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NEWS
April 21, 2006
ALL THIS finger-pointing and bickering on campaign finance rules and regulations has got to stop. This political grandstanding is NOT in the interests of voters and the future of the city. What's needed is clear criteria for candidacy. Keep this mess up, and the state will figure a way to hijack candidacy criteria from the city and put their own measure in place. Honest candidates and consistent guidelines would give Philly voters good reason to go out on Election Day. This isn't rocket science here.
NEWS
August 15, 2006
I'D JUST LIKE to pay a great deal of gratitude to our wonderful politicians. 1. Thanks for working five days a week, 52 weeks a year at the minimum wage. 2. Thanks for term limits because keeping your job honest is priority No. 1. 3. Thanks for turning down perks from lobbyists, keeping the integrity of your votes. 4. Thanks for spending thousands of dollars on meaningless campaign ads instead of donating the money to worthy causes. 5. Thanks for party politics.
NEWS
June 5, 2009
WHENEVER these bums and thieves in politics retire, why does it seems like a lot of these crooks never really retire? Let them pay for health insurance like I do and so many other retirees do. These health premiums are killing me and my wife. These crooks live high on the hog - I don't. Pat Panichelli, Philadelphia
NEWS
January 23, 1998 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
A bipartisan interracial group of elected officials turned out yesterday at City Hall to support Common Pleas Judge Frederica Massiah-Jackson's quest for a seat on the U.S. District Court bench. The Black Elected Officials of Philadelphia drew support from white pols of both parties and various legal groups. Mark Aronchick, Philadelphia Bar Association chancellor, said Jackson has been evaluated four times in her 16-year career by various legal groups and she belongs on the federal bench "totally on the basis of merit.
NEWS
November 5, 1987
The Roofers Union scandal notwithstanding, Philadelphia voters did not rise up Tuesday and demand judicial reform. The only message that can be garnered from the returns on the judicial races was that, once you get beyond the high- profile contests, Philadelphia is still a solid Democratic town. That was good news for the Common Pleas Court candidates known as "Casey Five" - especially for Legrome D. Davis, John W. Herron and C. Darnell Jones 2d. Political upstarts appointed on merit alone, they had been denied Senate confirmation and had had to fight their way on to the Democratic ballot by narrowly defeating the party-backed candidates in the primary.
NEWS
September 6, 2000 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
For guys like NBC's Tim Russert, the election season is the equivalent of the Olympics. "Every four years, this election of the president comes around," Russert said Monday. "And I don't know anybody who covers politics who doesn't get a surge from it. " He also gets a surge from big ratings. And a week ago, the Russert-moderated "Meet the Press" notched its 104th consecutive week as the most-watched public affairs show on the air. In doing so, the Russert-led show set the record for the longest winning streak in the series' 53-year history.
NEWS
October 29, 2001
THE DECISION-making process that is shaping the future of Philadelphia's public schools can be characterized as nothing short of secretive, undemocratic and politically motivated. The focus of my outrage however is not toward Gov. Schweiker, who is doing what he's told. The source of my frustration is the Philadelphia public officials who have failed once again at representing the needs of thousands of Philadelphia public education stakeholders. It is unconscionable that any of our elected officials would support legislation that would make it easier for a for-profit company with a questionable academic and fiscal track record to run an entire public school district.
NEWS
August 20, 2009 | By DAVE DAVIES, daviesd@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
Howard Eskin, the sports broadcaster who is often a target of Daily News columnist Stu Bykofsky's barbs, set the tone of Stu's 19th annual Candidates Comedy Night last night with - what else? - a joke: "This is a night when politicians show their sense of humor by telling us jokes, and we show ours by electing them to office. " The lighthearted charity event at Finnigan's Wake, 3rd and Spring Garden streets, had local politicians parading to the mike to make funny with professional comedian Joe Conklin.
