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NEWS
April 21, 2006
ALL THIS finger-pointing and bickering on campaign finance rules and regulations has got to stop. This political grandstanding is NOT in the interests of voters and the future of the city. What's needed is clear criteria for candidacy. Keep this mess up, and the state will figure a way to hijack candidacy criteria from the city and put their own measure in place. Honest candidates and consistent guidelines would give Philly voters good reason to go out on Election Day. This isn't rocket science here.
NEWS
August 15, 2006
I'D JUST LIKE to pay a great deal of gratitude to our wonderful politicians. 1. Thanks for working five days a week, 52 weeks a year at the minimum wage. 2. Thanks for term limits because keeping your job honest is priority No. 1. 3. Thanks for turning down perks from lobbyists, keeping the integrity of your votes. 4. Thanks for spending thousands of dollars on meaningless campaign ads instead of donating the money to worthy causes. 5. Thanks for party politics.
NEWS
June 5, 2009
WHENEVER these bums and thieves in politics retire, why does it seems like a lot of these crooks never really retire? Let them pay for health insurance like I do and so many other retirees do. These health premiums are killing me and my wife. These crooks live high on the hog - I don't. Pat Panichelli, Philadelphia
NEWS
January 23, 1998 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
A bipartisan interracial group of elected officials turned out yesterday at City Hall to support Common Pleas Judge Frederica Massiah-Jackson's quest for a seat on the U.S. District Court bench. The Black Elected Officials of Philadelphia drew support from white pols of both parties and various legal groups. Mark Aronchick, Philadelphia Bar Association chancellor, said Jackson has been evaluated four times in her 16-year career by various legal groups and she belongs on the federal bench "totally on the basis of merit.
NEWS
November 5, 1987
The Roofers Union scandal notwithstanding, Philadelphia voters did not rise up Tuesday and demand judicial reform. The only message that can be garnered from the returns on the judicial races was that, once you get beyond the high- profile contests, Philadelphia is still a solid Democratic town. That was good news for the Common Pleas Court candidates known as "Casey Five" - especially for Legrome D. Davis, John W. Herron and C. Darnell Jones 2d. Political upstarts appointed on merit alone, they had been denied Senate confirmation and had had to fight their way on to the Democratic ballot by narrowly defeating the party-backed candidates in the primary.
NEWS
September 6, 2000 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
For guys like NBC's Tim Russert, the election season is the equivalent of the Olympics. "Every four years, this election of the president comes around," Russert said Monday. "And I don't know anybody who covers politics who doesn't get a surge from it. " He also gets a surge from big ratings. And a week ago, the Russert-moderated "Meet the Press" notched its 104th consecutive week as the most-watched public affairs show on the air. In doing so, the Russert-led show set the record for the longest winning streak in the series' 53-year history.
NEWS
October 29, 2001
THE DECISION-making process that is shaping the future of Philadelphia's public schools can be characterized as nothing short of secretive, undemocratic and politically motivated. The focus of my outrage however is not toward Gov. Schweiker, who is doing what he's told. The source of my frustration is the Philadelphia public officials who have failed once again at representing the needs of thousands of Philadelphia public education stakeholders. It is unconscionable that any of our elected officials would support legislation that would make it easier for a for-profit company with a questionable academic and fiscal track record to run an entire public school district.
NEWS
August 20, 2009 | By DAVE DAVIES, daviesd@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
Howard Eskin, the sports broadcaster who is often a target of Daily News columnist Stu Bykofsky's barbs, set the tone of Stu's 19th annual Candidates Comedy Night last night with - what else? - a joke: "This is a night when politicians show their sense of humor by telling us jokes, and we show ours by electing them to office. " The lighthearted charity event at Finnigan's Wake, 3rd and Spring Garden streets, had local politicians parading to the mike to make funny with professional comedian Joe Conklin.
NEWS
August 7, 2015
POLITICS IS a funny sport sometimes. When U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah was federally indicted last week on a host of fraud and racketeering charges, the reactions from local pols were somber, almost mournful. The word "sad" turned up in a lot of quotes. But when Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman yesterday announced that she was filing criminal charges against state Attorney General Kathleen Kane for leaking grand-jury information to the Daily News , fellow pols didn't hesitate to call for Kane to resign.
NEWS
May 14, 2010
DID YOU ever notice that when it's time for pay raises, they always find ways to get these so-called lawmakers more money? The crooks on City Council all make $100,000-plus - whatever else they got going for themselves. Same for the weasels at the state level when it comes to raises, and the biggest thieves of all - the crooks at the federal level in Washington, D.C. They make the most money, plus whatever other deals they got going for themselves. Some say cut this, cut that to get these hefty pay raises because they pass it on to the taxpayers.
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NEWS
September 2, 2016
WHAT COULD you have been thinking? There isn't a parent out there who hasn't used that phrase at least once with one of their children - usually a teenager - who committed an act that was just plain stupid. At least teenagers have an excuse, which has to do with their developing brains. Experts say their brains aren't mature enough to weigh the rightness of their actions or the consequences. That comes later in life. But, apparently not always. Take District Attorney Seth Williams, who recently disclosed he had accepted $160,500 in gifts over the last five years, ranging from a $45,000 roof job to airfare and lodging for vacations, Visa gift cards worth $1,500, and premium sports tickets - including a sideline pass to Eagles games.
