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NEWS
October 28, 1992 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Go ahead, pick a number. Bill Clinton leads by 12 points, or 11 points, or 10 points, or eight points, or seven points, although it may be as many as 19 or as few as five. Who knows for sure? Not the poll takers, and certainly not the voters. Less than a week before Election Day, America is drowning in numbers. "This is the worst orgy of polling in American history," declares Larry Sabato, a political analyst at the University of Virginia who has written extensively about media behavior.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
A majority of Americans think Lt. Col. Oliver L. North and his former boss, Rear Adm. John Poindexter, deserve presidential pardons to make sure they don't go to jail, according to an ABC News-Washington Post poll. Sixty-one percent said North should get a pardon now and 6 percent more said he should get one if charged with a crime. Thirty percent opposed a pardon for the fired White House aide. Forty-six percent said Poindexter, the former national security adviser, should get a pardon now and 8 percent more said he should get one if charged.
SPORTS
October 24, 1988 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
So far, logic and sentiment haven't been enough to move the NCAA's deep thinkers to stop bowing to the wishes of bowl committees and institute a playoff system for Division I-A football. And that's too bad, because without a playoff system to determine a champion on the field, teams play to impress the voters in the two wire- service polls, which determine a mythical national champion. As a result, college football is often embarrassed by games such as Florida State's savage 66-3 beating of Louisiana Tech on Saturday in Tallahassee.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | By Inga Saffron and Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Over the course of last month's New York primary, the presidential contenders breakfasted on buttered bialys, gorged on creamy cannoli, crunched kosher dills, devoured dishes of yellow rice and fried plantains, sipped cups of cappuccino and polished off pierogi - all in the name of courting the ethnic vote. But if the political pollsters are right, the menu for the New Jersey primary will be far less varied. Although typically viewed as a spicy ethnic hash, the state's voters are an increasingly homogenous bunch, said Cliff Zukin, the director of the Eagleton Institute's Center for Public Interest Polling, a part of Rutgers University in New Brunswick.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | By Marc Gunther, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Who needs the election? Newsweek magazine, Sam Donaldson of ABC News, the regulars on The McLaughlin Group and assorted newspaper analysts have all but declared victory for Bill Clinton. "I don't think there's any reporter covering this candidate who doesn't think it's over," said National Public Radio's Mara Liasson, who has been covering Clinton. But exasperated media critics - not to mention supporters of President Bush - say the press is wrong if it treats the election as though the outcome is known in advance.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | By Carl M. Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Public opinion polls have fluctuated so dramatically in the 1992 election year that the term scientific poll may be in jeopardy. Presidential nominees normally get a "bounce" from their summer conventions. But no bounce can explain President Bush's pulling nearly even with Bill Clinton on Aug. 20, the last day of the Republican convention, and trailing by 15 points five days later. Can the voters of 1992 possibly be that fickle? Or are the polls that unreliable? "Some of both is the truth," political pollster Geoffrey Garin said.
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Democratic state House candidate Chuck Bolig filed two lawsuits this week against a polling firm employed by Republican Eugene F. McGill, his opponent in the 151st District. In the suits, Bolig alleges that he was defamed as the result of a poll the firm conducted. At the heart of the dispute is a question Bolig says pollsters from Precision Marketing Inc. of Easton, Pa., asked voters in the legislative district this month. According to Bolig, pollsters asked voters whether their opinion of Bolig would change if they knew that he had missed 75 percent of the meetings of the Upper Dublin Board of Commissioners, of which he has been a member for the last seven years.
NEWS
October 20, 2004 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jennifer Malivuk says she'll probably vote next month. A Pittsburgh native, the University of Pennsylvania senior is undecided but is leaning toward President Bush. Pollsters would surely be interested in the opinion of someone like Malivuk, an undecided voter in a swing state. But there is no chance they will ever talk to her. She's a cord-cutter. That's the telephone-industry term for the as many as 6 percent of Americans who have a cellular phone but no traditional phone with a cord.
NEWS
January 27, 1998 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Bill Clinton is down in the polls, but not out. The president's recent national public-opinion poll ratings, comparatively robust thanks to the strongest economy in a generation, have been heading south since the furor broke over his alleged sexual affair with a former White House intern. One poll found the share of Americans who say they have positive feelings about Clinton dropped to 40 percent from 57 percent in just one week. But his overall favorability and performance ratings are nowhere near the lowest in his presidential roller-coaster ride, pollsters noted yesterday.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're sniping at each other on the campaign trail, quibbling over the most basic numbers, and at times it seems they can't agree on anything. But this isn't about Al Gore and George W. Bush. This is about the pollsters who are tracking public sentiment in the presidential race. What's a political consumer supposed to think? Last week, Gallup's daily poll of likely voters nationwide showed Gore on top by as much as 10 points, while the bipartisan Battleground poll had Bush ahead by as much as 6 points.
