, and the court battle lasted through the day and into the evening.
NEWS
May 12, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Acting on a request from state and city officials, city schools will open two hours late next Tuesday, May 18, Pennsylvania's primary election day. School Reform Commission Chairman Robert L. Archie Jr. made the announcement at Wednesday's meeting. Archie said that Gov. Rendell and Pamela Pryor Dembe, president judge of the Court of Common Pleas, had asked the commission "to make accomodations for the expected heavy voter turnout. " Initially, the district had scheduled the day as an in-service day when teachers would attend but students would not. But a harsh winter and a number of snow days caused the district to amend its calendar, eating into spring break, extending the school year, and turning primary day into a full student day. The decision angered many city officials, who said they feared for students' safety as many schools are polling places.
NEWS
April 23, 1986 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Faye D. White-Hall, a Democratic candidate for the state House, did not collect enough valid signatures on her nominating petition to run for office, a Commonwealth Court judge ruled yesterday, ordering her out of the race for the West Philadelphia district. White-Hall's candidacy for the 192d District nomination had been challenged by Rep. Chaka Fattah. Judge Joseph T. Doyle ruled that 86 of 340 signatures on White-Hall's nominating petition were not valid, leaving her 46 signatures short of the required 300. Doyle ruled that most of the 86 signatures were forged or were ineligible because the signers were not registered Democrats in the district.
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