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NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By MARK ALAN HUGHES
A report on urban poverty recently released by the National League of Cities contains some disturbing findings for the city and the Philadelphia area. I say this not just as author of the report, but as a Philadelphia resident and someone who cares deeply about the future of this city and region. Poverty is complex, and scholars have long sought ways to manage this complexity by identifying its crucial dimensions. The NLC report focuses on three dimensions of urban poverty today: It is more persistent among particular households, more concentrated within particular neighborhoods, and more isolated from traditional avenues of escape.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
RE THE recent Page 3 story on the shooting of a teen in Fairmount: The article was an outright racial attack on the people of my neighborhood. The story stated that "a white woman who dates black men brought them home. " So what? Saturday's story seemed to contradict Friday's on the racial angle. But with the generous space given to the story on Friday, and the followup on Saturday, the Daily News seemed to be saying that this shooting was somehow worse than the eight murders of young black men that recently occurred within blocks of this shooting and which were given a few sentences, if any, in the "Region" column.
NEWS
July 8, 2005
ISYMPATHIZE with Stephen Niksa (letters, June 27). When I was growing up in Georgia in the 1940s, all sorts of caricatures of the Chinese were used by the media, and all sorts of names were applied to them, implying backwardness in accomplishments. They spoke terrible English, if at all, and it seemed that the only thing they were good for was as servants. It was only after leaving that part of the South that I saw the Chinese in a different light. But the North was not much different.
NEWS
March 9, 1998 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a church service that was equal parts political rally, gospel glorification and prayerful send-off into the lion's den, about 100 supporters of Judge Frederica Massiah-Jackson braved a teeming rain to spend two hours singing her praises last night as she girded herself for a make-or-break hearing in Washington on Wednesday before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee. Massiah-Jackson, 47, was nominated to the federal district court last summer. She was confirmed by the committee in November, but saw her nomination stalled by conservative Republicans before it could be presented to the full Senate for a vote.
NEWS
September 9, 2005
SINCE THE hurricane, all I read and see on TV are people pointing fingers. Instead of wasting energy blaming people like the president and our government, let's make sure it doesn't happen again. African-Americans are saying that if the victims were white, things would have gone differently. But that is not true. We were unprepared and not trained for such a devastating event. The government is made up of blacks and whites and all ethnicities. And what about Mayor Ray Nagin, who is black?
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | By Mike Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fellow Citizen: You will carry a beeper and a notebook at all hours of the day. When the beeper sounds, you will record your emotion on the pad. What sounds like an Orwellian nightmare was actually the unusual research method used in an ambitious study of TV viewing and its possible harmful effects. George Gerbner, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, questions the methodology. During a 13-year study of television viewing in America, whose findings were released yesterday by Robert Kubey of Rutgers University and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi of the University of Chicago, researchers found that people were often passive, tense, unable to concentrate, bored and drowsy while watching TV - and grew increasingly irritable, even hostile, the longer they watch.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Grant Calder
On this last day of January in 1865, the House of Representatives passed a proposal for a constitutional ban on slavery. In Steven Spielberg's latest film, Abraham Lincoln is the consummate politician who, in the midst of a great war and facing determined resistance in Congress, made it happen. But before we join the "Why can't President Obama be more like Lincoln?" chorus, it's worth noting that the 13th Amendment was less a great leap forward than a single conflicted step. It reads, "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | By ACEL MOORE
Events in the Persian Gulf and the recent congressional debate have overshadowed much of the tributes to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the occasion of his 62d birthday. Speaker after speaker - from Riccardo Muti, Philadelphia Orchestra maestro, to C. Delores Tucker, founder and president of the Philadelphia Martin Luther King Jr. Association for Nonviolence, who officiated over the association's annual luncheon Tuesday - made reference to the late human rights leader's opposition to war. Because Dr. King, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, was a true pacifist and an advocate of nonviolence, many speakers have pointed to the irony that the United Nations' authorization for use of force in the Persian Gulf went into effect on Jan. 15, Dr. King's birthday.
