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Polly Klaas

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NEWS
October 22, 1996 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suddenly, a new kind of political ad is hitting the nation's television screens: ads featuring celebrity crime victims. President Clinton has issued two in the last week, and Rep. Dick Zimmer is using one in the vituperative U.S. Senate race in New Jersey. The Clinton ads feature Marc Klaas, the father of 12-year-old murder victim Polly Klaas, and James Brady, Ronald Reagan's former press secretary who was shot and paralyzed during the 1981 assassination attempt on Reagan.
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | BY RICHARD J. JASPER
A chilly, wind-driven rain soaks a Saturday afternoon in early December, as motorists cautiously make their way up scenic Route 101. This gloomy weather is appropriate - it reflects the mood of the small northern California town divided by this freeway, a town rocked by a tragedy that left every parent fearful for their children's safety. Yet, exiting the highway and turning left onto Novato Boulevard, you see few visible reminders of the nightmare series of events that left many of Petaluma's residents feeling helpless and outraged.
NEWS
December 17, 1994 | By WALTER E. WILLIAMS
"America does not have a crime problem; inner-city America does. " That's what Princeton's professor of political science, John J. DiIulio, says, and he's just about right. If we ignored inner-city violent crime, mostly committed by blacks and Hispanics, America would be a fairly civilized place. Professor DiIulio's article, "The Question of Black Crime," appearing in the fall issue of Public Interest magazine, reports that blacks are 20 percent of the general population of the nation's 75 most populous urban counties.
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Every morning, Gail Willard wakes to thoughts of her slain daughter, Aimee, the college lacrosse star from Delaware County who was raped and killed by a paroled murderer nearly three years ago, her bludgeoned body dumped in a garbage-strewn lot in North Philadelphia. Those memories have led Willard to seek enactment of a federal law that would force state governments to compensate the victims of repeat violent offenders. Dubbed "Aimee's law," the measure would apply in cases in which offenders - after release from prison - cross state lines to commit rape, murder or child molestation.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | Daily News wire services
SUN PRAIRIE, MONT. MAN WINS $31.4M, DIES WEEK AFTER Jack Sherrod, a former auto mechanic who last week got his first check as part of his share in a $31.4 million Powerball jackpot, died of emphysema yesterday. He was 77. Sherrod's son, Russ, won the jackpot in July and shared part of it with his ailing father. Both got their first checks from the Montana Lottery in a ceremony last Tuesday. The father-son team had a running deal for playing the lottery: if either of them won, the man who bought the ticket would share 10 percent of the money with the other.
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | By Elllen Goodman
I pass the children every day now as they walk and bike down the island roads by themselves. The parents who come here from the mainland have finally shed their anxieties like three-piece suits. Gradually the summer adults ratchet down the level of warnings they routinely deliver to their children. They go from "beware of strangers" to "watch out for poison ivy. " Gradually the children, unleashed, grow sturdy with independence. And trust. Just this morning, a small girl I don't know stopped me on my walk to point out an injured swallowtail.
NEWS
October 10, 1995 | By Shaun D. Mullen The Los Angeles Daily News, Los Angeles Times and Associated Press contributed to this report
BACK TO THE FUTURE. Life goes on for the players in the Trial of the Century. Here's a look at what the future may portend: Marcia Clark: The prosecutor has inked a megabuck deal with the William Morris Agency, which is exploring book, TV and movie deals for her. The book will be written by friend Mark Fleischer, who has ghosted books for former President Gerald Ford and former Secretary of State Alexander Haig, among others. Johnnie Cochran Jr.: The world is the defense attorney's oyster.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | BY CHUCK STONE
When Defense Secretary Les Aspin bungled America's mini-wars around the world, President Clinton's loss of confidence prompted Aspin to resign. Now, the president needs to send a similar message to at least three of his top domestic-policy advisers. But to quote a current street expression, Clinton just doesn't understand. Americans do, but nobody is listening to their anguished cries. At least not yet. Put aside this column for a moment and glance through your newspaper.
NEWS
December 19, 2008 | By Monica Hesse
Sometimes we would catch a glimpse of his face, and it would take a second to place him. There was the red baseball cap, the missing teeth, the sweaty hair. We'd think for a second that we knew him. And we did, in a way. Ah, we would realize, back when we were 4, then 6, then 7. It's Adam. He was still dead, his father was still looking for the killer, and we were still haunted by the freckled face of Adam Walsh - the specter of 1980s childhood. This week, Florida police closed his case after 27 long, unsolved years.
