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Poltergeist

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NEWS
May 17, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
About six years ago, a friend of Ernest Joselovitz's told the playwright about the terrifying experience of a rural Tennessee family in 1816. It had to do with a poltergeist. "Most poltergeists are really just annoyances," Joselovitz says of the spirits who manifest their presence with doors opening and closing, objects flying through the air and windows breaking. What made this poltergeist different - and interested him - was that a family death had been attributed to the spirit.
NEWS
March 8, 1997 | by David Bianculli, New York Daily News
POLTERGEIST: THE LEGACY. 8 p.m. tomorrow, Showtime. Since "Hill Street Blues," Daniel J. Travanti has found some of his best work in the strangest places - as a guest star on Showtime's revival of "The Outer Limits. " That series' success led to another spinoff into the supernatural, "Poltergeist: The Legacy. " When "The Legacy" begins its second season tomorrow, it is with Travanti as a cast member. The season opener, introducing Travanti as the boss of the Legacy paranormal-investigation agency, gets the season off to an excellent start.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The "devil" of The Devil and All His Works is anti-Semitism, and playwright Ernest Joselovitz endeavors to show how that evil can poison both a society and the lives of its members. The premise, although valid and full of dramatic potential, isn't made particularly cogent or theatrically compelling by the play, which is receiving its premiere at the People's Light and Theater Company in Malvern. Setting his play in 1895 Vienna, Joselovitz tends to oversimplify the anti- Semitism in the society, and he confuses the personal ramifications of anti-Semitism by giving prominence to a window-breaking poltergeist and Freudian analysis.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In the summer of 1986, Twentieth Century Fox found itself with a movie that had suddenly lost its market. It was called Spacecamp, an innocuous fantasy about teens accidentally launched on the space shuttle, and it was released several months after the Challenger disaster. To no one's surprise, this unintentionally macabre exercise in art imitating death quickly succumbed at the box office. Its shots of the NASA shuttle roaring into orbit collided with the all too painful memories of a national tragedy.
NEWS
September 29, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Making Contact is a dispirited and incoherent movie about the next world that has no place in this one. Anyone who can make the slightest sense of it is surely destined for a just reward in the hereafter. The villain of the piece is a ventriloquist's dummy, who, having command of two expressions and the ability to move his head, easily makes off with the acting honors. But before you blame the actors for this, just try saying, "I once read that such phenomena occur during puberty" as though it were a line of natural dialogue.
NEWS
February 12, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
A hallmark of the "Friday the 13th" series is that none of the movies make much sense. That's certainly true of the fancy (by franchise standards) new remake/sequel hybrid, which takes place at a vacation home next to the notorious Camp Crystal Lake. That's right: a vacation home next to Camp Crystal Lake, site of some 4,000 horrific unsolved murders. Is there a less desirable piece of real estate in America, outside of Amityville? At least the cursed homeowners who bought in the "Poltergeist" development were largely unaware they had built atop a burial ground.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2008 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
FIRST CLAY AIKEN and now this: Ricky Martin is the father of twin boys. The former Latin pop star had the children via a surrogate mother - "She Bangs," but it's still unclear if Martin does - and the babies were born a few weeks ago, according to a statement from his reps. "The children, delivered via gestational surrogacy, are healthy and already under Ricky's full-time care," said the statement. "Ricky is elated to begin this new chapter in his life as a parent and will be spending the remainder of the year out of the public spotlight in order to spend time with his children.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
If nothing else, Troll raises some questions hitherto untouched by Hollywood. To wit: Will a film whose most droll troll looks like a cross between Norman Mailer and former Philadelphia City Councilman Harry Jannotti have horror fans cowering under their seats or simply rolling in the aisle? And can a movie that boasts such florid non-sequiturs as She: "It's a mushroom"; He: "I told you I was a good student" survive its own dialogue, not to mention a dwarf reciting Spenser's Faerie Queen in a dreary monotone?
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and United Press International contributed to this report
The parents of Heather O'Rourke, child star of the Poltergeist movies, filed suit against San Diego's Kaiser Foundation Hospital in Superior Court there yesterday, alleging that an incorrect diagnosis caused the 12-year-old's death in February. The parents' attorney, Sanford Cage, said doctors at the hospital misdiagnosed O'Rourke's condition as a disease affecting the lining of the bowel and treated it with drugs, instead of identifying it as a congenital blockage of the bowel that "a relatively simple operation . . . would have cured.
