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Pool Tables

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NEWS
July 8, 1993 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
The girl in the denim shorts and white halter top had that wholesome, corn- fed look about her as she sat at the bar of Maynard's in Margate, demurely nursing a drink. But once she'd gripped a pool cue, that sweet, innocent look metamorphosed into something you might find on the face of a barracuda sizing up a school of guppies. To say she beat her exasperated date at the game is an understatement. As the Three Stooges would say, she murderized him. "He'll probably never ask me out again," she later lamented to a friend.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
There's one type of Shore spot that's often taken for granted: those good, old, comfy, no-frills bars. These are the type of places that offer such amenities as pool tables, grub that's low on nutrition but big on taste, lively conversation and great jukeboxes. The places the locals go. Our first stop is Jo Jo's Bar, 263 S. New York Rd. (Route 9), Oceanville; 609-652-9865. Operated by the affable, no-nonsense Marie Giroud, whose family has owned the place for 48 years, this shack-like bar features a let-it-all-hang-out atmosphere.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
A lawsuit in federal court seeking more than $500,000 in damages has been filed against Upper Darby Township and five officials by the owners of the site of a proposed sports club. Colleen Price and James Duffy, owners of the property at Miller Avenue and State Road, contend that the township illegally revoked their permit to operate a sports club and pool hall. Ellen Meriwether, the attorney representing Price and Duffy, said that, as a result of losing the permit, her clients lost a potential five-year tenant.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By Larisa Kuntz, Special to The Inquirer
For the second time in two weeks, a feisty crowd opposed to a recreation center it calls a "pool hall" dominated proceedings at the Lower Southampton Supervisors' meeting Wednesday night. The center, being installed at 83 Bustleton Ave. in Feasterville, plans to be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, complained Michael Piccari, spokesman for about 85 residents present. Controversy over the construction first erupted at the supervisors' Sept. 12 meeting when some neighbors of the center said the center would stay open 24 hours.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
The fluorescent orange and green signs at the front window of the Game Gallery in Pitman proclaim "We're Back" and "Please only two kids outside at one time. Thanks. " The signs are indicative of some problems the owners of the arcade have faced recently: At least two of its neighbors complained at an April 23 Borough Council meeting about the behavior of youths who patronize the seven- month-old facility, and police closed the arcade for 10 days last month until two pool tables were removed to comply with zoning laws.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plans to open a pool hall and billiards parlor near the Sears, Roebuck & Co. plant on Roosevelt Boulevard have been canceled in the face of strong neighborhood opposition. Area civic organizations obtained more than 250 signatures on petitions in opposition and were rounding up speakers for a Zoning Board of Adjustment hearing last Tuesday when Albert A. Taus notified Councilman Jack Kelly's office that Adams Plaza Associates was withdrawing its application to open the pool hall, a Kelly aide said.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By Larisa Kuntz, Special to The Inquirer
Nearly 100 residents crowded the Lower Southampton Township building Wednesday night to fight a recreation center under construction on Bustleton Pike near Dolton Road that is to have pool tables and video games. Most residents first heard of the center at 83 Bustleton Pike through a flier circulated anonymously last week throughout the neighborhood. The flier said the "pool hall" would be open 24 hours a day and would have 40 pool tables plus video games. "I have a little girl who walks through there to get the bus. I don't want a pool hall open 24 hours.
NEWS
June 16, 1998 | by Sally Siebert, For the Daily News
On a recent Friday night, groups of young boys played pool as a nearby boom box played Verve's "Lucky Man. " Across the room, three girls huddled and giggled in private conversation. "It's cool here," said Paula Neal-Mink, 10, as she threw her body face-down into the cushions of bright orange sofa. "There's stuff to do - or not to do - depending on how you feel," she said. The "cool" place where kids are gathering in Moorestown these days is called the Third Floor, a community center for the under-20 set. It's on the third floor of the township's recreation building - which once housed Moorestown High School - on Third Street.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | By Melody Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Children may now enter pool halls in Upper Darby with their parents' permission - and the permission of an ordinance approved by the Township Council. About 25 residents attended the council's meeting Wednesday to urge it to amend an ordinance adopted in 1951 that banned anyone under 18 from entering a pool hall. Under the amendment approved by the council, that age is lowered to 17. Children under 17 are permitted to enter if accompanied by a parent or a guardian, or if a notarized statement of consent with the child's photograph and the parent's signature is presented.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Northeast business owner has decided against opening a pool hall in the Knights Road Shopping Center after Millbrook residents protested the plan. Bruce Young had proposed opening the pool hall next to the Knights Tavern. It would have had 10 pool tables and 20 video games, and would have stayed open until 1 a.m. on weekdays and 2 a.m. Friday and Saturday nights, according to Sandra Kirk, Millbrook Civic Association president. Young, owner of Young Vending Inc., 14230 Bustleton Ave., explained his plans to residents at the civic group's March 15 meeting.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
  Unlike pool, according to Prof. Harold Hill in The Music Man, billiards is a pastime that requires "horse sense and a cool head and a keen eye. " Alderfer Auction and Appraisal in Hatfield will promote those virtues with a sale, beginning at 9 a.m. next Friday, of 450 lots of what it advertises as antique and vintage billiard collectibles. About half are promotional and ephemera items, but the sale also offers cues, balls, chalks - even three tables, although to judge from the descriptions in the online auction catalog accessible at www.artfact.com , a lot of the items pertain to pocket billiards, the formal term for pool.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Conditions were less than ideal when the Bad Plus first played Chris' Jazz Cafe in 2003. The club's notoriously tuning-resistant piano was crammed into a narrow corner opposite the bar. Young fans drawn by the band's penchant for covering Nirvana and Blondie hits crowded around cross-legged on the floor, uncomfortably close. Yet the irreverent jazz trio kept coming back, and this weekend they helped celebrate Chris' 22d anniversary with a two-night stint Friday and Saturday. Much has changed at Chris' over the last nine years.