NEWS
May 14, 2010
DID YOU ever notice that when it's time for pay raises, they always find ways to get these so-called lawmakers more money? The crooks on City Council all make $100,000-plus - whatever else they got going for themselves. Same for the weasels at the state level when it comes to raises, and the biggest thieves of all - the crooks at the federal level in Washington, D.C. They make the most money, plus whatever other deals they got going for themselves. Some say cut this, cut that to get these hefty pay raises because they pass it on to the taxpayers.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
THE IMAGE of zombies strolling along South Street, running up the "Rocky" steps and perhaps grabbing a cheesesteak is one that seems appealing for Philadelphia tourism, but current tax-credit policies prevented that boom. The article "Why no zombies in Philly?" raised some interesting points. Increasing tourism for Philadelphia would, in fact, spur further economic growth. Unemployment fell 0.5 percentage points from March 2012 to March 2013 in Philadelphia County, but increasing tourism would have the effect of strengthening hospitality and service-based industries and leading to possible job creation in an area where Pennsylvania needs it most.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | Bob Stewart, Daily News Staff Writer
MAYORAL HOPEFUL Anthony Hardy Williams paraded a band of his buddies outside on a chilly afternoon yesterday to endorse his candidacy. His allies hailed from City Hall and Harrisburg. City Councilman Curtis Jones emceed the event on 6th Street across from the National Constitution Center. The impromptu podium setup had no power for a microphone, but Jones felt confident in his ability to shout over the road noise. Jones made it clear in the intros that he wanted people to know "where they're from.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
PHILADELPHIA didn't get the nickname Filthadelphia for nothing. Sidewalks, gutters, alleys and vacant lots across the city serve as litter zones for those who don't bother to find actual trash cans and recycling bins. Could it be that there are too few cans and bins in the city? City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown believes so, and yesterday introduced two bills that would require food businesses and some residential landlords to furnish their properties with trash cans and recycling bins.
NEWS
March 13, 2015
THE LATEST arrests of three state lawmakers on corruption charges may bring familiar feelings of disgusted deja vu to state and city residents. The three - state Reps. Louise Williams Bishop and Michelle Brownlee and former state Rep. Harold James - became the latest crop of corrupt officials caught up in a sting operation, the center of which was lobbyist-turned-informant Tyron Ali's disbursement of cash gifts to lawmakers. None of the gifts, ranging from $750 to $2,000, was reported.
NEWS
January 28, 2015
WHO GETS to make key decisions regarding the future of public education? Those who send their kids to schools? The taxpayers who pay for it? Lawmakers who provide school funding? Experts who study academic data and performance? The good news is that everyone has a stake in education. The bad news is that the most critical decisions related to how schools function are in the hands of a few: lawmakers who decide on how much money the schools get. In this state, those decisions are too often made in the absence of thoughtful analysis or a basic grasp of the facts.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
LET'S BE honest: This is going to raise some eyebrows. Vanessa Lowery Brown, the indicted Democratic state representative scheduled for a preliminary hearing in her bribery case tomorrow, contacted police on Sunday and reported that someone had broken into her West Philadelphia rowhouse and stolen several of her belongings. Brown's state-issued laptop was among the items reportedly taken from her home, said Lt. John Walker, of Southwest Detectives. Brown, 48, apparently noticed that something was amiss when she got home from work on Thursday night.
NEWS
January 8, 2015
GOOGLE a few terms - like "cheesesteak" or "Rocky" - and you'll get few references outside Philadelphia. The same holds true if you search for "councilmanic prerogative" or "councilmanic privilege" - the practice that gives elected lawmakers supreme power over development in their fiefdoms, er, districts. Other cities around the country have city councils, but privilege appears to be a strictly Philly thing. Council prerogative is not codified in the city charter, but in use nonetheless.
NEWS
December 23, 2014
THE PARADE of Philadelphia politicians in trouble with the law seems to grow larger each passing month. Last week, state Reps. Ronald Waters and Vanessa Lowery Brown were charged with accepting bribes offered by a fake lobbyist as part of a sting operation. District Attorney Seth Williams is continuing his investigation of two other state legislators about their possible involvement in taking money from the same "lobbyist. " Last month, state Sen. LeAnna Washington pleaded guilty to using her Senate office staff to raise money for her campaign.
NEWS
December 13, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Is Joe Sestak the Democrats' only hope? The former Delaware County congressman is running hard for a 2016 rematch against U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) in a race Democrats see as crucial to taking back the Senate. So far, Sestak is the only potential challenger to show real interest - cheering those who praise his fight, but worrying some Democrats who chafe at the hard-charging ex-admiral, and who would prefer an alternative but have found none. The race, theoretically, should have significant attractions.
NEWS
December 11, 2014
  WITH PROFOUND apologies to Clement Clarke Moore   . 'Twas the month before New Year with a Wolf in the wings, And Pa. awaited his taxes and things. Republican leaders sat wringing their hands. Oh, what could they do to derail the Wolf's plans? The state of the state? A big fiscal mess. How best to fix it was anyone's guess. The Wolfman was ready, his team really eager, But prospects for GOP help looked so meager. "On Katie," called Wolf, "on Richman, Shapiro.
NEWS
November 26, 2014
OK KIDS, in advance of that all-American holiday when too many eat too much of their favorite foods, I offer a sampling of the journalistic equivalent of yummy. For just as tasty turkey, gravy, cornbread or oyster stuffing, candied yams, greens, sweet potato or pecan pie excite the palates of your family and friends, delicious quotes from the public sector get journalistic juices flowing. Pennsylvania politics provides an all-you-can-believe buffet. There are far too many bon mots to mention.
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