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Poppy

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NEWS
September 27, 2004
While arguments continue over which presidential contender can win the "war on terror," not enough is being said about another "war" on one of its battlefields. In Afghanistan, long a focal point and problem spot of the "war on drugs," the situation has gotten worse. The U.S. State Department reports that Afghanistan is on pace to produce a record opium poppy crop this year. Afghanistan is already estimated by the United Nations to produce three-quarters of the world's opium.
NEWS
February 2, 2007 | By Anne Applebaum
NATO is fighting a war to eradicate opium from Afghanistan. Western governments are spending hundreds of millions of dollars bulldozing poppy fields, building up counternarcotics squads, and financing alternative crops. Chemical spraying may begin as early as this spring. Opium exports account for somewhere between one-third and two-thirds of the country's gross domestic product, depending on whose statistics you believe. The biggest producers are in the southern provinces, where the Taliban is at its strongest, and no wonder: Every time a poppy field is destroyed, a poor person becomes poorer - and more likely to support the Taliban against the Western forces who wrecked his crops.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the Outback, a buffalo herder snarls. Politicians? "I don't like any of them," he says. In Surfers Paradise on Australia's Gold Coast, a real estate man shakes his head. "People just don't trust them any longer," he says. In Humpty Doo outside of Darwin, a buffalo catcher is not coy about his opinion of politicians. "I've never got a straight answer from any I've met," he says. In Brisbane, a politician named Michael Macklin says such critics are too kind.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | By Tim Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The poppies, row on row, stand waist-high by the roadside east of town. The boll of each plant oozes a thick brown sap. A fat boy scrapes the sap off each boll into a burlap sack. The ooze is opium. At a mud fort in the mountains, the opium becomes heroin. And half the heroin coursing through the veins of American addicts comes from the poppy fields of Afghanistan. The Afghan crop now coming in could yield 200 tons of heroin. It is an especially bitter harvest for the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Poppy (Sally Hawkins) is cycling 'round London town, waving at pedestrians, merrily dodging cars, her face abeam. In the opening minutes of Mike Leigh's oddball and ingenious Happy-Go-Lucky , we already know a lot about its protagonist: She's upbeat, friendly, indomitable. Either that, or she's totally stoned. So Poppy, who turns out to be 30, single, a school teacher (and not stoned, although she partakes now and then), locks her bike to a railing. She trots off to a book shop.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | By Kathryn Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
On Mother's Day, far from Bucks County, activist and artist Peter Tinsman shot to death his 3-year-old daughter, Poppy, then ended his own life with the same gun. Five months later, Poppy's mother, artist Pam Gruno, is still coming to terms with the loss of her only child. She has chosen to cope with her grief in a most creative way - through a theater piece called Fire Journey, which will be performed Friday and Saturday at the Community Education Center in Philadelphia. Gruno and a friend, performance artist Rocky Wilson, who knew Poppy only a few months but grew close to the lively little girl, have woven dance, music, poetry and storytelling into a work that is full of love and healing.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | For The Inquirer / JON ADAMS
Exchange students Ekaterina Mineeva (left) of Russia and Gvantsa Apkhazava of Georgia share a poppy roll dessert during a party for foreign students. The Sept. 26 party was at the Fallsington home of teacher Fran Kurz, who placed 12 students in the area. The students cooked dishes from their native lands. Among those at the party were students from Hungary, Brazil and Japan.
NEWS
July 3, 2011 | By Tim Johnson, McClatchy Newspapers
EL DURAZNO, Mexico - Mexico's heroin industry has had a bullish few years, and for traffickers the outlook is as uplifting as the scarlet, orange and yellow poppy flowers from which the narcotic is processed. What was once a problem largely confined to hubs in California and Texas has expanded into the Midwest and the Atlantic Seaboard, narcotics experts say. Using savvy marketing tactics, they've also repositioned heroin commercially, revamping its image from the inner-city drug of yore, with its junkies and needles, into a narcotic that can be snorted or smoked, appealing to suburban and even rural high school youth.
NEWS
December 17, 2004 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
Like professional golfers, collectors start their season in the South and work north. The coin season starts when buyers and sellers converge on Fort Lauderdale, Fla., for auctions bracketing the 50th Florida United Numismatists convention, Jan. 12-15. Bowers & Merena will set the ball rolling Jan. 9 with a sale offering Morgan dollars, 14 of which are graded proof, and many dollars from mints in New Orleans, Carson City, Nev., and San Francisco. The sale includes the James W. Lull collection, which has many coins graded "Finest known.
