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NEWS
April 26, 1993
Let's see if we can make some sense out of this new version of Washington gridlock, the successful Republican filibuster that skunked President Clinton's economic stimulus plan, the one that would have meant about $70 million for Philadelphia. First, Arlen Specter, the Philadelphia senator who voted with the bad guys, claims to have acted out of principle. But enough humor. This is serious. What we have here is worthwhile projects, things that probably should be done even without considering their economic effect, going undone for naked political reasons.
NEWS
August 17, 1994
It's what we've come to expect from Congress, especially in the House, where scores of people have been driven mad because they haven't gotten to be chairmen of committees since Ike was a pup. This week's circus has featured many of the Honorables baying at the moon and making the hilarious claim that the president is "partisan," as they plan to oppose him should he declare that the sun rises in the East. After the administration had given the Republicans anything they might want in a crime bill - lots of death penalties, prisons enough to hold the next several generations of Americans and a promise to continue racially skewed executions - flecks of foam remained around their mouths.
FOOD
June 5, 2003 | By Annette Gooch FOR THE INQUIRER
Cantonese-style roast pork is a favorite specialty at Chinese take-outs. Easily identified by its reddish-brown glaze, the pork is tender and succulent. It's ideal as a main course, added to stir-fried rice or noodles, or used as a topping for scrambled eggs or omelettes. Thanks to a fragrant marinade made with simple Asian seasonings, and to slow roasting, home cooks can produce savory results that are a near match for Cantonese "barbecued" pork from Chinese restaurants. Cantonese Roast Pork Makes 4 to 6 servings 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 tablespoon minced ginger 2 tablespoons minced shallot or green onion 1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine or dry sherry (see note)
NEWS
November 13, 1996 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Down the road from Grandma Peng and the woman called Old Zhao are 2,500 reasons why Chinese farmers will have to work even harder in the future. Pigs. Zhu Huanxian, 45, has the biggest pig farm in Yangzhen. Before Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms, he worked for the village commune. He became a pig farmer in 1989 and borrowed money to buy his own business this year. His farm supplies pork to the village of Yangzhen, as well as to markets 18 miles away in Beijing. Like all Chinese, Zhu can measure his affluence by mouthfuls of pork.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Clemens Food Group, the Montgomery County pork producer that makes the hot dogs, sausage, pulled pork, and ribs sold at Phillies games, plans to build a $255.7 million pork processing plant in Michigan. The announcement by the Michigan Economic Development Corp. is a win for Pennsylvania, which will keep 2,200 employees at the Clemens headquarters in Hatfield, and for Michigan, which will gain 810 new jobs. Formerly known as Hatfield Quality Meats, Clemens is a sixth-generation family-owned business founded in 1895.
NEWS
December 12, 2004
How much pork would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck pork? Woodchucks like Punxsutawney Phil, that legendary meteorological marmot, usually don't eat meat. But that didn't stop Rep. John Peterson (R., Pa.) from lavishing $100,000 worth of federal pork on the groundhog's hometown in Peterson's district, to upgrade a weather museum. With a regularity straight out of the movie Groundhog Day, federal "earmarks" such as this one reappear each appropriations season.
FOOD
April 12, 1989 | The Inquirer staff
The National Pork Producers Council has asked retailers to lower retail pork prices and to increase price specials. Don Gingerich, the council's president, said last week that the organization had asked 20 major retailers to reconsider their pricing of pork. Pork is carrying about a 40 percent markup in the meat case, which he said was unfair considering the prices that producers are paid for their hogs. "We are not asking (retailers) to take a loss," but cooperation is needed to avoid damage to producers, Gingerich said.
NEWS
November 5, 2008
In a state full of bad ideas about how to distribute taxpayers' money, New Jersey's recently revealed "Norcross Grants" stand out. Trenton has had all kinds of creative names for pork distribution - "Property Tax Assistance and Community Development"; "Livable Communities. " There have been colorful nicknames, too. The infamous "Mac account" - conjuring images of a cash machine - referred to then-Treasurer John McCormac, whose department oversaw the fund. But the name "Norcross Grants" - which, for good reasons, was not used in public - tells a plainer and even uglier truth.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Their little piggies are going to market, but not before they helped their owners make at least a little bit of Farm Show history this week. Two students from the W.B. Saul High School of Agricultural Sciences at 7100 Henry Ave. in Philadelphia were honored for raising prize-winning pigs in separate market-hog categories. Robert Corradi, a senior, won a grand champion prize for his Yorkshire pig. Jonathan Monford, also a senior, won the reserve champion award for his pig in the Berkshire division.
FOOD
February 12, 2016
Like a lot of new restaurants, Tio Flores is still working out the kinks. Several of them, in fact. This fun and colorful Mexican-theme project at 16th and South Streets, from the owners of Hawthornes and the Cambridge, is especially prone to overusing its "Tio spice," an orange powder that gives everything from the tortilla chips to the taco-shell salad bowl the salty aspect of Dorito cuisine. As much as I dislike that choice, with no plain chips available, there is one great dish here I can't stop thinking about - the New Mexico pork chile, which isn't exactly presented like a traditional stew, either.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 16, 2016
Makes 4 servings For the tenderloin: 1/3 cup soy sauce (or lower-sodium soy sauce) 1/3 cup packed light brown sugar 2 tablespoons sesame oil 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 tablespoon dry mustard 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper 2 whole pork tenderloins (1 to 2 pounds total) For watermelon salad: 4 cups watermelon, cut into 1-inch cubes 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 teaspoons red wine vinegar 1/2 medium sweet onion, diced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint leaves Sea salt 1. To prepare the tenderloins, place all the marinade ingredients in a bowl, and whisk until the sugar is dissolved.
