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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
October 7, 1995 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 18th and early 19th century, Philadelphia was famed for many crafts, notably furniture and silver. But it also boasted other artisan distinctions, including the first successful porcelain company established by one Ellis Tucker. Next Friday at the Ludwig's Corner Firehouse, Pook & Pook Inc. will offer three groupings of Tucker porcelain at the first session of its two-day fall- catalog sale, including a tea service in a so-called spider pattern. Just to stop any jokes about the sale being a Tucker-ware party, be it noted that the service, including a couple of dozen pieces, is likely to sell for $5,000 to $8,000, according to Pook & Pook's Ted Wiederseim.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
Eight relatives of a childless Baltimore couple will share a multimillion- dollar windfall as a result of the sale of hundreds of pieces of porcelain found in a tiny house in suburban Baltimore. Chinese porcelains collected in the 1940s and 1950s by Frederick J. and Antoinette H. Van Slyke were sold at auction last spring at Sotheby's in New York for $5.7 million. Many of the 201 pieces brought three to 10 times their estimates. This week, the Van Slykes' 18th-century European porcelain tableware and figure groups from such factories as Meissen, Fulda, Sevres and Vincennes are expected to bring an additional $1 million at Sotheby's.
LIVING
June 4, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The highest standards in porcelain have always been Chinese, and when you see the exhibition "Joined Colors" at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, you'll immediately understand why. These 79 pieces represent an extraordinary marriage of sublime form, exquisite decoration and brilliant color. "Joined Colors," which runs through Nov. 28, concerns itself with decoration and symbolism in imperial Chinese porcelain of the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. The discussion is somewhat technical at times, but the pieces themselves, many quite small, always pull you back to the level of pure delectation.
LIVING
September 30, 2005 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Auctions today and tomorrow could be the answer to the prayers of collectors of pewter and Roseville porcelain. In addition, a third sale tomorrow liquidating the real estate and contents of the Reading Holiness Camp Meeting Association will offer the chance to get some old-time religion. The pewter, five important pieces from the United States and Europe, is a highlight of the second session of a two-day antiques sale by Pook & Pook Inc. that will begin at 10 a.m. tomorrow at its Downingtown gallery, 463 E. Lancaster Ave. It's tempting to look down on pewter as the poor man's silver, and tomorrow's session also features lots of sterling, including a Reed & Barton seven-piece tea service made about 1937 and expected to sell for $12,000 to $18,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2000 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Glaciers may appear to be immobile, but they flow like highly viscous rivers, an improbable quality that Paula Winokur has captured in the porcelain sculptures she's showing at Helen Drutt Gallery. This series, inspired by a trip to Alaska, consists of wall-mounted and free-standing pieces. Typically, they juxtapose smooth, faceted sections with a furrowed part that suggests weathered ice moving down a slope. Although the sculptures are all white, Winokur has enlivened them by created several striking contrasts.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William J. Kazmar, 79, a blue-collar worker who became a renowned wildlife artist and porcelain art sculptor, died of heart failure Tuesday at John F. Kennedy Hospital in Atlantis, Fla. Mr. Kazmar lived in Collingswood, N.J., and had been vacationing in West Palm Beach, Fla. He was born in South Philadelphia. He joined his father making and restoring furniture when he was a teenager. After high school, he worked as a steamfitter at several local shipyards during World War II. After the war, Mr. Kazmar worked briefly as a machinist for Boeing Vertol and then opened an antiques and furniture restoration business with his wife, Barbara Mae Neville Kazmar, in Collingswood, where they lived for 52 years.
LIVING
January 26, 2007 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
Next week in Amsterdam, Sotheby's will begin selling 76,000 pieces of Chinese Export porcelain recovered from a circa 1725 shipwreck off the coast of present-day Vietnam. Because it was bound for the western market, the cargo reveals the era's fads and fashions in Europe, and precise details about the arduous journey made by goods in demand. The tale of the Cau Mau shipwreck involves connoisseurship, a treasure-hunting adventure suitable for television, and the legendary East India Trading Company (which itself has recently resurfaced in Pirates of the Caribbean dialogue)
LIVING
November 2, 1986 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
"I ate a fine meal at the Ritz from it last Sunday in London," said Capt. Michael Hatcher, referring to the Chinese porcelain that he, his partner Max de Rham and a team of divers brought up from the depths of the South China Sea in 1983. London's Ritz Hotel bought a service for 24 at the auction of Hatcher's porcelain in Amsterdam last spring, and the hotel now charges a premium when it uses the china for special dinners. Hatcher made his comment when he came to New York last month to promote the sale, at Bloomingdale's, of more china from the Nanking cargo.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: My father was given this 17-inch-high porcelain bird as payment for legal services in the 1920s or 1930s. I've no idea of its age or origin and would love to know its value, though I would never part with it. Answer: Your 19th-century polychrome, porcelain pheasant, symbolizing beauty and good fortune, was made in China specifically for export to the West. Your lone figurine - the birds were usually made in pairs - is worth around $1,000 to $1,200, said dealer Robert Mascarelli, co-author with his wife, Gloria, of Warman's Oriental Antiques (Wallace-Homestead)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2016
Porcelain A Memoir By Moby Penguin. 416 pp. $28 Reviewed by Katie Haegele In case you missed them, the rave and electronic music scenes of the late '80s and early '90s were about happiness and dancing and doing drugs that made you feel happy and want to dance. Eventually, things took a dark turn (that'd be the drugs), but it was essentially a good-natured milieu, a now-closed chapter in pop music history that began in the gay clubs of black and Latin New York but that is better remembered by the suburban kids with glow sticks who loved the same disco and funk records but who gave them their own, ya know, spin.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Moby is known for his sample-happy, ambient electronic albums, the biggest of which - 1999's Play , which has sold more than 10 million copies. Moby tracks were heard prominently in ads across the globe. This makes him a godfather to the current EDM scene, an early generation techno DJ whose "Go" was a rave-era sensation. Moby is also a vegan (with a new restaurant in California), an iced-tea purveyor, a Christian, and other things. He brings Porcelain , the first volume of his memoirs, to the Free Library on Thursday, May 19 . Porcelain closes before Moby becomes a household name.
