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NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Dylan Purcell and Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia's population grew for the eighth year in a row in 2014, and surrounding counties were mostly stable, according to new census data, but the picture was not quite as rosy at it may have seemed in the nation's fifth-largest city. Philadelphia's population rose an estimated 4,245 to 1,560,297, the census found, aiding a trend that has helped reverse decades of declines. By the end of 2014, there were 34,291 more people in Philadelphia than when census takers knocked on doors in 2010.
NEWS
December 15, 1991 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
Montgomery County is starting to show a few gray hairs. With more senior citizens opting to stay in the county and more younger people choosing to move away, the county's average age is just under 36 years, the highest in the state, according to Steve Nelson of the Montgomery County Planning Commission. That was just one of the conclusions the senior planner drew in a report prepared using 1990 Census data and discussed at Wednesday's monthly meeting. According to census figures, there was a 32.8 percent increase (from 32,827 to 43,589)
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | by Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
New demographic estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show Philadelphia losing 22,000 black residents in the 1990s, as well as 165,000 whites. Those population losses were partially offset by growth among city residents with Hispanic and Asian ancestors, the figures indicate. "No surprises there," said David Bartelt, chair of Temple University's geography and urban studies department. "It's really clear the white population in Philadelphia has been declining completely, in absolute terms and as a proportion of the population.
NEWS
June 25, 1995
The nation's poverty rate has remained quite stable since 1970 - it was 13.5 percent in 1990 - but the number of people living in areas of concentrated poverty has grown sharply. Such communities are those in which at least 40 percent of the population is poor and lack the resources and opportunities of other areas. In 1970, that number was 3.8 million people. By 1980, the number had reached 5.6 million. By 1990, it was 10.4 million. Although metropolitan areas contain most of these communities, it is people living outside major urban areas - in small and midsize cities - who make up the largest single segment of the nation's extreme-poverty communities.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1991 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every marketer fantasizes about selling to the massive baby-boom generation. But the latest census numbers in New Jersey show there's more to sales than boomers. Data released last week by the U.S. Census Bureau show that in New Jersey the number of people 75 and older grew at a faster pace in the 1980s than baby boomers, ages 25 to 44. "People are living longer," said Connie O. Hughes, a demographer with the New Jersey Labor Department. "There are all kinds of implications" for businesses and others as the population grows older, she said.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The nation's population now exceeds 245 million people, the Census Bureau reported yesterday. It attributed the growth to a combination of continued strong immigration and an increase in the natural growth of the population. As of Jan. 1 the population was 245,110,000 people, the bureau said, up from 242,825,000 a year earlier. Contributing were the natural growth of 1.7 million last year, resulting from 3.8 million births minus 2.1 million deaths, and an estimated 600,000 immigrant arrivals, the bureau said.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
Thank God for Baltimore and Washington, D.C. New data on big-city population growth or losses during the 1990s released yesterday by the federal government show that while Philadelphia is one of just seven of America's 25 cities to lose people, the dropoff hasn't been as severe as for its mid-Atlantic neighbors. Philadelphia's loss of 9.4 percent of its population from 1990 to 1998 - fewer than 150,000 people - wasn't as bad as Baltimore's 12.4 percent decline or the 13.8-percent drop for the District of Columbia, the Census Bureau reported.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
A number of communities in the region's Pennsylvania suburbs, notably in Chester and Montgomery Counties, grew substantially between April 2010 and July 2013, Census Bureau population estimates released Thursday show. In Chester County, there were noteworthy upticks in municipalities such as Malvern, West Chester, East Brandywine, and West Goshen, and the same was true in Chester/Delaware County border towns such as Bethel and Chadds Ford. In central Montgomery County, Upper Hanover, Towamencin, and Salford were among the burgeoning towns.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer
GREAT NEWS! Philadelphia has continued to grow since the 2010 census count, according to new data being released Thursday. The Census Bureau estimates that the city's population on July 1 was 1,536,471, an increase of 10,465 or a 0.7 percent jump from the official census count taken two years ago. The new estimates show that the city's growth spurt from April 2010 to July 2011 was mainly due to an increase in births. "This is very good news for the city of Philadelphia," Mayor Nutter said Wednesday by email.
NEWS
March 6, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - It was 2004 when Lorraine McCarthy, a full-time resident of this Cape May County resort, sold her duplex a block from the boardwalk and decamped to the mainland. "The choice we made to move off the barrier island was the same choice that a lot of people who wanted to make some money made," said McCarthy, who lives in nearby Upper Township. "It was the best time to sell. " The Jersey Shore's real estate boom, it now seems, had a more profound effect on the region's population than many realized.
