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Pompeii

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NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Few ancient sites stimulate the imagination as vividly as Pompeii. The Great Pyramids of Giza have passed down to us void of life - save for the souls buried there. But Pompeii was teeming with activity, with the lives of men, women, and children when it was buried - and preserved - under ash and pumice after Mount Vesuvius erupted on Aug. 24 in A.D. 79. The Franklin Institute pays homage to Pompeii's vibrant life with One Day in Pompeii , an exhibition of 150 artifacts from the famous Italian city now through April 24. Produced by Premier Exhibitions, Inc., the exhibition will have its world premiere at the Franklin before touring the rest of the country.
TRAVEL
June 29, 2015 | By Helen Armstrong, For The Inquirer
I spent my first semester of college in London making friends, traveling, and having all sorts of unexpected adventures, thanks to a program my university calls the First Year Study Abroad Experience. Lots of cool things happened, but my best story is the time my friend Sara and I got lost in Pompeii at night. We were the last ones allowed inside for the day, and we had only an hour to spend there. They had run out of maps by the time we arrived, so we were left to our own devices to explore.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AS SOMEONE who's spent the last week frantically putting pots underneath leaks dripping from my flat roof, I'm at a loss to explain the behavior of people in "Pompeii. " As they go about their normal, 79 AD business of wearing togas and peeling grapes and complaining about Roman rule, the earth will suddenly tremble, and tiles will fall from the ceiling. There is a pause, a few casual, "probably nothing" looks upward, then it's back to business. Really? No one's the least bit bothered by these events and their possible relationship to the nearby volcano?
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter Domenic Carlino, 92, of Blue Bell, who started Penn National Gaming, died Friday, Nov. 29, at Einstein Medical Center Montgomery of heart disease. A Philadelphia native, the youngest of nine children, Mr. Carlino attended Our Lady of Pompeii parish school and graduated from Northeast Catholic High School. He took classes at the University of Pennsylvania and St. Joseph's University, but health issues kept him from earning a degree. Instead, Mr. Carlino went into business, becoming a florist at shops owned by two of his brothers and later establishing his own shop, the Flower Box, in Ardmore.
NEWS
July 27, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When his father turned 70, Anthony Renzi III knew just what his birthday present would be. "He bought two seats from Shibe Park," his father, Anthony Jr., said. "He said, 'One is for grandpa and one is for you,' " though his grandfather was long gone. The seats from the old ballpark are now in Anthony Jr.'s family room. And whenever he watches the Phillies on TV, that's where Anthony Jr. sits. On Friday, July 22, Anthony Renzi III, 39, of Bensalem, who retired due to illness earlier in July as an AT&T sales manager there, died of a cerebral infection at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
In its third weekend, The Lego Movie still leads at the box office, besting 3 Days to Kill and Pompeii on their opening weekends. The animated Warner Bros. film earned $31.5 million, pushing its domestic total past $183 million. Relativity Media's 3 Days to Kill , starring Kevin Costner and Amber Heard , came in second with $12.3 million, and Sony's Pompeii took the third-place slot with $10 million.   Justin justice TMZ says Justin Bieber will reject the plea deal prosecutors in his Miami Beach DUI case have offered - community service, an alcohol ed course, and random drug testing - because, sources tell TMZ, he won't go for any plea that includes probation, meaning the judge can throw the book at him if he screws up. Self-knowledge is a good thing.
SPORTS
July 8, 2001 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bobby Frankel, second in purses earned among the nation's trainers this year, is difficult to beat under normal circumstances. But Frankel, who will send out Gary Tanaka's Sumitas in today's $150,000 Caesar Rodney Handicap at Delaware Park, is on an especially hot streak after last weekend's bizarre events. Two of his runners were awarded Grade I victories after stewards on two coasts disqualified the first-place finishers for interference. Aptitude was placed first in the $750,000 Hollywood Gold Cup and Senure in the $500,000 United Nations at Monmouth Park.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | By Ed Marcum, Special to The Inquirer
Eight minutes was not much time to act out the destruction of Pompeii or the creation of the solar system, but that was all the time the students from Pennsbury had. Two teams of students from the Pennsbury School District were in Knoxville, Tenn., last week to compete in the world finals of the Odyssey of the Mind competition. As at local, regional and state competitions since October, the seven challengers from Makefield Elementary School and the seven from Pennwood Middle School were asked to act out an imaginary situation, using original plot, dialogue and music.
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Nothing all that unusual seemed likely to unfold at the Philadelphia Orchestra's second consecutive subscription week with principal guest conductor Stéphane Denève: A potentially pop-slanted John Williams film score suite; Graffiti , a choral work by the increasingly popular Magnus Lindberg; and excerpts from Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet ballet. Yet the orchestra, Philadelphia Singers Chorale, and the audience had plenty to contend with at Thursday's concert, which was one of the more distinctive programs of the season - a confounding, mixed success.
NEWS
February 3, 1993 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
STUFFING THE BALLOT BOX WITH LOTS OF FAMILIAR NAMES Stalin, Hitler, Frankenstein. They're all on the ballot in a remote northeastern state of India. Not only that, but Prime Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao is actually urging people to vote for them. When Rao kicks off the Congress Party's election campaign in Meghalaya state, he'll have plenty of other names to push: John Kennedy, Truman, Rockefeller, Tony Curtis. Many of the 290 tribespeople seeking election to the state legislature in the mountainous state have names of monarchs, statesmen, dictators and horror- movie characters.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 27, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When his father turned 70, Anthony Renzi III knew just what his birthday present would be. "He bought two seats from Shibe Park," his father, Anthony Jr., said. "He said, 'One is for grandpa and one is for you,' " though his grandfather was long gone. The seats from the old ballpark are now in Anthony Jr.'s family room. And whenever he watches the Phillies on TV, that's where Anthony Jr. sits. On Friday, July 22, Anthony Renzi III, 39, of Bensalem, who retired due to illness earlier in July as an AT&T sales manager there, died of a cerebral infection at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia.
