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NEWS
September 20, 2006
RE POPE Benedict XVI's comments about Islam: It amazes me how leaders in the Muslim world, political or religous, say whatever they want about whoever they want, but the rest of us worry about being politically correct. Islamic extremists want to kill us. When someone critizes them, they kill innocents all over the world. Too much of America has forgotten that horrible day on 9/11. Bill Newbold Philadelphia
NEWS
September 7, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Archbishop Charles Chaput recently sought to reassure an apprehensive Philly flock of the relative ease and desirability of attending this month's World Meeting of Families and papal visit, noting in an Inquirer commentary that Scripture doesn't find Mary and Joseph fretting over logistics on the way to Bethlehem. A skeptic might also note that the couple reportedly ended up staying with the livestock. In any case, the archbishop's sanguine posture was part of a welcome effort to recalibrate the approach to papal preparations, which has suffered from too much Herod and too few wise men. Much of the shift has taken the form of aggressive rebranding.
NEWS
April 14, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
Local Jewish leaders hailed the Pope's visit yesterday to Rome's main synagogue, but were disappointed by his failure to recognize the state of Israel. Two Roman Catholic scholars praised the visit, the first ever by a pontiff to a Jewish house of worship, as significant, "a breakthrough sort of thing" as one of them, Temple University religion professor Leonard Swidler, put it. "It's very difficult for the pope to do anything of political significance at the moment because if he should visit Israel it would anger the Muslim world," Rabbi Albert Lewis of Temple Beth Sholom in Haddon Heights, N.J., said.
NEWS
September 14, 1994 | By MARTIN E. MARTY
United States citizens, who thought they knew how warm tempers can get when religion enters domestic politics, last week joined the world in feeling the heat of a religious explosion on the international political scene. Cairo provided the stage, as delegates from 160 nations took up the most fateful issues at century's end: How many people can the globe sustain tomorrow, and how can nations develop resources to sustain more in the future? Leave it to the statisticians and economists, thought some, forgetting how much the clergy care about what happens in bedroom, clinic and granary.
SPORTS
May 19, 1994 | by Ted Taylor, Special to the Daily News
You think Babe Ruth was a tough autograph? Well, he wasn't. In fact, the Babe willingly signed for anyone who asked him. Not so with the pope. I'm not talking about the Phillies' Paul Owens. I'm referring to John Paul II, the real pope, and the autograph he recently signed for Detroit Tigers manager Sparky Anderson. Jim Hawkins, longtime Detroit baseball writer-turned-hobby-show promoter, returned from a visit to spring training with an amusing tale about the pope's autograph.
NEWS
July 9, 2009 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The owners of the DiCocco Family St. Jude Shop are getting to be experts at this. When there's a presentation for the pope, call the store in Havertown. Twice in the last 15 months, the store owners have been tapped for their Benedict XVI know-how. The first time, they helped supply a specially made chair the pope used during a U.S. visit. This time, they assisted the White House in finding a gift for him. That present will be given to Benedict as part of President Obama's visit to the Vatican tomorrow.
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Holy smokes! We're in the middle of Passover and Easter is nigh. That's reason this week to get our head and soul together with music of a decidedly spiritual, life-affirming nature. Why, even His Holiness Pope John Paul II is getting down and into the album-making act with "Abba Pater," a pilgrimage of the spirit inspired by the Great Jubilee of the year 2000. It's also, we suspect, an artful outreach from the public-relations office of the Vatican, intended to make the church seem more relevant to younger people.
NEWS
September 10, 1987 | New York Daily News
Although the Pope will say only one Sunday mass during his 10-day U.S. visit, don't look for it on television. NFL football will block live network coverage of the mass this Sunday from San Antonio on both CBS and NBC. "We had made it clear to the Pope's people that we'd be interested in covering the mass if it could be held earlier in the day," said Lane Venardos, executive producer for CBS coverage. "But that was not possible, so we opt not to carry the mass. Football is football.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | by Karen Armstrong
The pope's visit to the Holy Land seemed to be a game of political football, with both the Israelis and the Palestinians claiming he was rooting for their team. When John Paul II arrived in Jerusalem, the Israeli president, Ezer Weizman, welcomed him to "the eternal and indivisible capital of the State of Israel" - an unequivocal assertion of Israel's determination to maintain total sovereignty over the Holy City. Likewise, when the pope kissed a bowl of Palestinian soil - a gesture usually observed on visits to sovereign states - it led Suha Arafat, the wife of the Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat, to exclaim: "Everybody from our Palestinian people understood it as asking for a Palestinian independent state.
NEWS
December 17, 1997 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
When Pope John Paul II arrives Jan. 21 in the fiefdom of Fidel, Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua of Philadelphia won't be far behind. Bevilacqua and other United States cardinals will join the pope in Cuba for a trip that lasts through Jan. 25. The historic visit grew out of a Vatican meeting last year between the pope and President Fidel Castro. Bevilacqua doesn't expect to take in many of the sights on that long off-limits island where Castro has sought to shut down the Catholic church since seizing power in 1960.
