CollectionsPopular Music
IN THE NEWS

Popular Music

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
It's possible, for example, to listen to Sly and the Family Stone's "Everyday People" on oldies radio and appreciate the song without realizing how daring its message of racial harmony was when it was released in tumultuous 1968. It's possible to enjoy one of Miles Davis' mournful, muted trumpet solos and know nothing of what drove him to the sound. It's possible to get a vague feeling for Robert Johnson's circumstances by hearing his odd-bar blues, yet still to misunderstand his life and times.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jazz? In church? On Good Friday? The Gabriels Jazz Band will swing into "Everything I Have Is Yours" and other songs during Good Friday services at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church on April 21. The band, which will also play "Who Can I Turn To" and "Someone to Watch Over Me," is led by a cool, bluesy piano player known in the Philadelphia jazz scene as "the Padre. " And no wonder. He is the Rev. Warren Davis, 72, a retired Episcopal priest. "People tell us that they have found a new and deeper meaning in the words of these familiar songs," Father Davis said.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
Inquirer popular music critic Dan DeLuca has been reporting from the SXSW music festival in Austin, Texas. See his dispatches, including photographs and videos, on his blog, "In the Mix," at .
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Aldo A. Provenzano, 68, who went from South Philadelphia cello player to composer and arranger of pop music for such well-known performers as Al Martino, died Saturday at Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Marlton. He had lived in Cherry Hill for 28 years before moving to Marlton last month. Mr. Provenzano played cello in the South Philadelphia High School orchestra under director Jay Speck and later founded the Jay Speck Scholarship Foundation, which provides aid to alumni of the high school who pursue musical careers.
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | By Melissa Milewski, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Throughout July, the Delaware County Summer Festival will continue its 22d annual celebration in Rose Tree Park with a play by a theater company, and local musicians playing show tunes and country and popular music. The Atlantic Brass Band, a British-style band that plays marches and popular music, will take the stage Wednesday. In the event of rain, the location will be Penncrest High School in Middletown off Route 352. The Rose Tree Shakespeare Company will put on Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors in a contemporary setting, a Southern California beach in the 1960s, next Thursday and July 11-12.
NEWS
February 28, 1986 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
Like two slow-moving trains passing in a tunnel, the trumpets of Grammy Award-winner Wynton Marsalis and 17-year-old Lorne Hammond answered each other yesterday, moaning blow for moaning blow. Hammond, a senior at Overbrook High School, was getting the benefit of a one-on-one lesson from Marsalis, one of the most versatile and honored young trumpet players around. Marsalis, whose jazz group won a Grammy Tuesday night, spent nearly three hours at Overbrook High School yesterday talking to students about music, signing autographs and kissing the cheeks of squealing young female students.
NEWS
April 16, 2007
GONE ARE THE DAYS when, listening to popular music, you would only hear songs of love from the likes of James Ingram, Gloria Lynn, Nancy Wilson, Frank Sinatra, and I could go on and on. Also gone are the days when some people would enjoy themselves at places like Lawnside, partaking of good music and good food. What's now being offered are songs telling us to kill one another. Also, we hear a great deal about what foods, such as pork, not to eat. Perhaps if people could go back to enjoying life, this hatred and madness would stop.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
No matter that Tempesta di Mare has been giving enterprising concerts at venues as prestigious as New York's Frick Collection and making good recordings for the Chandos label. For its debut at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater on Saturday, the Philadelphia baroque orchestra hatched a red-letter-day program that at times took the group too far from its comfort zone. Titled Apollo at Play , the program had its best moments in repertoire in which yester-era gods were a more immediate presence in the culture's mythology, namely works from the 18th century, when plays and operas were full of mythical figures treated with the casualness of distant relatives rather than lofty deities.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Jimmy Amadie, the renowned Philadelphia jazz pianist and music educator who recorded nine albums despite suffering from severe tendonitis that prevented him from performing live for 44 years, has died. He was 76. Mr. Amadie, who grew up in the Tioga section of North Philadelphia and lived in Bala Cynwyd, was diagnosed with lung cancer (though he never smoked) in 2007. He died on Tuesday at Penn Hospice in Center City. "Philadelphia has been the home base for some extremely significant jazz artists," said guitarist Pat Martino.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | By J. Bryan Lowder, SLATE
According to a new study from researchers at the Spanish National Research Council, the familiar complaint that contemporary popular music has grown loud, predictable, and simpler than ever may be exactly right. While one must be skeptical of quantitative music studies, the analysis may have a point, even if the portrait it paints is incomplete. The study's analysts ran 464,411 recordings in all popular-music genres from the period of 1955 to 2010 (called the "Million Song Dataset")
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Paul McCartney, Irving Berlin, and Leonard Bernstein all wrote high-profile music that wasn't entirely theirs. They use orchestrators (Bernstein in West Side Story ), musical secretaries (Irving Berlin), and even collaborators (McCartney's concert works) to help get their thoughts on paper. But then, all three are most famous for their popular music, in which a composer's musical ambitions may outstretch the mechanics of bringing it into being. A classical composer, in contrast, is supposed to be a romantic lone artist communing with the muses - not recycling music from an unused film score or a deceased colleague.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
Inquirer popular music critic Dan DeLuca has been reporting from the SXSW music festival in Austin, Texas. See his dispatches, including photographs and videos, on his blog, "In the Mix," at .
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Rock-and-roll music embodies the spirit of several generations, which is to say raucous and sometimes transgressive behavior by both musicians and their fans, idol worship and mass hysteria. These effects have been observed before, particularly in young people - remember crooners and bobby-soxers? - but rock-and-roll has been an especially persistent and powerful shaper of popular culture. Why else would public television still be reviving musical acts from the 1960s to solicit contributions during periodic fund drives?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2011 | By Ricardo Baca, DENVER POST
The soundtrack for O Brother, Where Art Thou celebrates its 10th anniversary this month with a fresh reissue that debuts Tuesday. The music that scored the Coen Brothers' Depression-era adaptation of Homer's Odyssey changed popular music in a big way, bringing old-timey mountain music to the forefront of America's pop market for the first time in decades. And we're still feeling the soundtrack's influence. Would the masses have been ready for roots-minded crossover acts Mumford & Sons, Old Crow Medicine Show, the Civil Wars, or the Avett Brothers had it not been for the brave, game-changing appeal of O Brother ?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|