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NEWS
October 1, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among America's 10 biggest cities, an examination of federal data by The Inquirer shows. The city is already the poorest in that group. Deep poverty is measured as income of 50 percent or less of the poverty rate. A family of four living in deep poverty takes in $12,000 or less annually, half the poverty rate of $24,000 for a family that size. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.3 percent, or around 186,000 people - 60,000 of whom are children, an examination of the newly released U.S. Census 2014 American Community Survey shows.
NEWS
December 15, 1991 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
Montgomery County is starting to show a few gray hairs. With more senior citizens opting to stay in the county and more younger people choosing to move away, the county's average age is just under 36 years, the highest in the state, according to Steve Nelson of the Montgomery County Planning Commission. That was just one of the conclusions the senior planner drew in a report prepared using 1990 Census data and discussed at Wednesday's monthly meeting. According to census figures, there was a 32.8 percent increase (from 32,827 to 43,589)
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | by Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
New demographic estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show Philadelphia losing 22,000 black residents in the 1990s, as well as 165,000 whites. Those population losses were partially offset by growth among city residents with Hispanic and Asian ancestors, the figures indicate. "No surprises there," said David Bartelt, chair of Temple University's geography and urban studies department. "It's really clear the white population in Philadelphia has been declining completely, in absolute terms and as a proportion of the population.
NEWS
June 25, 1995
The nation's poverty rate has remained quite stable since 1970 - it was 13.5 percent in 1990 - but the number of people living in areas of concentrated poverty has grown sharply. Such communities are those in which at least 40 percent of the population is poor and lack the resources and opportunities of other areas. In 1970, that number was 3.8 million people. By 1980, the number had reached 5.6 million. By 1990, it was 10.4 million. Although metropolitan areas contain most of these communities, it is people living outside major urban areas - in small and midsize cities - who make up the largest single segment of the nation's extreme-poverty communities.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Dylan Purcell and Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia's population grew for the eighth year in a row in 2014, and surrounding counties were mostly stable, according to new census data, but the picture was not quite as rosy at it may have seemed in the nation's fifth-largest city. Philadelphia's population rose an estimated 4,245 to 1,560,297, the census found, aiding a trend that has helped reverse decades of declines. By the end of 2014, there were 34,291 more people in Philadelphia than when census takers knocked on doors in 2010.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1991 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every marketer fantasizes about selling to the massive baby-boom generation. But the latest census numbers in New Jersey show there's more to sales than boomers. Data released last week by the U.S. Census Bureau show that in New Jersey the number of people 75 and older grew at a faster pace in the 1980s than baby boomers, ages 25 to 44. "People are living longer," said Connie O. Hughes, a demographer with the New Jersey Labor Department. "There are all kinds of implications" for businesses and others as the population grows older, she said.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
LAKEWOOD, N.J. - A crowded city like nothing New Jersey has ever seen is rising over this once sleepy Ocean County township, and its neighbors are on edge. In adjacent Toms River, those tensions started in late 2014 when bearded men in wide hats began knocking on doors. They had friends in Brooklyn, they said, who would pay top dollar for the houses. "The guy who came around our street called himself 'Charles from Brooklyn,' " homeowner Laurie Venditto recalled. He "must have been here 20 or 30 times" to tell her and others on Hunters Court that his fellow Haredi Jews were moving in. "He said we wouldn't want to live here when he was done," Venditto recalled, speaking in the ground-floor office of her corner home.
NEWS
March 6, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - It was 2004 when Lorraine McCarthy, a full-time resident of this Cape May County resort, sold her duplex a block from the boardwalk and decamped to the mainland. "The choice we made to move off the barrier island was the same choice that a lot of people who wanted to make some money made," said McCarthy, who lives in nearby Upper Township. "It was the best time to sell. " The Jersey Shore's real estate boom, it now seems, had a more profound effect on the region's population than many realized.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The nation's population now exceeds 245 million people, the Census Bureau reported yesterday. It attributed the growth to a combination of continued strong immigration and an increase in the natural growth of the population. As of Jan. 1 the population was 245,110,000 people, the bureau said, up from 242,825,000 a year earlier. Contributing were the natural growth of 1.7 million last year, resulting from 3.8 million births minus 2.1 million deaths, and an estimated 600,000 immigrant arrivals, the bureau said.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
Thank God for Baltimore and Washington, D.C. New data on big-city population growth or losses during the 1990s released yesterday by the federal government show that while Philadelphia is one of just seven of America's 25 cities to lose people, the dropoff hasn't been as severe as for its mid-Atlantic neighbors. Philadelphia's loss of 9.4 percent of its population from 1990 to 1998 - fewer than 150,000 people - wasn't as bad as Baltimore's 12.4 percent decline or the 13.8-percent drop for the District of Columbia, the Census Bureau reported.