TRAVEL
June 29, 2015 | By Helen Armstrong, For The Inquirer
I spent my first semester of college in London making friends, traveling, and having all sorts of unexpected adventures, thanks to a program my university calls the First Year Study Abroad Experience. Lots of cool things happened, but my best story is the time my friend Sara and I got lost in Pompeii at night. We were the last ones allowed inside for the day, and we had only an hour to spend there. They had run out of maps by the time we arrived, so we were left to our own devices to explore.
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Nothing all that unusual seemed likely to unfold at the Philadelphia Orchestra's second consecutive subscription week with principal guest conductor Stéphane Denève: A potentially pop-slanted John Williams film score suite; Graffiti , a choral work by the increasingly popular Magnus Lindberg; and excerpts from Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet ballet. Yet the orchestra, Philadelphia Singers Chorale, and the audience had plenty to contend with at Thursday's concert, which was one of the more distinctive programs of the season - a confounding, mixed success.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
In its third weekend, The Lego Movie still leads at the box office, besting 3 Days to Kill and Pompeii on their opening weekends. The animated Warner Bros. film earned $31.5 million, pushing its domestic total past $183 million. Relativity Media's 3 Days to Kill , starring Kevin Costner and Amber Heard , came in second with $12.3 million, and Sony's Pompeii took the third-place slot with $10 million.   Justin justice TMZ says Justin Bieber will reject the plea deal prosecutors in his Miami Beach DUI case have offered - community service, an alcohol ed course, and random drug testing - because, sources tell TMZ, he won't go for any plea that includes probation, meaning the judge can throw the book at him if he screws up. Self-knowledge is a good thing.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AS SOMEONE who's spent the last week frantically putting pots underneath leaks dripping from my flat roof, I'm at a loss to explain the behavior of people in "Pompeii. " As they go about their normal, 79 AD business of wearing togas and peeling grapes and complaining about Roman rule, the earth will suddenly tremble, and tiles will fall from the ceiling. There is a pause, a few casual, "probably nothing" looks upward, then it's back to business. Really? No one's the least bit bothered by these events and their possible relationship to the nearby volcano?
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter Domenic Carlino, 92, of Blue Bell, who started Penn National Gaming, died Friday, Nov. 29, at Einstein Medical Center Montgomery of heart disease. A Philadelphia native, the youngest of nine children, Mr. Carlino attended Our Lady of Pompeii parish school and graduated from Northeast Catholic High School. He took classes at the University of Pennsylvania and St. Joseph's University, but health issues kept him from earning a degree. Instead, Mr. Carlino went into business, becoming a florist at shops owned by two of his brothers and later establishing his own shop, the Flower Box, in Ardmore.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Few ancient sites stimulate the imagination as vividly as Pompeii. The Great Pyramids of Giza have passed down to us void of life - save for the souls buried there. But Pompeii was teeming with activity, with the lives of men, women, and children when it was buried - and preserved - under ash and pumice after Mount Vesuvius erupted on Aug. 24 in A.D. 79. The Franklin Institute pays homage to Pompeii's vibrant life with One Day in Pompeii , an exhibition of 150 artifacts from the famous Italian city now through April 24. Produced by Premier Exhibitions, Inc., the exhibition will have its world premiere at the Franklin before touring the rest of the country.
NEWS
November 16, 2008 | By Barbara Shoemaker Zamochnick FOR THE INQUIRER
When our cabdriver, Peppino, met me and my husband at the Naples airport, it was easy to guess that he was from Pompeii, because his craggy old face looked as if it was carved out of lava rock. Peppino took great pride in his hometown and acted as though the eruption of 79 A.D. had happened yesterday. "Look, you look. Lava, look," he said as we drove past lava formations. Early on, Peppino commanded my husband to sit in the front seat and me in back. That's how we drove everywhere.
FOOD
March 20, 2008 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Collingswood keeps growing. Alex Capasso of Blackbird Dining Establishment (619 Collings Ave.) says he's starting work on West Side Gravy - a 50-seat contemporary diner - across the street at 616 Collings. "I kept looking out the window and saying, 'I wish somebody would open another restaurant here,' " Capasso says. He's also location-hunting in Philly. Meanwhile, Colls crowds have found Joseph Tucker, who's owned a slew of eateries in Philly and at the Shore, including Joseph's, Joseph's on the Avenue, Pompeii, and Tucker's Steak & Seafood House.
NEWS
April 26, 2006 | By ROTAN LEE
Editor's note: As a tribute to Daily News op-ed contributor Rotan Lee, who died on Monday, here are some excerpts of his columns that are . . . quintessentially Rotanesque. THE FIRST of anything deserves special note . . . So, understandably, my first column in the Daily News merits my pause and reflection, reaching deep down to find my voice and take advantage of this print microphone to say what matters, to capture the essence, to write for righteous change. "Maiden Voyage," first column for the Daily News, May 12, 2005 The shadow of the municipal corruption investigation is steadily eclipsing any relevant vestige of an embattled Street administration and a tarnished Philadelphia, giving black folk little reason to rally to their defense . . . Elevating the marginally talented and inexperienced to high office, especially when sycophancy and malleability pre-empt talent, sadly signifies everything wrong in government.
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