FOOD
May 13, 2016
Since a change in the kitchen early this year at SouthGate, new chef David Feola has been trying to coax the menu at this Korean-theme gastropub at 18th and Lombard a little farther away from the deep fryer. Wing fans shouldn't fret. The crackly crisp and meaty birds slicked in sweet and spicy sauces here aren't going anywhere. But there's definitely been a push toward some more interesting dishes from the longtime former Vernick sous-chef. A seared snapper over jalapeƱo-edamame puree is one example.
FOOD
April 1, 2016 | By Beth D'Addono, For The Inquirer
The humble sausage is truly inspired. Traditionally cobbled together from leftover bits of ground pork and spices and stuffed into a casing from equally modest beginnings, sausages are peasant fare and hearty feasting all in one. Sausage-making, with its use of all things tail to snout, appeals to the parsimonious as well as to the creative butcher intent on honoring the whole animal without waste. But sausage is made of much more than pork these days; butchers are stuffing casings with not only mainstream chicken and turkey, but also lamb, veal, and even salmon, in combinations that keep up with current flavor trends, things like Buffalo chicken and lamb tandoori mango.
FOOD
February 12, 2016
Like a lot of new restaurants, Tio Flores is still working out the kinks. Several of them, in fact. This fun and colorful Mexican-theme project at 16th and South Streets, from the owners of Hawthornes and the Cambridge, is especially prone to overusing its "Tio spice," an orange powder that gives everything from the tortilla chips to the taco-shell salad bowl the salty aspect of Dorito cuisine. As much as I dislike that choice, with no plain chips available, there is one great dish here I can't stop thinking about - the New Mexico pork chile, which isn't exactly presented like a traditional stew, either.
FOOD
February 5, 2016
Makes 4 servings For the Sausage: 1 pound ground pork 1/2 cup minced shallot 3 tablespoons minced garlic 3 tablespoons minced lemongrass 1 tablespoon sugar 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1/2 teaspoon black pepper Kosher salt Oil For the Nuoc Cham: 1/2 cup fish sauce 1/4 cup water 1/4 cup lime juice 2 tablespoons palm, raw, or light brown sugar 1 garlic clove, minced 1/2 teaspoon sambal...
FOOD
November 26, 2015
This is one recipe you'll be grateful to have on a busy weeknight: It's made in one skillet in less than a half-hour; it provides a use for those often-discarded broccoli stalks; and it brings pure pleasure to the table. Herb-Rubbed Pork Chops With Warm Broccoli Slaw 4 servings 1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage (may substitute 1 teaspoon dried sage) 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary (may substitute 1 teaspoon dried rosemary) 1/2 teaspoon granulated garlic (powder)
FOOD
September 11, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Aside from the obligatory picnic slaw, cabbage can seem like the vegetable of last resort, the go-to green when nothing else is in season. Yet throughout the summer, the humble brassica kept showing up on local restaurant menus, from a smoked rendition at Lo Spiedo to an 18-hour cabbage at Helm and in fermented, pickled, salady form at many places in between. "We associate cabbage with the fall, to be served with apples and pork and other meats, but, really, cabbage grows very well in summertime," says Brian Ricci.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Egg-glazed pastries, bright yellow egg tarts, and golden brown buns sit behind a glass window at Mong Kok Station, one of the many bakeries in Chinatown. There's a bakery at 109 N. 10th St. And, on the same block, two others plus Mong Kok at 153 N. 10th. That's four bakeries on one block, all offering almost the same thing: a cacophony of cream and carbohydrates. In the kitchen, dough is rising. And bun by bun, the bakers, some of them Chinese immigrants with little or no education and English language skills, are improving their lot in life.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Clemens Food Group, the Montgomery County pork producer that makes the hot dogs, sausage, pulled pork, and ribs sold at Phillies games, plans to build a $255.7 million pork processing plant in Michigan. The announcement by the Michigan Economic Development Corp. is a win for Pennsylvania, which will keep 2,200 employees at the Clemens headquarters in Hatfield, and for Michigan, which will gain 810 new jobs. Formerly known as Hatfield Quality Meats, Clemens is a sixth-generation family-owned business founded in 1895.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2014
ASK ANY Chinese kid what his or her favorite dish is, and the answer is very likely to be sweet and sour pork tenderloin, or tang cu li ji in Pinyin (phonetic Mandarin). The boneless meat, the rewarding sweetness and the enticing sourness - all are the things that children cannot resist. SWEET AND SOUR PORK TENDERLOIN 2 pounds pork tenderloin (about 6 pieces) Cornstarch Cooking oil Salt 1 tablespoon Chinese cooking wine 2 tablespoons vinegar 3 1/2 tablespoons sugar 4 tablespoons ketchup 4 scallions, chopped (green and white portions)
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