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NEWS
December 19, 2008 | By Monica Hesse
Sometimes we would catch a glimpse of his face, and it would take a second to place him. There was the red baseball cap, the missing teeth, the sweaty hair. We'd think for a second that we knew him. And we did, in a way. Ah, we would realize, back when we were 4, then 6, then 7. It's Adam. He was still dead, his father was still looking for the killer, and we were still haunted by the freckled face of Adam Walsh - the specter of 1980s childhood. This week, Florida police closed his case after 27 long, unsolved years.
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Every morning, Gail Willard wakes to thoughts of her slain daughter, Aimee, the college lacrosse star from Delaware County who was raped and killed by a paroled murderer nearly three years ago, her bludgeoned body dumped in a garbage-strewn lot in North Philadelphia. Those memories have led Willard to seek enactment of a federal law that would force state governments to compensate the victims of repeat violent offenders. Dubbed "Aimee's law," the measure would apply in cases in which offenders - after release from prison - cross state lines to commit rape, murder or child molestation.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andrea Seastrand knows the drill. Short and feisty, she'll lock onto a stranger's eyes and start selling. She'll hang in there even if the person is one of those liberals. And to the congresswoman, nobody fits that label better than her Democratic opponent and nemesis, college professor Walter Capps. But that's only where the contrasts begin. Lanky and shy, Capps talks a lot about "Jeffersonian democracy," and gives the impression that he would prefer to do his campaigning at wine and cheese parties.
NEWS
October 22, 1996 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suddenly, a new kind of political ad is hitting the nation's television screens: ads featuring celebrity crime victims. President Clinton has issued two in the last week, and Rep. Dick Zimmer is using one in the vituperative U.S. Senate race in New Jersey. The Clinton ads feature Marc Klaas, the father of 12-year-old murder victim Polly Klaas, and James Brady, Ronald Reagan's former press secretary who was shot and paralyzed during the 1981 assassination attempt on Reagan.
NEWS
October 4, 1996 | by George P. Fletcher, New York Times
The father of Polly Klaas stood up in a California courtroom last week and vented his rage at his daughter's killer. At the sentencing hearing, Marc Klaas said Richard Allen Davis should be condemned to Hitler's circle in hell. Then, after Davis outraged the courtroom by wildly accusing Klaas of molesting his daughter, Klaas lunged toward him and was taken outside. After such an ordeal, is there any juror or judge who would not have felt great sympathy for Klaas and his family?
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | By Jeff Gammage and Lea Sitton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It sounds like a twisted Grimm's Fairy Tale: A stranger creeps into homes, plucking young girls from their beds and spiriting them away - to molest them. Except this predator is no storybook ogre, but a very real menace who police say is loose in the city's Kensington and Feltonville sections. He's added a bizarre kink to an already unusual series of assaults: In each instance, police say, he dutifully drove the girls home, dropping them off near their front doors afterward. Philadelphia police say the man has struck four times in roughly the last three weeks.
NEWS
October 10, 1995 | By Shaun D. Mullen The Los Angeles Daily News, Los Angeles Times and Associated Press contributed to this report
BACK TO THE FUTURE. Life goes on for the players in the Trial of the Century. Here's a look at what the future may portend: Marcia Clark: The prosecutor has inked a megabuck deal with the William Morris Agency, which is exploring book, TV and movie deals for her. The book will be written by friend Mark Fleischer, who has ghosted books for former President Gerald Ford and former Secretary of State Alexander Haig, among others. Johnnie Cochran Jr.: The world is the defense attorney's oyster.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | Daily News wire services
SUN PRAIRIE, MONT. MAN WINS $31.4M, DIES WEEK AFTER Jack Sherrod, a former auto mechanic who last week got his first check as part of his share in a $31.4 million Powerball jackpot, died of emphysema yesterday. He was 77. Sherrod's son, Russ, won the jackpot in July and shared part of it with his ailing father. Both got their first checks from the Montana Lottery in a ceremony last Tuesday. The father-son team had a running deal for playing the lottery: if either of them won, the man who bought the ticket would share 10 percent of the money with the other.
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | By Elllen Goodman
I pass the children every day now as they walk and bike down the island roads by themselves. The parents who come here from the mainland have finally shed their anxieties like three-piece suits. Gradually the summer adults ratchet down the level of warnings they routinely deliver to their children. They go from "beware of strangers" to "watch out for poison ivy. " Gradually the children, unleashed, grow sturdy with independence. And trust. Just this morning, a small girl I don't know stopped me on my walk to point out an injured swallowtail.
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