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Pond Scum

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NEWS
February 22, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Scientists say they have found a way to make pond scum power your car. It may take 20 years or more to perfect, but two teams of researchers said they had discovered how to alter the process of photosynthesis in common green algae to produce hydrogen, which can be used instead of petroleum-based fuels in cars and trucks. "What the pond scum can do may be driving our cars 20 to 50 years from now," said Michael Seibert, principal scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The "Frog" threw himself on the mercy of the court, but he doesn't have a leg to stand on. Charles "Frog" Turner, 24, is hoping for leniency in exchange for pleading guilty to being the elusive thief responsible for at least 29 house burglaries in North Philadelphia last year. He also pleaded guilty to escaping from police after an arrest in January. Common Pleas Judge Carolyn E. Temin committed Turner, of Diamond Street near 23rd, to prison pending sentencing on Sept.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | by Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer
So what we now know is that Tonya Harding is not a voluptuous 36C, but instead has blocky breasts. Breasts with 90-degree angles and video pasties. This intimate detail of her once-private life escaped on "A Current Affair" last night, which showed America's favorite bad girl pushing a wedding dress - a Halloween costume - from her shoulders and slipping it down to her waist. Her ex-husband, Jeff Gillooly, made the video after a party to which she wore the dress, presumably her own, since Tonya doesn't seem like the kind of girl who would rent a wedding dress if she already had one. In fact, can you see her getting that dress preserved at the cleaners and lovingly placing it up on the bedroom closet shelf?
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* HANNIBAL. 10 p.m. Thursday, NBC10.   AS THE creative mind behind Fox's "Wonderfalls" and ABC's "Pushing Daisies," Bryan Fuller is known for making the kind of beautiful television not nearly enough people watch. On Thursday, Fuller returns with NBC's "Hannibal," a gorgeously realized production with a difference. This one comes with a built-in audience that can't get enough of fiction's favorite serial killer, Dr. Hannibal Lecter (here played by Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen)
NEWS
March 16, 2000 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
A bail bondsman has signed. So have police officers, Water Department employees, a number of World War II veterans and students from Delaware Valley High School. Even a Graterford prisoner - perhaps with his sights on a new cellmate - has signed his name to the petition to bring fugitive Ira Einhorn back to Philadelphia to face justice for the 1977 murder of his girlfriend Holly Maddux. As of late yesterday, the Daily News had collected 2,250 signatures. That's oh - let's see now - 2,200 more signatures than Einhorn said he has collected from friends in France who want the old hippie to stay on that side of the ocean.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1997 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before 9 a.m. yesterday, the sidewalk leading to Concourse Lake in Fairmount Park near Memorial Hall was barely visible: The concrete had succumbed to the grass growing through its cracks. Then Tony Pizzi started fighting back. With the motions of a skilled snow shoveler, he uprooted the grassy invaders. An hour later, he had cleared away a portion of the walkway as Diane O'Donoghue stuffed the grass into plastic bags. Along the side of the lake, others wearing white T-shirts emblazoned "I've Got the Spirit" fought similar battles, except theirs were a little wetter.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1999 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It's old, old hat: the undercover cop who's gone so far into his gangland guise that he experiences an identity crisis, his allegiance torn between the police who trained him and the pond scum he's befriended. And let's not forget the girlfriend - or the wife - left on her lonesome, waiting for the phone to ring with bad news, or just waiting, and waiting some more. In In Too Deep, Omar Epps stars as Jeffrey Cole, a cocky Cincinnati detective from the projects who's ready to exact revenge on the slimeballs and drug dealers who cut down so many of his friends in their youth.
SPORTS
June 15, 2010
IF YOU HONK the horn in a battered Volvo hidden in a thicket of weeds behind a Nashville church and nobody hears it, does it make a sound? Craig Daliessio hoped not. "I broke the cardinal rule of homelessness," Daliessio said. "Never give away a good hiding place. " That was the night Harry Kalas saved his life. Oct. 29, 2008. Daliessio was homeless, jobless, living in that battered Volvo hidden in that thicket of weeds behind that church in Nashville, wary of cops and robbers and whatever else lurks in the night, sleep deprived, groggy from the beating life was handing him. "And then, on Fox Radio," Daliessio said, "the announcer, maybe it was Joe Buck, said, 'We're going to play you the local feed courtesy of 1210-AM in Philadelphia and the great Harry Kalas as he calls the final out for his beloved Philadelphia Phillies.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | BY DONALD KAUL
You don't know about me without you have read a speech by the name of "I Wear Their Scorn As a Badge of Honor," by Mr. Dan Quayle, the vice president of the U.S. of A. He was talking about the Cultural Elite and them always making jokes about him. The audience was 15,000 Baptists in Indiana and they liked it pretty well. Least ways they all stood up and clapped when he was done, which is always a good sign. Mr. Quayle, he talked about how this here Cultural Elite is all time making trouble, causing all manner of terrible things to happen.
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | By Robert S. Boyd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It was the most awesome invasion in all history, dwarfing the Allies' liberation of Europe in World War II. Its armies occupied not one but every continent on Earth, and they never withdrew. We're talking about the conquest of the land by pond scum - properly known as green algae. It happened almost 500 million years ago, and we owe our lives and fortunes to its success. "We need an attitude adjustment toward algae," said Russell Chapman, a biologist at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge.