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NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, the change has been visible at eye level: rowhouse and industrial neighborhoods south and north of Center City bulging with newcomers settling into once-forlorn pockets a bus ride away from City Hall. On Monday, the scope of that reinvigorating shift of reinvestment was made evident in numbers. A 7.7-square-mile section of central Philadelphia extending to South Philadelphia and Fishtown has grown so much over the last 15 years that now ranks second only to Midtown Manhattan when it comes to people living in the heart of a city.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moroccan immigrant Ali Hajjaji's business plan fills a notebook. But his back-of-a-napkin version is just a rectangle labeled "hub" and a handful of lines representing "stores" and "pick up points. " A master of cellphone repair, Hajjaji, 37, came to America in 2010 with a green card he won in the State Department's diversity lottery. He has worked for resellers and retailers, including RadioShack. Two months ago, he opened iSmartTech, his South Ninth Street shop amid the bump and bustle of the Italian Market, where broken phones are as common as cabbage.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond and Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writers
For Marjie Versagli, owner of Malvern Flowers & Gifts, this used to be peak season - prom corsages, Mother's Day bouquets. But that's changed. Now, she's busier year-round. About 20 miles away, the Lower Merion School District is in a building frenzy, adding a dozen classrooms and repurposing gymnasiums and other spaces to accommodate its largest enrollment increase in nearly 40 years. The blooming flower business and the Lower Merion crowding are symptomatic of the region's shifting demographics.
NEWS
April 3, 2015
IF WE Philadelphians have a fault, it's that we put our blinders on when it comes to the rest of the state. That's a mistake. We are the state's largest county, but there are 66 more. We are all in the same boat called the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and our fate locally is linked to the state's. Gov. Wolf understands this. His budget proposal doesn't target one area over another. He wants to create a rising tide for everyone, regardless of whether they live on Venango Street or in Venango County.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Dylan Purcell and Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia's population grew for the eighth year in a row in 2014, and surrounding counties were mostly stable, according to new census data, but the picture was not quite as rosy at it may have seemed in the nation's fifth-largest city. Philadelphia's population rose an estimated 4,245 to 1,560,297, the census found, aiding a trend that has helped reverse decades of declines. By the end of 2014, there were 34,291 more people in Philadelphia than when census takers knocked on doors in 2010.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1982, when Gloucester County planners drafted a framework for growth, one-fifth of the county's land was considered developed - a statistic perhaps best reflected in a slogan that would become the county's mantra: "Close to everything, far from it all. " Three decades later, almost a third of the county is developed. The 330-square-mile county's population has increased by more than 90,000, to about 290,000. Its portion of Route 55 went from plan to pavement. Washington Township's population almost doubled.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A position in the Camden County Jail that has faced high turnover will be filled on an interim level this month, making that person who fills it the sixth jail population manager since 2011. The move comes amid a vacancy in the position and a letter from U.S. District Judge Jerome Simandle, who told county officials on Jan. 26 that he was "very concerned" about the turnover. The jail population manager focuses on how inmates are processed, from arrest to court date, and makes recommendations on how to improve their movement in the system.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Soul of the South Television, which originates from Little Rock and targets an African American audience, will replace NBC programming on NBC40 at the Jersey Shore, a network official confirmed Wednesday. The NBC affiliation was to expire at midnight Wednesday. After that, Soul of the South programming takes over, said Matthew Mixon, vice president of sales and distribution for Soul of the South Television. The NBC40 news crew will not report for work to the TV studios on Thursday, NBC40 officials have said.
NEWS
December 13, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Concerned about the potential for exploitation as Pennsylvania's elderly population grows, a group appointed by the state Supreme Court has recommended wide-ranging legal changes to protect older people from neglect, abuse, and fraud. The 38-member group known as the Elder Law Task Force called for better training for judges about elder issues, criminal background checks for guardians, and training that includes information on ethics, a mandatory reporting requirement for financial institutions that suspect financial abuse, and an amendment to the state's Slayer Statute to prevent people convicted of abusing an elder from benefiting from their victim's estate.
REAL_ESTATE
November 2, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Among the topics that keep appearing on my radar screen are Philadelphia's efforts to attract younger, educated people, age 20 to 44. Eleven years ago, as city officials continued to digest 2000 U.S. Census data that showed the fifth population drop since 1950, the Pennsylvania Economy League (now the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia) hosted a discussion of ways to reverse the trend. The keynote speaker, as I recall, was the mayor of Austin, Texas, which had plenty of bright, upwardly mobile young things and could have sent Philadelphia its overflow.
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