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NEWS
July 9, 2016
ISSUE | CHURCH Communion questionnaire So Philadelphia Archbishop Charles Chaput gets to decide for the disenfranchised Catholics of Philadelphia what Pope Francis clearly did not say in Amoris Laetitia ? The sheer arrogance and un-Christian attitude of Chaput continue to stun (" Chaput edict scorned, praised ," Thursday). One can only cling to the belief that Jesus never intended Communion be reserved for the few and the chaste. Funny, there were no questions posed about "state of grace" at the Last Supper.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
High-end furniture maker Thos. Moser, which made the wooden chairs that Pope Francis used at Independence Hall and Philadelphia International Airport during his visit last year, is returning to Center City. Moser will move into a 2,900-square-foot store at 1605 Walnut St., beside a busy Apple store. Its lease there extends the corridor's hot streak. Other recent arrivals include eyewear company Warby Parker and New York-based fashion brand Rag & Bone. Moser plans a soft launch in the first half of August and a grand opening in late September.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Four Southwest Philadelphia men were found guilty Monday of various charges in the 2013 kidnapping and attempted murder of a man lured into a drug sale after he won several thousand dollars at SugarHouse Casino in Fishtown. The Common Pleas Court jury of nine women and three men deliberated for six days, after hearing three weeks of testimony, before returning guilty verdicts against Christopher Cooley, 33; Timothy Gooden, 38; Shaheed Smith, 37; and Kylieff Brown, 28, in the Dec. 8, 2013 incident involving Kevin Slaughter.
NEWS
June 10, 2016
By Elbridge Colby Recent events in Rome indicate that some influential figures in the Vatican want Pope Francis to use his next encyclical to jettison the "just war" theory as the way the church determines whether or not it is moral to go to war. In particular, they urge that the church replace this age-old model - which focuses on determining a fight's justifiability by the degree to which it complies with criteria like necessity, likelihood of...
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Saying "one of my weaknesses is that I don't speak Spanish," Archbishop Charles J. Chaput on Tuesday announced the appointment of Monsignor Edward M. Deliman as the newest auxiliary bishop of Philadelphia, with a mission to serve its large Hispanic community. Deliman, who is of Slovakian ancestry, committed himself to learning Spanish as a young priest and has devoted much of his 43-year career to urban and Hispanic ministry. He will be formally consecrated a bishop Aug. 18 at the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul.
NEWS
May 27, 2016
THE DAUGHTER SAYS she wants to visit in July. "What can I get ready?" I ask. Bail money, she jokes. She's in Bernie's bag and is coming to visit her old Dad, but mainly to be outside the Wells Fargo Center to keep the Democratic National Convention fair, which is like keeping pro wrestling honest. Sanders has promised(?), suggested(?), threatened(?) that the convention will be "messy" if he's shut out. What does that mean? In the committees? On the convention floor? On Broad Street?
NEWS
May 5, 2016
By Simone Campbell When the Bernie Sanders campaign announced plans to visit the Vatican, more than one journalist asked me for comment on the oddity of a progressive candidate seeking to associate himself with an institution whose views are antithetical to much of what he espouses. This, I believe, is a fundamental misunderstanding of how the majority of Catholics in America view the role of their faith in their political and civic life. Call it the Pope Francis effect. It is real and, because Catholics are the preeminent swing voters, it will matter a great deal.
NEWS
April 15, 2016
By Joseph Curran Popular as he is, Pope Francis cannot seem to win with some people. For conservative Catholics, he goes too far; for liberals, he does not go far enough. The pope's recent apostolic exhortation, Amoris Laetitia , wades into some of the most fraught issues in Catholicism and modern life - divorce and remarriage, the definition of marriage itself, and the status of gay people in the church. For many conservatives, Francis' attempts to reach out with mercy and flexibility to those living in morally complex and difficult situations seem likely to weaken the church's moral authority.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
ISSUE | POPE FRANCIS Not enough 'joy' The title " Amoris Laetitia ," or "The Joy of Love," seems strange for a document by Pope Francis that calls "irregular" relationships emblematic of those who live in an "imperfect manner" ("Pope urges compassion for gays, divorced," Saturday). Love is a loose term, and joy is an emotional reaction for those who are no longer distressed, angered, frightened, or disgusted by being judged "irregular" and "imperfect. " Compassion without celebration remains a form of denigration.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Pope Francis on Friday issued a much-anticipated document on family that overturns no major teachings of the Catholic Church, but calls on its clergy to be compassionate and to welcome divorced-and-remarried couples, gays, and those who live in an "imperfect manner. " The church and its clergy have been "wasting pastoral energy on denouncing a decadent world without proactively proposing ways to finding true happiness," Francis wrote in the document, titled "Amoris Laetitia ," or "The Joy of Love.
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