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SPORTS
May 29, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Ruben Amaro Jr.'s latest pitch about the ignorance of fans had less control than a Jake Diekman fastball. What he said to CSNPhilly.com was as dumb as a tiger entering a den of lions and rubbing the ears of a lioness. Yes, the Phillies general manager got what he deserved on this one. If he had only applied the rule about thinking before speaking he could have avoided a media maelstrom and made a valid point about how patience is needed in the midst of a rebuilding project. Instead, he just ticked off a bunch of people who already had him ranked one level below pond scum.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* HANNIBAL. 10 p.m. Thursday, NBC10.   AS THE creative mind behind Fox's "Wonderfalls" and ABC's "Pushing Daisies," Bryan Fuller is known for making the kind of beautiful television not nearly enough people watch. On Thursday, Fuller returns with NBC's "Hannibal," a gorgeously realized production with a difference. This one comes with a built-in audience that can't get enough of fiction's favorite serial killer, Dr. Hannibal Lecter (here played by Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen)
SPORTS
June 15, 2010
IF YOU HONK the horn in a battered Volvo hidden in a thicket of weeds behind a Nashville church and nobody hears it, does it make a sound? Craig Daliessio hoped not. "I broke the cardinal rule of homelessness," Daliessio said. "Never give away a good hiding place. " That was the night Harry Kalas saved his life. Oct. 29, 2008. Daliessio was homeless, jobless, living in that battered Volvo hidden in that thicket of weeds behind that church in Nashville, wary of cops and robbers and whatever else lurks in the night, sleep deprived, groggy from the beating life was handing him. "And then, on Fox Radio," Daliessio said, "the announcer, maybe it was Joe Buck, said, 'We're going to play you the local feed courtesy of 1210-AM in Philadelphia and the great Harry Kalas as he calls the final out for his beloved Philadelphia Phillies.
NEWS
October 31, 2006
In the annals of negative election advertising, this year should be known as the Year of the Playboy Bunny. You've probably seen the TV commercial attacking U.S. Senate candidate Harold Ford Jr., a Tennessee Democrat who is African American. It features a bubbly blonde, scantily clad, gushing that she met Ford at a Playboy party and urging him breathlessly to "call me. " The commercial plays shamelessly on prejudices about black men with white women; even Ford's Republican opponent called on the GOP to stop airing the offensive ad. The Republican National Committee, which gave money to the group that paid for the commercial, disavowed responsibility.
NEWS
April 26, 2004 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Any day now, immature nymphs of the periodical cicadas known as Brood 10 will crawl from the earth after 17 years underground, climb a foot or so up tree trunks or weed stalks, shed their skins, and emerge as adults. Perhaps no other bug found around here excites as much interest and curiosity as these longest-lived insects in North America, which will soon be popping up in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and other eastern states. And yet, except for their extended stay underground feeding on tree roots, periodical cicadas are no more amazing than numerous creatures and plants whose lives are unfolding in our own backyards.
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | By Robert S. Boyd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It was the most awesome invasion in all history, dwarfing the Allies' liberation of Europe in World War II. Its armies occupied not one but every continent on Earth, and they never withdrew. We're talking about the conquest of the land by pond scum - properly known as green algae. It happened almost 500 million years ago, and we owe our lives and fortunes to its success. "We need an attitude adjustment toward algae," said Russell Chapman, a biologist at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge.
NEWS
March 16, 2000 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
A bail bondsman has signed. So have police officers, Water Department employees, a number of World War II veterans and students from Delaware Valley High School. Even a Graterford prisoner - perhaps with his sights on a new cellmate - has signed his name to the petition to bring fugitive Ira Einhorn back to Philadelphia to face justice for the 1977 murder of his girlfriend Holly Maddux. As of late yesterday, the Daily News had collected 2,250 signatures. That's oh - let's see now - 2,200 more signatures than Einhorn said he has collected from friends in France who want the old hippie to stay on that side of the ocean.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Scientists say they have found a way to make pond scum power your car. It may take 20 years or more to perfect, but two teams of researchers said they had discovered how to alter the process of photosynthesis in common green algae to produce hydrogen, which can be used instead of petroleum-based fuels in cars and trucks. "What the pond scum can do may be driving our cars 20 to 50 years from now," said Michael Seibert, principal scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1999 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It's old, old hat: the undercover cop who's gone so far into his gangland guise that he experiences an identity crisis, his allegiance torn between the police who trained him and the pond scum he's befriended. And let's not forget the girlfriend - or the wife - left on her lonesome, waiting for the phone to ring with bad news, or just waiting, and waiting some more. In In Too Deep, Omar Epps stars as Jeffrey Cole, a cocky Cincinnati detective from the projects who's ready to exact revenge on the slimeballs and drug dealers who cut down so many of his friends in their youth.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1997 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before 9 a.m. yesterday, the sidewalk leading to Concourse Lake in Fairmount Park near Memorial Hall was barely visible: The concrete had succumbed to the grass growing through its cracks. Then Tony Pizzi started fighting back. With the motions of a skilled snow shoveler, he uprooted the grassy invaders. An hour later, he had cleared away a portion of the walkway as Diane O'Donoghue stuffed the grass into plastic bags. Along the side of the lake, others wearing white T-shirts emblazoned "I've Got the Spirit" fought similar battles, except theirs were a little wetter.
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