NEWS
August 26, 2016
THERE IS NO good reason for an elected official to create a nonprofit organization. We have said this before - and this week's Inquirer report that a federal probe into District Attorney Seth Williams' finances have extended to a nonprofit he created, prompts us to say it again: The practice of politicians starting nonprofits must stop. We don't know what the probe of Williams' Second Chance Foundation entails - or whether it is related to his admission this month that he failed to report $160,000 in gifts - but we do know that the minute the words "Williams" and "nonprofit" appeared in the same sentence, we had four immediate thoughts: 1. Chaka Fattah 2. Vince Fumo 3. Mike Veon 4. Kenyatta Johnson We also thought about Tom DeLay, Rick Santorum, and, yes, Hillary Clinton.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Daniel Block, and Vibha Kannan, STAFF WRITERS
A flame that was lit last week in Philadelphia continued to scorch Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on Monday, over his criticism of a bereaved Muslim family whose son, an Army captain, was killed in Iraq. Members of nearly two dozen Gold Star families - those who have had a loved one die in military service to the United States - signed a letter demanding an apology and calling Trump's remarks "repugnant and personally offensive to us. " The new president of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the nation's oldest and largest veterans group, called Trump's attack "out of bounds," and said it "will not tolerate anyone berating a Gold Star family member for exercising his or her right of speech or expression.
NEWS
June 29, 2016
New Jersey's leaders have been sticking their heads in the sand for decades to avoid dealing with competing waterfront uses. That has created disorder along the shores of rivers, lakes, bays, and the ocean, where dumps, refineries, and fuel storage compete with sensitive ecosystems, anglers, and people just trying to grasp a moment of peace. Fortunately, skittish politicians have to follow a recent appeals court ruling and subsequent legislation requiring the state to set standards for beach access.
NEWS
June 27, 2016
David Thornburgh is president and CEO of the Committee of Seventy Patricia Dowden is president and CEO of the Center for Business Ethics and Corporate Governance The conviction last week of longtime Congressman Chaka Fattah on 22 charges of racketeering, money laundering, and fraud has sent shock waves through the Philadelphia community. "[He] betrayed the public trust and undermined our faith in government," said U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger. And he is only one of an embarrassing list of state and local officials who have recently pleaded guilty or been convicted of public corruption.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Karen Langley and Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - State lawmakers took a major step Wednesday to prevent corrupt public employees from hanging on to their pensions after being convicted. The House approved a bill to expand the list of crimes for which public employees who have committed wrongdoing on the job would have to forfeit their pensions - a step that gained momentum after some Philadelphia legislators caught in a corruption sting cut plea deals to save their retirement benefits. The bill that the House sent to the Senate would expand the list to include a conviction, guilty plea, or plea of no contest to any felony related to public employment, in addition to the crimes that already trigger forfeiture.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Chris Brennan and Wendy Ruderman, STAFF WRITERS
What does District Attorney Seth Williams have in common with: a Harrisburg bartender who is a whiz at making Prohibition-era cocktails, a crackerjack team of GOP politicos from the state capital, and a longtime loyalist to former Republican Gov. Tom Corbett? The question is not a political joke, but a scenario that includes the key components to the embattled Democrat's new-and-improved campaign operation as he gears up to seek a third term next year. On the last day of 2015, Williams shut down "Friends of Seth Williams," his long-established, Philadelphia-based political action committee, moving $8,272.91 to a new "Seth Williams Victory Committee," campaign finance records show.
NEWS
January 29, 2016
TOUGH WEEK for City Councilman Mark Squilla , who managed to piss off every musician and live-music lover in the city - and a good chunk of America - with one little piece of proposed legislation. On Wednesday, Billy Penn staff writer Dustin Slaughter wrote that Squilla's bill would require "owners of nightclubs, cabarets, bars and restaurants in the city to collect the names, addresses, and phone numbers of entertainers - bands, rappers and DJs - in a registry, and to share that personal information with police upon request.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
It might sound like a cushy gig: former Mayor Michael Nutter, out of office just three weeks, signed on Wednesday as a professor at Columbia University. But David Thornburgh, the leader of the good-government group Committee of 70 and former head of the Fels Institute of Government at the University of Pennsylvania, invoked the famous words of former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger when offering Nutter advice about his new job: "University politics are vicious precisely because the stakes are so small.
NEWS
January 21, 2016
THINGS HAVE gotten so bad in the state Legislature in Harrisburg that a number of inmates are fleeing the asylum. So far, 16 incumbents - 11 Republicans and five Democrats - have announced they will not seek re-election. Some are doing it for career reasons. State Rep. Dwight Evans, for instance, is quitting to run against U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah. But a number said they are departing the scene because they essentially have lost faith in the chambers where they have served. As state Rep. Peter Daley put it: "I'm benching myself for a while.
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