NEWS
October 16, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
Perky people always have something upbeat to say, a cheerful hello to issue, a compliment to drop. In times such as these, they are a beacon of light in a storm-tossed sea of bitterness, anger, darkness. So why do we hate them? It's a question that hovers over "Happy Go Lucky," an oddball British movie that makes a courageous attempt to profile a woman who lives up to the title, always, in every situation. Like Spongebob, only human. I say courageous because any sort of comprehensive movie biography carries the implication of, at the very least, mood change.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 20, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poppy Livers, a Villanova cocaptain and the team's leading returning receiver, has the same conversation almost every day with 'Nova receivers coach Brian Flinn. "He tells me I'm 5-[foot-]3 every day," Livers said Monday at Villanova's media day. "His favorite thing to say is: 'You wake up with leverage on other people.' " In fact, Livers said, it was Flinn who noticed that a walk-on, officially listed at 5-foot-7, belonged on the field. "He didn't care if I was black, white, green - 6 feet," Livers said.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - One teenager made offensive comments about a murdered child on Twitter. Another young man wrote on Facebook that British soldiers should "go to hell. " A third posted a picture of a burning paper poppy, symbol of remembrance of war dead. All were arrested, two convicted, and one jailed - and they're not the only ones. In Britain, hundreds of people are prosecuted each year for posts, tweets, texts and emails deemed menacing, indecent, offensive or obscene, and the number is growing as our online lives expand.
SPORTS
October 23, 2012 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to Saturday's 49-24 win at Georgia State, Villanova is 6-2 and tied for first place with New Hampshire in the Colonial Athletic Association with a 4-1 mark. The Wildcats, vying for a Football Championship Subdivision playoff berth, also are ranked in both the FCS coaches poll and the Sports Network FCS poll for the first time this season. Villanova made its debut in the coaches poll at No. 23 Monday after being in the "receiving votes" category last week. The Wildcats are 19th in the Sports Network FCS poll after being ranked 24th last week.
NEWS
July 3, 2011 | By Tim Johnson, McClatchy Newspapers
EL DURAZNO, Mexico - Mexico's heroin industry has had a bullish few years, and for traffickers the outlook is as uplifting as the scarlet, orange and yellow poppy flowers from which the narcotic is processed. What was once a problem largely confined to hubs in California and Texas has expanded into the Midwest and the Atlantic Seaboard, narcotics experts say. Using savvy marketing tactics, they've also repositioned heroin commercially, revamping its image from the inner-city drug of yore, with its junkies and needles, into a narcotic that can be snorted or smoked, appealing to suburban and even rural high school youth.
NEWS
June 7, 2011 | Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - A NATO service member was killed yesterday in southern Afghanistan, where violence is increasing as the poppy harvest ends and the Taliban turns opium profits into payments for fighters. In the southern province of Helmand, the world's leading opium producer and the Taliban's profit center, NATO officials say insurgents are regrouping and fighting to retake key cities and towns they lost during clearing operations by U.S. Marines during the past year. In Sangin, where nearly a third of all British Afghan war casualties have taken place, Taliban insurgent commanders have retrenched and are answering U.S. Marines' latest offensives with stiff resistance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2009
SNEAKING vegetables into casseroles is a great way to make meals healthier, and that's one of the things I did with today's recipe for poppy-seed chicken. I saw a version of this chicken in the Red Hat Society cookbook, but after looking at the ingredient list - which included a stick of butter, lots of sour cream and a whole sleeve of buttery crackers - I didn't even want to try that recipe. When I did the math on it, one serving had 438 calories and 30 fat grams. If you ate a fried chicken breast from KFC instead, you'd save 68 calories and 9 fat grams.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Poppy (Sally Hawkins) is cycling 'round London town, waving at pedestrians, merrily dodging cars, her face abeam. In the opening minutes of Mike Leigh's oddball and ingenious Happy-Go-Lucky , we already know a lot about its protagonist: She's upbeat, friendly, indomitable. Either that, or she's totally stoned. So Poppy, who turns out to be 30, single, a school teacher (and not stoned, although she partakes now and then), locks her bike to a railing. She trots off to a book shop.
NEWS
October 16, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
Perky people always have something upbeat to say, a cheerful hello to issue, a compliment to drop. In times such as these, they are a beacon of light in a storm-tossed sea of bitterness, anger, darkness. So why do we hate them? It's a question that hovers over "Happy Go Lucky," an oddball British movie that makes a courageous attempt to profile a woman who lives up to the title, always, in every situation. Like Spongebob, only human. I say courageous because any sort of comprehensive movie biography carries the implication of, at the very least, mood change.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"Cut it out!" Backstage at the PNC Bank Arts Center, Miranda Lambert is laying down the law. As usual, the object of her wrath - in this case, Delilah, the "terrier-slash-whatever mix" who's yipping at a visitor to the country starlet's tour bus - falls meekly into line. That's one smart doggie. For if the mutt has been listening closely to her master's work - like the 2005 hit CD debut Kerosene, and its follow-up, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, which topped the country charts on its release in May - she's learned an unmistakable lesson: Miranda Lambert don't take no mess.
NEWS
February 2, 2007 | By Anne Applebaum
NATO is fighting a war to eradicate opium from Afghanistan. Western governments are spending hundreds of millions of dollars bulldozing poppy fields, building up counternarcotics squads, and financing alternative crops. Chemical spraying may begin as early as this spring. Opium exports account for somewhere between one-third and two-thirds of the country's gross domestic product, depending on whose statistics you believe. The biggest producers are in the southern provinces, where the Taliban is at its strongest, and no wonder: Every time a poppy field is destroyed, a poor person becomes poorer - and more likely to support the Taliban against the Western forces who wrecked his crops.
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