NEWS
January 10, 2016
Journey Into an Obsession By Edmund de Waal Farrar, Strauss & Giroux. 403 pp. $27. Reviewed by Brian Thomas Gallagher It is rare for someone to write as well as Edmund de Waal, all the more as it's his secondary vocation. De Waal's first book, The Hare with Amber Eyes - which he humbly calls "my book about netsuke" - traces the path of a collection of those small, carved-wood Japanese figurines as it passes down through generations of his family. It is one of the best books I've read in the last 10 years, with a sweep of historical implication couched in a personal story of artistic mystery.
NEWS
January 4, 2016
Elizabeth Mosier is a writer in Wayne The sauceboat showed up in a bag of filthy artifacts dug up at the National Constitution Center site. To my untrained eye, it was just another dirty dish for a volunteer technician like me to wash, label, and catalog. But judging from the buzz in the archaeology lab the day the ceramics collector visited, this piece was important, even precious. The archaeologists believed they had unearthed a colonial-era treasure: an intact example of Bonnin and Morris soft-paste porcelain made by the American China Manufactory in the Southwark section of Philadelphia.
FOOD
April 17, 2015 | By Victoria Mier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everything in Laurel restaurant is chosen with precise care by chef and owner Nick Elmi. The wall sconces, of mottled brown iron and imperfect glass, were made by sous chef Eddie Konrad. Elmi built each piece of the rustic furniture and painted all the walls a creamy almond. One of the servers provides the fresh flowers that adorn each table. While the porcelain dinner plates weren't made by the staff, they were made especially for the Passyunk Avenue restaurant to Elmi's exacting specifications by a local ceramics studio, Felt+Fat . There's something about knowing the wares were made "just for us," Elmi said, turning a plate over and running his fingers across the Laurel engraved in the porcelain.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
  Once again the local auction community will join the post-Thanksgiving shopping rush, with at least two suburban sales scheduled the day after Black Friday. Both will offer objects suitable for gift-giving at more affordable prices than usual. Beginning at 9 a.m. Saturday at its annual Thanksgiving weekend auction at the Ludwig's Corner firehouse, Wiederseim Associates will offer more than 600 lots of antique and decorative furniture and accessories, notably maritime art, miniature portraits on ivory, gold coins, and silver.
FOOD
December 1, 2011
Stuff a stocking with one of these inspired teacups: the comfy mug, handmade bone china outfitted with a muffler knitted by the artist's mother, $22 for 6-ounce mug; or the double-walled Danish cup with the pattern of a Norwegian sweater, $34 per set of two; or a reindeer mug of white porcelain with silicone bands to protect fingers while sipping, $22. - Maureen Fitzgerald All available at Premium Steap, 111 S. 18th St., 215-568-2920....
FOOD
April 28, 2011
Named "the best lentils in the world," by cookbook author Patricia Wells, these green lentils from Le Puy en Velay, France, are so much tastier than the grocery store variety. If you have been trying to work a lentil soup or salad into your regular rotation, these lentils will convince you. Not only are they delicious, the dark green lentils with blue marbling are also quite beautiful. - Maureen Fitzgerald Green Lentils from Le Puy A.O.P., $10.95 for a 17.6-ounce package at In the Kitchen Cooking School, 10 Mechanic St., Haddonfield.
FOOD
November 19, 2009
Casseroles travel safely to Thanksgiving dinner in this two-quart covered dish. Fits neatly into a woven wood basket, and the pair would make a nice gift to leave with the host.   For the gravy This lovely porcelain gravy boat is bordered with a garland of oak leaves, acorns and pumpkins - perfect for the annual autumnal feast. It holds 11 ounces of gravy, and it's microwavable and dishwasher safe.  
LIVING
September 11, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Catalog sales scheduled tomorrow and Monday will offer the opportunity to bid on fine Asian art and relics of bygone days - such as a Western Union stock ticker. In both cases, the catalogs are most easily accessed online. The fine Asian art - more than 1,200 lots, most of it Chinese and generally costly, with a dozen or more pieces expected to bring five-figure prices - will be offered by Freeman's beginning at 10 a.m. Monday at the gallery at 1808 Chestnut St. The catalog can be viewed at www.freemansauction.
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