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NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
WEST LONG BRANCH, N.J. - Gov. Christie isn't the only one gearing up for a presidential campaign. Over a recent nine-day span, Monmouth University pollster Patrick Murray, whose work is usually confined to New Jersey, released surveys of voters in six states where Tuesday's midterm elections could swing control of the U.S. Senate to Republicans for President Obama's last two years in office. Murray says the polling blitz - of Kansas, Colorado, Iowa, North Carolina, South Dakota, and Georgia, on top of 11 other surveys he released in October - presents a challenge that will test his models.
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Matt Katz and Joelle Farrell, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
President Obama holds a 10-point lead over challenger Mitt Romney in the latest Inquirer poll of likely New Jersey presidential voters, indicating that he will win the state but fall short of his 16-point margin of victory in the state in 2008. The Inquirer New Jersey Poll, conducted Tuesday through Thursday, with less than two weeks to go before the election, could reflect a decline in enthusiasm for Obama nationally compared with four years ago, when he became the first African American president by running on a platform of change.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Matt Katz and Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
President Obama holds a 10-point lead over challenger Mitt Romney in the latest Inquirer poll of likely New Jersey presidential voters, indicating that he will win the state but fall short of his 16-point margin of victory in the state in 2008. The Inquirer New Jersey Poll, conducted Tuesday through Thursday, with less than two weeks to go before the election, could reflect a decline in enthusiasm for Obama nationally compared with four years ago, when he became the first African American president by running on a platform of change.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
One poll found that Pennsylvania voters were more likely to vote for President Obama than for Mitt Romney by an eight-point margin. Another survey - taken about the same time, just after the candidates' first debate - showed Romney just one point behind. The reason for the disparity? It all comes down to predicting who will show up at the polls on Nov. 6 - a task made increasingly difficult by the cellphone. "We kind of hold our breaths every election cycle to see if our methods are still holding up," said Chris Borick, director of the Institute of Public Opinion at Muhlenberg College in Allentown.
SPORTS
October 12, 2012 | By David Murphy, Daily News Staff Writer
I RECENTLY discovered the weekly NFL power rankings that handicapper Dave Tuley compiles for ESPN.com. Essentially, Tuley and two other gamblers use their own proprietary formula to assign a value to each team. Those values are then combined and weighted so that they resemble NFL scores. Tuley uses these power ratings to compare the relative strengths of two teams against the spread that Vegas has created for their game. For example, the Falcons are tied for sixth in the rankings with 24 points, while the Raiders are 29th at 16 points.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
By Doyle McManus Do you know how you'll vote in November's presidential election? I thought so. For all we're hearing about the importance of undecided voters, there aren't many of them left. In an ABC News/Washington Post poll released recently, for example, only 2 percent of voters said they couldn't predict how they would vote on Election Day. That's right: 2 percent. Other polls report higher shares of undecideds, partly because they don't press respondents as hard to make a choice, but no one is putting the undecided vote at more than 10 percent.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | By Dusan Stojanovic, Associated Press
BELGRADE, Serbia - A pro-European Union candidate and a nationalist opponent are headed for a runoff in Serbia's presidential elections, while the ruling pro-Western party is likely to form the next coalition government, independent pollsters said Sunday. The Center for Free Elections and Democracy said its unofficial complete count showed the previous president, Boris Tadic of the Democratic Party, taking 26.7 percent of the votes, while populist Serbian Progressive Party leader Tomislav Nikolic has 25.5 percent.
NEWS
April 3, 2012
F ORMER U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum , with his big lead in the Pennsylvania presidential primary all but vanishing with three weeks to go, lashed out at the Daily News pollster on a news show Sunday morning and then, on a second show, misled viewers about the pollster's work. "Fox News Sunday" host Chris Wallace noted that Santorum's lead over former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney in Pennsylvania dropped from 29 percentage points in February to a mere 2 points last week in the Franklin & Marshall/ Daily News poll.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
WITH ONE of the best-known names in Pennsylvania politics, Bob Casey Jr. easily won a seat in the U.S. Senate six years ago during a referendum election on an unpopular Republican president. But a poll being released today shows that more than half the state's registered voters don't know enough about Casey to offer an opinion or are undecided about the Democrat's performance as he seeks a second term. Will President Obama's re-election effort, sure to make many stops in Pennsylvania this year, help or hurt Casey's effort?
NEWS
November 24, 2011
George Gallup Jr., 81, who led the firm that his father made all but synonymous with polling and expanded it to become a barometer of Americans' views on religion as well as their political attitudes, died Monday of liver cancer in Princeton. Mr. Gallup had once considered becoming an Episcopal priest, and after graduating from Princeton University with a degree in religion in 1953, he went to Texas to work in a ministry on Galveston Island. But the pull of the family enterprise proved stronger, and he joined his older brother, Alec, at his father's firm, serving as an executive from the mid-1950s until retirement in 2004.
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