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Pollution

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NEWS
August 3, 1994 | GEORGE MILLER/ DAILY NEWS
The Grim Reaper, dressed in the dark robe of death, walks around the chalk- outlined bodies of 75 protesters sprawled across the sidewalk in front of the Sun Co. building at 18th and Market streets yesterday. Pretending to be corpses, the demonstrators held signs to their chests in protest of any changes to ease laws enacted to reduce air pollution
NEWS
June 25, 2004
How foolish of me that to think the news media would report the news as unbiased. I have canceled my subscription to Time magazine due to their anti-Catholic reporting. I no longer read the New York Times because of the biased articles. Now it will be impossible to read the Daily News knowing that they have taken a position on a political candidate. The day will come when abuse of this type will come under closer scrutiny, but until then I guess I'll read whatever comes to print that's not trying to pollute my thoughts and the way I vote.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | BY RAMONA SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
When the sun comes up on Tulpehocken Street, the well-worn buckets are already waiting on the curb. Cans and bottles. Bundled newspapers. Weekly offerings from a neighborhood of recyclers in a city where most of the trash still goes to waste. "I'm into it now," says Joan Fuller, a longtime resident of the West Oak Lane neighborhood that was one of the first to be required by the city to separate its trash. "You get in the habit of getting up and going to work every day, so get in the habit of recycling every day," she said.
NEWS
July 28, 1999 | by Scott Heimer , Daily News Staff Writer
Don't ask Christine Fisher for an endorsement of the alleged pollution-killing wonders of MTBE, the winter-time gasoline additive used in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The drinking-water well at her home in Blue Bell, Montgomery County, was poisoned by the stuff. Don't ask Ross D'Bono, executive director of the Pennsylvania Gasoline Retail Association & Allied Trades in Northeast Philadelphia. Many of the 600 service station dealer-members of his organization reported getting sick from the smell of the stuff and took similar complaints from customers at self-serve islands.
NEWS
March 7, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The team holding an environmental microscope to South and Southwest Philadelphia thought it had pulled off a coup when it scrounged up six more air-pollution measuring devices in a tight budget year. That was before community activists began clamoring for more monitors. At a contentious meeting yesterday with representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency, activists each told why their neighborhood needed a monitor most. "We're all fighting each other for the most contaminated neighborhood - the most pollution," said Gloria Inverso, whose Italian Market area likely will get a monitor because of its numerous auto body shops.
NEWS
April 28, 1986
Several significant facts were overlooked in the April 6 article "Illnesses caused by 'sick buildings,' " by Sally Squires of the Washington Post. Symptoms that disappear upon leaving the workplace would not likely be caused by bacteria or viruses, as emphasized in the article. What was not mentioned was the role played by air pollution of another kind - the buildup of chemicals in the indoor environment. Levels of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde, for example, may be present at higher levels indoors than what would be found outdoors.
NEWS
January 12, 1988 | By Howard Kunreuther
Environmental disasters, such as the million-gallon oil spill near Pittsburgh, can have devastating effects on the air, water and soil. In extreme cases, such as Bhopal, India, thousands of people can be killed or injured. Usually, insurance is available to cover the damage caused by these sudden and accidental occurrences. There is, however, another crisis threatening the environment that most people are unaware of: Insurance for gradual pollution damage has become virtually nonexistent.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | By William H. Sokolic, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Cathy DeStefano and Bonnie Mercadante spent yesterday morning painting the town blue. DeStefano and Mercadante, members of the local Beach Babies Mothers Club, joined a dozen fellow volunteers painting blue fish on storm drains along center city streets. Working under cloudy and sometimes drizzling skies, they put the first touches on a campaign designed to help people realize that what goes down the storm drain winds up in the ocean - and pollutes the water. Pollution - including lawn fertilizers, dog feces, motor oil, detergent, and litter - enters the ocean and bay after washing into the storm drains, particularly after a heavy rainfall.
NEWS
July 8, 1997
People in South and Southwest Philadelphia have long worried about the impact of pollution on their lives, with good reason: Their neighborhoods are dotted with trash transfer stations, sewage plants, refineries, businesses that emit toxic releases and even a Superfund site. After years of demanding an environmental study, they finally got one. But as Daily News staff writer Ramona Smith reported yesterday, the results are both frightening and scientifically inconclusive. Conducted by Johns Hopkins University the study found that people living in a 26-square-mile area face an elevated risk of developing cancer, respiratory ailments and other health problems.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
By 1995, Pennsylvania motorists will face the toughest auto emission standards in the nation, and businesses that pollute will face stiff fees and fines, under a program announced by the Casey administration yesterday. The program would also impose tougher standards on gasoline pumps and on gas itself. The measures are part of Casey's plan to implement the new federal Clean Air Act in Pennsylvania. If the state fails to meet the act's standards, the federal government could withhold up to $600 million for highways or prohibit federal funds for economic development.
