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Population Growth

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NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By Hope Yen, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Hispanics accounted for more than half of the increase in the U.S. population over the last decade, exceeding estimates in most states and crossing a new census milestone: 50 million, or 1 in 6 Americans. Meanwhile, more than nine million Americans checked two or more race categories on their 2010 census forms, up 32 percent from 2000, a sign of burgeoning multiracial growth in a nation made up increasingly of minorities. The Census Bureau on Thursday released its first set of national-level findings from the 2010 count on race and migration, detailing a decade in which rapid minority growth, the aging of whites, and the housing boom and bust were the predominant story lines.
NEWS
May 19, 1987 | By NAFIS SADIK, The New York Times
As the world population passes the 5 billion mark this year, there is renewed debate, particularly in the United States, about the value of international efforts to change the pace of population growth. Some commentators are concerned because population is static or declining in the industrialized countries while it is soaring in many parts of the third world. Fearing that the West is committing a kind of demographic suicide, they implicitly argue for an increase in the number of births.
NEWS
July 13, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the world welcomed its five-billionth person last week, population experts expressed cautious optimism that progress was being made in dealing with the threat of overpopulation in some regions of the world. They pointed to success stories in China, the world's most populous country, which in the last 13 years has halved its growth rate by launching a major campaign for one-child families. They noted that Europe now has a dozen nations approaching zero population growth - the point at which a country's birth rate equals its death rate - causing their populations to level off. In a few countries, such as West Germany and Hungary, the population has actually begun to decline.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | By Stephanie Banchero, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
County officials estimate that by 2020, about 759,000 people will live in Montgomery County - a 12 percent increase from the estimated 678,000 people who resided in the county at the end of 1990. According to figures recently released by Montgomery County planners, the population will grow to about 716,000 by 2000, 745,000 by 2010 and 759,000 by 2020. This projected growth percentage is slightly above the estimated growth of the state during the same period, about 11 percent.
NEWS
March 15, 1986 | By Ben Wattenberg
How does the world work? Little noticed, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) has just issued a report that should change the way most people think it does. In brief, it changes the answer to this key question of our time: Does rapid population growth harm Third World nations? The old answer was, "Yes, it's a disaster. " The new answer is, "Uh, well maybe a little bit. " The document is titled, "Population Growth and Economic Development: Policy Questions. " It is the fruit of two years of work by a specially appointed panel of 15 eminent scholars.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond and Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writers
For Marjie Versagli, owner of Malvern Flowers & Gifts, this used to be peak season - prom corsages, Mother's Day bouquets. But that's changed. Now, she's busier year-round. About 20 miles away, the Lower Merion School District is in a building frenzy, adding a dozen classrooms and repurposing gymnasiums and other spaces to accommodate its largest enrollment increase in nearly 40 years. The blooming flower business and the Lower Merion crowding are symptomatic of the region's shifting demographics.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | By Jessica Mathews
Beyond the short-term fate of the Mideast peace process, the larger meaning of Israel's election and of the terror bombings that preceded and shaped it is that peace takes a lot of time. Fear and hatred die slowly. But time to reach stability is something the Middle East may not have enough of. For while Jews and Arabs inch toward a modus vivendi, with every political twist and turn minutely chronicled and analyzed, an unnoticed, silent thief is robbing economic growth and raising the prospect of political instability and active conflict.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With less than a month until school board elections, some Gloucester County residents will soon find out that they will be voting in different districts this year. Five new districts have been created, and the boundaries of some others have changed, said William Mead, an investigator with the county Board of Elections. The changes will go into effect tomorrow. The switch, which will bring the county's total of districts up to 223, began after the board of elections received letters from several municipal clerks asking for new districts because of population growth, Mead said.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During the boom-boom '80s, thousands of moving trucks pulled into newly minted homes in the Council Rock school district, making it the fastest- growing area in Bucks County. In the first years of the '90s, the frenetic home-building and population growth has shifted north to the Central Bucks School District, according to newly released population estimates for the four years of 1990 to 1994. The four municipalities experiencing the fastest relative growth in the county - Plumstead, Chalfont Borough, Buckingham and Warwick - are all in Central Bucks.
NEWS
May 15, 2002 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Democrats in Chester County are pitching this campaign cycle as the moment they will finally capitalize on population growth to dent the Republicans' grip on county politics. And they are pointing to the race in the new Sixth Congressional District as a key campaign - even though experts say they will have a tough fight because the GOP-controlled legislature created the district this year for one of their own, State Sen. Jim Gerlach. Still, experts say, the Democratic primary on Tuesday between Dan Wofford and Frank Thomas will help shape the terms under which the general election is contested.