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NEWS
August 16, 2016
By Brian Blase Washington experts have been frequently wrong about the Affordable Care Act. They projected far more enrollees in ACA exchanges than materialized. They also projected that the individual insurance market would stabilize in 2016 with robust competition. Instead, the country is grappling with enormous premium hikes and fewer choices. A new government report reveals perhaps the largest mistake yet: Medicaid enrollees who gained coverage through the ACA cost almost 50 percent more, on average, than the government projected just one year ago. ACA supporters often point to Medicaid expansion as the law's greatest success since it reduced the overall uninsurance rate.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Daniel Block, Staff Writer
Run-down buildings line the borough's pockmarked downtown streets, bordering sidewalks cracked by weeds. Montgomery County is one of the wealthiest in the state, but Pottstown, one of its biggest municipalities, looks more like the town that prosperity forgot. Thus the opening of a newly constructed bank branch on High Street constitutes a major event for a town with high aspirations for revival. "You don't see a lot of brick-and-mortar bank branches being opened these days," said Steve Bamford, executive director of Pottstown Area Industrial Development.
TRAVEL
July 4, 2016
Answer: Manchester. Its population of about 110,000 is nearly a 10th of the entire state population of roughly 1.3 million. Concord, the state capital, has about 42,000 residents.  
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
DRESDEN, Germany - About 2,000 Germans gathered in the market square in this elegant old town to denounce Angela Merkel as a traitor - and to cheer Britain on for deciding to leave the European Union. They were taking part in the regular Monday demonstrations of Pegida, the German acronym for Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamization of the West. The Pegida crowd was waving the banners of Germany and the free state of Saxony along with signs saying "Thank you, Brexit. " I asked a group of middle-aged men in polo shirts, slacks, and sandals, all workers in a machinery plant, why they were there.
NEWS
June 27, 2016
LONDON - How fitting. As the Brits cast a stunning vote to quit the European Union, Donald Trump was opening a luxury golf course in Scotland and crowing that Britain did "a great thing. " This historic victory for the British Brexiteers is part of a nationalist trend that is gripping Europe and has spread across the Atlantic. The leader of the "Leave" campaign, the blond, mop-haired Boris Johnson, is a bombastic Trump clone who defied his Conservative Party's leader, Prime Minister David Cameron.
NEWS
May 25, 2016
From the coverage of the 2016 campaign, you would think that American workers battered by economic change have finally won their moment in the political sun. After all, Donald Trump is said to be the paladin of white, blue-collar men, and Bernie Sanders speaks unabashedly about the working class, a term many have (wrongly) written off as an antique concept out of 1930s black-and-white movies. But media interest in policy initiatives that would benefit those who are struggling is scarce.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
The average stay in Philadelphia jails drags on 95 days, four times the national average. Per capita, the city has more than twice as many inmates as the national average. And though fewer violent crimes were committed in 2015 than in 1985, the jail population has doubled. Last month, the city's criminal-justice practitioners - courts, prosecutors, defenders, and others - vowed to change that. Through reforms funded by a $3.5 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation, they aim to reduce the jail population, about 7,500, by 34 percent in three years.
NEWS
May 4, 2016
'When you become famous," the famous political consultant James Carville once said, "being famous becomes your profession. " It's a sign of the stunning success of Donald Trump's crossover act that we no longer even think about this campaign's most revolutionary effect on our politics: the demolition of the line between celebrity and political achievement. Of course, success in politics can itself breed celebrity. Carville earned his by combining his eccentric sense of humor with actual skill in helping Bill Clinton become president in 1992.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
LAKEWOOD, N.J. - A crowded city like nothing New Jersey has ever seen is rising over this once sleepy Ocean County township, and its neighbors are on edge. In adjacent Toms River, those tensions started in late 2014 when bearded men in wide hats began knocking on doors. They had friends in Brooklyn, they said, who would pay top dollar for the houses. "The guy who came around our street called himself 'Charles from Brooklyn,' " homeowner Laurie Venditto recalled. He "must have been here 20 or 30 times" to tell her and others on Hunters Court that his fellow Haredi Jews were moving in. "He said we wouldn't want to live here when he was done," Venditto recalled, speaking in the ground-floor office of her corner home.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The economic clout of women-owned businesses in the Philadelphia region ranks 48th among the 50 largest U.S. metropolitan areas, according to a study released this week by American Express. Economic clout is a composite of growth in the number of women-owned firms, their revenue growth, and their employment growth since 2007. The Philadelphia metropolitan region, including Southeastern Pennsylvania, South Jersey, and parts of Delaware and Maryland ranked 44th for growth in the number of firms, 46th in revenue growth, and 36th in employment growth.
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