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NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
An industrial complex and a former factory were the sources of pollutants found this week in a Montgomery County creek that was the site of an illegal discharge earlier this month, officials said Friday. The pollution found in Tookany Creek in Cheltenham Township originated from SPS Technologies Inc.'s industrial complex, in neighboring Abington Township, and from the oldest building in Wyncote Commons, a former factory site in Cheltenham, said Bryan Havir, Cheltenham's township manager.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Convicted criminals and individuals with ties to organized crime have dumped tons of contaminated soil and construction debris near residential areas and waterways in New Jersey in recent years, enabled by gaping loopholes in state regulations, investigators say. The scheme stretches across the state, from Palmyra to Newark, according to the State Commission of Investigation, which held a three-hour hearing on the matter Wednesday at the...
NEWS
April 29, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN AIR Foul school buses Buying emissions-free electric buses will help clean up the air in Philadelphia and make our city more livable ("SEPTA gets grant to add 25 electric buses next year," April 20). It's a huge step in the right direction. But since there are about 480,000 school buses on the road in the United States, are we also funding school transportation system efforts to reduce that source of pollution? What happens to old buses that are being replaced? Are they being dismantled and recycled, or are they being sold so they can continue to belch diesel fumes outside of our city and state?
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Just how clean - or dirty - is the air we're breathing? For 17 years, the American Lung Association has been issuing State of the Air, an annual report card on the air of the nation's major metropolitan areas. It focuses on two common pollutants: ozone and particulate matter. The latest report, based on air monitor readings and other data from 2012 through 2014, was released Thursday. The news for our region - including Southeastern Pennsylvania and portions of central and South Jersey - was both good and bad. In short, the air quality is improving, but it's still not good enough.
NEWS
April 22, 2016
By John Hanger Bernie Sanders is airing a new television advertisement titled "Ban Fracking Everywhere," a siren song for the 51 percent of Americans who don't support shale-gas production. But Sanders' fracking ban would paradoxically increase pollution and cause devastating utility bill increases for 400,000 Philadelphians with incomes near or below the poverty line. As concerns about fracking mount, many believe the senator when he thunders that a ban is the right thing to do. In an ideal world, it would be, because gas drilling is an industrial process that cannot be done without causing some damage to the environment.
NEWS
March 5, 2016
By Matt Zencey What if Congress could slash the greenhouse gas pollution that's fueling climate chaos around the world, and do so in a way that actually leaves the majority of American households with more money to spend and creates more jobs? You'd say - hey, Congress, you ought to take a hard look at that. Fortunately, it's not a hypothetical question. One way for Congress to deal with the climate crisis is a policy known as "carbon fee and dividend. " This idea starts with a simple fact of economics: If you want less of something - like the greenhouse-gas pollution that's caused when fuels are burned - you raise the price of it. Right now, energy companies get a huge subsidy for their polluting ways because they don't have to pay for the privilege of filling our skies with the carbon-based greenhouse gases that are disrupting the world's climate, raising sea level, and causing harmful changes in the ocean's basic chemistry.
NEWS
February 12, 2016
THE SUPREME Court's order late Tuesday halting President Obama's Clean Power Plan is frustratingly opaque. The terse ruling offers no hints about why the court took the unusual step of pausing Obama's important new regulations - which would have significantly curtailed emissions from the nations' coal-fired electric plants - before a lower court had ruled on their legality. The justices may be sending the president a message about his expansive use of executive authority. Or the court may be trying to avoid a repeat of last summer's Michigan v. EPA ruling, in which most of the nation's power plants were already far along the path to compliance before the court got around to striking down the regulations that had been challenged.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Earlier this year, Kenneth and Lorryn Calicchio bought a 2015 Volkswagen Jetta from Toms River Volkswagen, thinking its diesel engine met federal air quality standards. But the couple learned that VW engineers had installed software that activated pollution controls only during emissions tests. The rest of the time, the car emitted as much as 40 times the pollutants permitted under federal clean air standards. So much for their dream of owning an eco-friendly car. Now the Calicchios have joined thousands of other VW owners in filing about 300 proposed class-action lawsuits nationwide, alleging they were tricked into buying cars the company said were good for the environment but instead spewed pollutants.
NEWS
August 19, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware County agency responsible for treating sewage from systems that serve 500,000 area residents has agreed to pay nearly $1.4 million to settle a claim it let pollutants seep into Ridley Creek, Chester Creek, and the Delaware River. In a lawsuit filed last month, the Delaware County Regional Water Authority was accused of too often letting untreated wastewater flow into the tributaries, endangering residents of Delaware County and parts of Chester County, many of whom live in low-income communities.
NEWS
July 15, 2015
ISSUE | PUBLIC ART Casino project should be community-based It is an interesting idea that SugarHouse Casino would seek permission from the Art Commission to use the filmmaking talents of Sam Katz to satisfy the casino's public art requirement ("SugarHouse seeking a new spin on public art," July 2). Certainly the accomplishments of Katz's company in making documentaries connected to our region makes it a great choice if this endeavor moves forward. However, maybe a daily film on the property crime in Fishtown and Northern Liberties would have more societal benefits.
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