LIVING
February 3, 2006 | By Elaine Markoutsas FOR THE INQUIRER
Odds are good that the next time you go furniture shopping, you'll be drawn to a new player. Time to deal. Make your move. Game tables have become a decorating focus. Designed for a dedicated game or family room, or to slip into living rooms, libraries and even bedrooms, some are chameleons, crafted with beautiful woods that convert with a twist or flip to reveal a protective felt board for poker chips or safe tossing of dice. It's estimated that more than 50 million Americans, and possibly as many as 80 million, are playing poker these days.
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | by Nicole Weisensee Egan, Daily News Staff Writer
Main Line restaurateur Mel Glickstein and his friend Richie Coppolino were ordered yesterday to stand trial on charges that they sexually assaulted Coppolino's ex-girlfriend on a pool table in October. After hearing the alleged victim's graphic testimony during a three-hour preliminary hearing, District Justice Henry Schireson raised Coppolino's bail from 10 percent of $25,000 to $250,000 cash. "I've been hearing cases for 16 years and I can't recall a more compelling case with a scenario for high bail," said Schireson, of Narberth, who added that he thinks the victim was credible.
NEWS
January 10, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hot tubs and $21 mops. Hot tubs and $39.95 mops. In every other aisle at the Philadelphia Home Show, it seemed some salesperson was showing off a hot tub or selling some super-absorbent mop. Of course, there were other necessities for an affluent, modern existence, like a $2,695 table hockey game and a $3,195 pool table. But hot tubs and mops were as prevalent as dust bunnies in a bachelor's home at the 19th annual Philadelphia Home Show, which opened Saturday and runs through next Sunday at the Convention Center at 12th and Arch Streets in Center City.
NEWS
September 13, 1998 | By Christina Asquith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Andy Sanchez says he no longer trusts most adults. Hanging out on Market street with five friends, mostly bare-chested and tattoed, he tells his life story in the past tense. "With us, it's kinda too late. We're already lost," says the 17-year-old, who has moved out of his mother's house. But among the growing number of teens, marked by absentee fathers, financial struggle and a sense of hopelessness, one grown-up voice - and his youth center - hold the respect and keep the faith of even the toughest teens.
NEWS
August 15, 1998 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It wasn't just that Vernon Delaware stole the quarters from the pool table and the beer proceeds from the Veterans of Foreign Wars post in King of Prussia. It was that he stole from his own, according to the former soldiers and sailors gathered in a Montgomery County courtroom yesterday. They watched as Delaware, a 51-year-old Vietnam vet from Pottstown, pleaded guilty to stealing more than $49,000 from the post last year. "When a person is in a position of fiduciary responsibility, they violate not only that responsibility, they violate trust," said Assistant District Attorney Wendy Demchick-Alloy.
NEWS
June 16, 1998 | by Sally Siebert, For the Daily News
On a recent Friday night, groups of young boys played pool as a nearby boom box played Verve's "Lucky Man. " Across the room, three girls huddled and giggled in private conversation. "It's cool here," said Paula Neal-Mink, 10, as she threw her body face-down into the cushions of bright orange sofa. "There's stuff to do - or not to do - depending on how you feel," she said. The "cool" place where kids are gathering in Moorestown these days is called the Third Floor, a community center for the under-20 set. It's on the third floor of the township's recreation building - which once housed Moorestown High School - on Third Street.
NEWS
December 21, 1997 | By Josh Goldstein and Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On the final weekend before Christmas, merchants and shoppers found Philadelphia-area malls less crowded yesterday than they were a year ago, as people appeared to look for less commercial ways to express holiday sentiments. The four-day Christmas weekend and a strong economy, meanwhile, appear to be spurring lots of holiday travel. Industry spokesmen say more people are expected to drive, ride and fly this holiday than last. As shoppers swarmed yesterday looking for last-minute Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa gifts, merchants said that despite packed parking lots and checkout lines, sales were down from last year.
NEWS
September 28, 1997 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fred Moran does not want people to get ahead of themselves. The president of the township Board of Commissioners understands that residents in this somewhat congested and highly developed suburb are excited by the prospect that Haverford State Hospital's 239 acres - one of the last tracts of mostly open space in the area - could be turned over to the township when the state closes the hospital in June. Although Moran thinks the township will receive the land, or a portion of it, that will not be definite until the state legislature passes a bill that deeds the property to the township.
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