NEWS
June 13, 1994 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
If fate had taken a different course, Father Paul Washington might have become bishop of Liberia. Instead he became a high-profile Philadelphia activist with an FBI file as rector of the Church of the Advocate, hosted the Black Panthers, protested the Vietnam War, founded a soup kitchen, supported gay rights, and participated in the highly controversial ordination of the first women into the Episcopal priesthood. Washington, 73, who served as an Episcopal priest in Liberia, where the bishop wanted him to become his successor in the late '40s and early '50s, tells his story in a just-released autobiography published by Temple University Press: "Other Sheep I Have.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | BY DON WILLIAMSON
Sometimes it just takes asking the right question. Kevin McGarity did that in a recent letter: I have been reading your column for quite some time and I can sense your frustration concerning the plight of African Americans. Unfortunately, your viewpoint doesn't clarify many of the issues you touch upon. . . . Now, with the economy shrinking, the decapitalization of working people has made the ability to raise oneself onto a moderate plane of well being a herculean task.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I'M SORRY, Philly. I tried to talk sense to my friend Bob Huber. I really did. If Bob's name is familiar to you, it's because he wrote this month's Philadelphia magazine cover story. It's called "Being White in Philly," and it's lighting up the blogosphere for a good reason: It's terrible. Well-intentioned and well-written, yes. But terrible. Bob has been writing for Philly mag for decades. From 1992 to 1995, I was a writer there, too, and we became friends. We don't see each other much these days.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Grant Calder
On this last day of January in 1865, the House of Representatives passed a proposal for a constitutional ban on slavery. In Steven Spielberg's latest film, Abraham Lincoln is the consummate politician who, in the midst of a great war and facing determined resistance in Congress, made it happen. But before we join the "Why can't President Obama be more like Lincoln?" chorus, it's worth noting that the 13th Amendment was less a great leap forward than a single conflicted step. It reads, "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Surprise, surprise. A Commonwealth Court judge rejected the challenge to Pennsylvania's voter ID law. I can't even say I'm shocked. Angry? Darned right I am. But shocked? Truth is, I didn't expect any good would come out of the well-intentioned effort by a coalition of lawyers to appeal a law ginned up to prevent fraud but that in and of itself perpetrates the worst kind of fraud. Proving, once more, that "we haven't achieved full democracy, and the struggle for the right to vote is the history of that," says Lorraine Minnite, a Rutgers-Camden professor and author of The Myth of Voter Fraud . All we have to do is look at the Corbett administration's systematic chipping away of programs that reduce working-class citizens to poor and the poor to downright destitute to figure out what's going on here.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
RE THE recent Page 3 story on the shooting of a teen in Fairmount: The article was an outright racial attack on the people of my neighborhood. The story stated that "a white woman who dates black men brought them home. " So what? Saturday's story seemed to contradict Friday's on the racial angle. But with the generous space given to the story on Friday, and the followup on Saturday, the Daily News seemed to be saying that this shooting was somehow worse than the eight murders of young black men that recently occurred within blocks of this shooting and which were given a few sentences, if any, in the "Region" column.
NEWS
January 16, 2006 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
The barber leaned close so the white folks couldn't hear. How are you adjusting to the culture shock? he asked. Takes some getting used to, I replied. We were two black men in a place - the Appalachian foothills where Ohio abuts West Virginia - that is home to very few people like us. But the culture shock he spoke of wasn't about race so much as economics. It's a strange thing, he said, still leaning close, to see white people, poor. It is strange, indeed. Not that I didn't know there are white poor.
NEWS
December 28, 2005 | By ROTAN LEE
I WRITE for the Philadelphia Daily News because they offered me a voice, the columnists think critically, the editorials nudge the conscience and Signe Wilkinson draws from the heart. Still, nothing is perfect. After reading last Wednesday's editorial, "Is He Crackers?", impugning Carl Singley, one of the city's best lawyers, for a so-called racial epithet, I felt compelled to respond. I telephoned Carl to get his version of the events. He readily admits using the word "crackers" in describing several members of an all-white jury, an angry slip of the tongue in the aftermath of a racial-discrimination lawsuit where four white men prevailed against the School District of Philadelphia for unlawful termination of employment.
NEWS
September 9, 2005
SINCE THE hurricane, all I read and see on TV are people pointing fingers. Instead of wasting energy blaming people like the president and our government, let's make sure it doesn't happen again. African-Americans are saying that if the victims were white, things would have gone differently. But that is not true. We were unprepared and not trained for such a devastating event. The government is made up of blacks and whites and all ethnicities. And what about Mayor Ray Nagin, who is black?
NEWS
July 8, 2005
ISYMPATHIZE with Stephen Niksa (letters, June 27). When I was growing up in Georgia in the 1940s, all sorts of caricatures of the Chinese were used by the media, and all sorts of names were applied to them, implying backwardness in accomplishments. They spoke terrible English, if at all, and it seemed that the only thing they were good for was as servants. It was only after leaving that part of the South that I saw the Chinese in a different light. But the North was not much different.
NEWS
July 30, 1998 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A sweeping new government report surprised even its authors by showing how powerful money and education are in shaping Americans' health. The authors found a stair-step pattern from rich to poor that holds true for virtually every health-risk factor, for every disease - whether a chronic illness such as cancer or a communicable disease such as HIV - and for every cause of death. The economic ladder is also found within racial and ethnic groups: Wealthier African Americans not only fare better than middle-class and poorer African Americans, but also report that their health is better than that of middle-income or poor whites.
NEWS
March 10, 1998 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Poor school districts in Pennsylvania where more than half the students are minorities get less state aid, according to a new analysis, than comparably poor districts where most students are white. Using that assertion, the city and school district filed a lawsuit yesterday calling the commonwealth's education aid formula "legally unjustifiable and racially discriminatory. " The suit is believed to be the first in the nation to charge that a state's system for funding public schools violates federal civil rights law. School finance systems, which rely on local property taxes and generally result in spending disparities between richer and poorer districts, have been challenged in 36 state courts, but not directly on racial discrimination grounds in federal court.
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