NEWS
July 20, 1993 | by Jami Bernard, New York Daily News
When the very first movie audiences saw the image of a locomotive coming at them, they screamed and covered their faces. Today, a decapitation hardly raises an eyebrow. To keep up with the shock-cinema sweepstakes, Hollywood seeks to break ever more outrageous taboos. The latest involves assaults on children. It takes a lot to give today's sophisticated audiences that thrill of fear and loathing, that sensation of hitting the wall of one's own tolerance. Carnage, the degradation of women, machine-gun blasts of foul language and sexual oddities have had their day. Now Hollywood has latched onto something that still has the power to jolt even the most jaded moviegoer - putting children in peril.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
So you've outgrown trick-or-treating, you're sick of the same old parade of masked killers on the movie channels, and the thought of running through a cornfield or an abandoned building with community-theater ghouls on your heels makes you yawn. Fear not. There are still plenty of options for the Halloween aficionado in the Philadelphia area this weekend. Eye screams The Philadelphia Film Festival looks back Friday night at a pair of spine-chillers from the past, with screenings of the haunted-TV classic Poltergeist at 9:30 at Shoemaker Green at Penn and M. Night Shyamalan's alien-invasion (with a twist)
NEWS
February 12, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
A hallmark of the "Friday the 13th" series is that none of the movies make much sense. That's certainly true of the fancy (by franchise standards) new remake/sequel hybrid, which takes place at a vacation home next to the notorious Camp Crystal Lake. That's right: a vacation home next to Camp Crystal Lake, site of some 4,000 horrific unsolved murders. Is there a less desirable piece of real estate in America, outside of Amityville? At least the cursed homeowners who bought in the "Poltergeist" development were largely unaware they had built atop a burial ground.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2008 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
FIRST CLAY AIKEN and now this: Ricky Martin is the father of twin boys. The former Latin pop star had the children via a surrogate mother - "She Bangs," but it's still unclear if Martin does - and the babies were born a few weeks ago, according to a statement from his reps. "The children, delivered via gestational surrogacy, are healthy and already under Ricky's full-time care," said the statement. "Ricky is elated to begin this new chapter in his life as a parent and will be spending the remainder of the year out of the public spotlight in order to spend time with his children.
NEWS
October 27, 1997 | By John Baer John Baer covers state government for the Daily News
If Pennsylvania pols had a Halloween store, a big seller this year would be the Greg Vitali mask. Vitali is a 41-year-old Democratic state House member from Havertown who so annoys powerful pols with constant calls for reform that he just might be the scariest pol in Pennsylvania. He is, depending upon your viewpoint, a valiant reformer and public protector or a shrill crank with a showboat side. I tend toward the former. But then I like political fright. And Vitali gives a big-time case of the heebie-jeebies to the rich and famous in both parties, Gov. Ridge and pals and just about anybody linked to government paying out or raking in money.
NEWS
March 8, 1997 | by David Bianculli, New York Daily News
POLTERGEIST: THE LEGACY. 8 p.m. tomorrow, Showtime. Since "Hill Street Blues," Daniel J. Travanti has found some of his best work in the strangest places - as a guest star on Showtime's revival of "The Outer Limits. " That series' success led to another spinoff into the supernatural, "Poltergeist: The Legacy. " When "The Legacy" begins its second season tomorrow, it is with Travanti as a cast member. The season opener, introducing Travanti as the boss of the Legacy paranormal-investigation agency, gets the season off to an excellent start.
NEWS
July 4, 1994 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the Geator with the heater, the Boss with the hot sauce, broadcasting live from Mary Ellen VanDeVort's chandelier! And Frannie Costa's toaster. And every station on Bridget Lewis' AM radio. If your idea of hell is living with someone else's music, pity the people of Harmon Road in Roxborough. There they sit, in the shadow of three WPGR-AM towers and under the spell of all-day oldies from Jerry Blavat's station - Geator Gold Radio - which bleeds through copper pipes, telephone lines, downspouts, Nintendo games and all sorts of electronic equipment gone haywire.
NEWS
July 20, 1993 | by Jami Bernard, New York Daily News
When the very first movie audiences saw the image of a locomotive coming at them, they screamed and covered their faces. Today, a decapitation hardly raises an eyebrow. To keep up with the shock-cinema sweepstakes, Hollywood seeks to break ever more outrageous taboos. The latest involves assaults on children. It takes a lot to give today's sophisticated audiences that thrill of fear and loathing, that sensation of hitting the wall of one's own tolerance. Carnage, the degradation of women, machine-gun blasts of foul language and sexual oddities have had their day. Now Hollywood has latched onto something that still has the power to jolt even the most jaded moviegoer - putting children in peril.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The "devil" of The Devil and All His Works is anti-Semitism, and playwright Ernest Joselovitz endeavors to show how that evil can poison both a society and the lives of its members. The premise, although valid and full of dramatic potential, isn't made particularly cogent or theatrically compelling by the play, which is receiving its premiere at the People's Light and Theater Company in Malvern. Setting his play in 1895 Vienna, Joselovitz tends to oversimplify the anti- Semitism in the society, and he confuses the personal ramifications of anti-Semitism by giving prominence to a window-breaking poltergeist and Freudian analysis.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
About six years ago, a friend of Ernest Joselovitz's told the playwright about the terrifying experience of a rural Tennessee family in 1816. It had to do with a poltergeist. "Most poltergeists are really just annoyances," Joselovitz says of the spirits who manifest their presence with doors opening and closing, objects flying through the air and windows breaking. What made this poltergeist different - and interested him - was that a family death had been attributed to the spirit.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Somewhere in the middle of recounting his life story, Craig T. Nelson star of Drug Wars: The Camarena Story, the NBC mini-series that continues tonight - mentions why he went into acting in the first place. "Looking back on it," he reflects, "I think it was the only way I could break my parents' heart. " That, and the fact that he was a college student fast running out of career options. "I had started out at Central Washington (University) studying criminology, because I had wanted to go into the CIA," says Nelson, a Spokane, Wash.
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