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NEWS
September 20, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Even as the region continues to gain population in the next two decades, regional planners envision big gains in another area: protected open space. In fact, they would like to see those gains far outpace any population growth, from the current 550,000 acres in Philadelphia and its neighboring counties, to 1 million, or about 42 percent of all the region's land. But the population and development boom in Chester County - which expects to add nearly 150,000 residents by 2045, a 28 percent increase - could present challenges to that goal, and last week county officials began a two-year planning process to figure out how to manage that growth in one of the state's fastest-growing counties.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The economic clout of women-owned businesses in the Philadelphia region ranks 48th among the 50 largest U.S. metropolitan areas, according to a study released this week by American Express. Economic clout is a composite of growth in the number of women-owned firms, their revenue growth, and their employment growth since 2007. The Philadelphia metropolitan region, including Southeastern Pennsylvania, South Jersey, and parts of Delaware and Maryland ranked 44th for growth in the number of firms, 46th in revenue growth, and 36th in employment growth.
NEWS
April 2, 2016
ISSUE | TERRORISM The price of comfort U.S. Rep. Brendan F. Boyle's commentary blames "militant Islamism" for the war that has produced terrorist attacks around the globe ("The defining struggle of this generation," Monday). Militant Islamism may be the most obvious explanation, but there's a much more significant underlying cause: The world is becoming divided into haves and have-nots, and the have-nots are increasingly not accepting this. Each year, about 25 percent of the world's resources are consumed by the 5 percent of the world's population that lives in the United States.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
The Philadelphia metropolitan region is lagging well behind the rest of the nation in population growth, new census numbers show. In the last five years, Philadelphia and its neighboring counties have lost tens of thousands of residents, but birthrates and an influx of immigrants have resulted in modest population increases. Still, the Philadelphia metro area - No. 4 a decade ago - has fallen to No. 7 in the U.S. population rankings, surpassed this year by Washington. If current rates continue, Philadelphia is set to drop even further within the next five years, overtaken by Miami and Atlanta.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond and Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writers
For Marjie Versagli, owner of Malvern Flowers & Gifts, this used to be peak season - prom corsages, Mother's Day bouquets. But that's changed. Now, she's busier year-round. About 20 miles away, the Lower Merion School District is in a building frenzy, adding a dozen classrooms and repurposing gymnasiums and other spaces to accommodate its largest enrollment increase in nearly 40 years. The blooming flower business and the Lower Merion crowding are symptomatic of the region's shifting demographics.
NEWS
April 3, 2015
IF WE Philadelphians have a fault, it's that we put our blinders on when it comes to the rest of the state. That's a mistake. We are the state's largest county, but there are 66 more. We are all in the same boat called the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and our fate locally is linked to the state's. Gov. Wolf understands this. His budget proposal doesn't target one area over another. He wants to create a rising tide for everyone, regardless of whether they live on Venango Street or in Venango County.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
A story Thursday about population growth in Philadelphia incorrectly gave the latest estimate of the city's population. The city had 1,553,165 residents as of 2013, according to the census.
NEWS
October 24, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
William J.T. Strahan did not need the U.S. Department of Labor to tell him how September's job situation stacked up. Strahan, executive vice president for human resources for Comcast Cable, already knew the score based on his company's experience: "Overall, hiring is slightly up. " And so it was nationwide, according to the Department of Labor's belated September job report. The nation's payrolls expanded by 148,000 jobs in September; the unemployment rate dropped slightly to 7.2 percent, from 7.3 percent, according to the report, which was delayed because of the federal government's shutdown.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
SUBURBAN SPRAWL, be damned! Lured by jobs, city amenities and the ability to get around without a car, more people are living in Center City, resulting in the rebound of a housing market severely damaged in the 2008-09 recession, according to a report released Tuesday by the Center City District and Central Philadelphia Development Corp. The population of "greater" Center City - 180,000 residents, living from river to river and from Tasker Street to Girard Avenue - soared 10.2 percent from 2000 to 2010, so that Philadelphia now has the third-largest downtown population among American cities (behind New York and Chicago)
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIJING - A government think tank is urging Chinese leaders to start phasing out China's one-child policy immediately and allow two children for every family by 2015, a daring proposal to do away with the unpopular policy. Some demographers see the timeline put forward by the China Development Research Foundation as a bold move by the body close to the central leadership. Others warn that the gradual approach, if implemented, would still be insufficient to help correct the problems that China's strict birth limits have created.
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