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NEWS
April 26, 1993
Let's see if we can make some sense out of this new version of Washington gridlock, the successful Republican filibuster that skunked President Clinton's economic stimulus plan, the one that would have meant about $70 million for Philadelphia. First, Arlen Specter, the Philadelphia senator who voted with the bad guys, claims to have acted out of principle. But enough humor. This is serious. What we have here is worthwhile projects, things that probably should be done even without considering their economic effect, going undone for naked political reasons.
NEWS
August 17, 1994
It's what we've come to expect from Congress, especially in the House, where scores of people have been driven mad because they haven't gotten to be chairmen of committees since Ike was a pup. This week's circus has featured many of the Honorables baying at the moon and making the hilarious claim that the president is "partisan," as they plan to oppose him should he declare that the sun rises in the East. After the administration had given the Republicans anything they might want in a crime bill - lots of death penalties, prisons enough to hold the next several generations of Americans and a promise to continue racially skewed executions - flecks of foam remained around their mouths.
FOOD
June 5, 2003 | By Annette Gooch FOR THE INQUIRER
Cantonese-style roast pork is a favorite specialty at Chinese take-outs. Easily identified by its reddish-brown glaze, the pork is tender and succulent. It's ideal as a main course, added to stir-fried rice or noodles, or used as a topping for scrambled eggs or omelettes. Thanks to a fragrant marinade made with simple Asian seasonings, and to slow roasting, home cooks can produce savory results that are a near match for Cantonese "barbecued" pork from Chinese restaurants. Cantonese Roast Pork Makes 4 to 6 servings 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 tablespoon minced ginger 2 tablespoons minced shallot or green onion 1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine or dry sherry (see note)
NEWS
November 13, 1996 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Down the road from Grandma Peng and the woman called Old Zhao are 2,500 reasons why Chinese farmers will have to work even harder in the future. Pigs. Zhu Huanxian, 45, has the biggest pig farm in Yangzhen. Before Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms, he worked for the village commune. He became a pig farmer in 1989 and borrowed money to buy his own business this year. His farm supplies pork to the village of Yangzhen, as well as to markets 18 miles away in Beijing. Like all Chinese, Zhu can measure his affluence by mouthfuls of pork.
NEWS
December 12, 2004
How much pork would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck pork? Woodchucks like Punxsutawney Phil, that legendary meteorological marmot, usually don't eat meat. But that didn't stop Rep. John Peterson (R., Pa.) from lavishing $100,000 worth of federal pork on the groundhog's hometown in Peterson's district, to upgrade a weather museum. With a regularity straight out of the movie Groundhog Day, federal "earmarks" such as this one reappear each appropriations season.
FOOD
April 12, 1989 | The Inquirer staff
The National Pork Producers Council has asked retailers to lower retail pork prices and to increase price specials. Don Gingerich, the council's president, said last week that the organization had asked 20 major retailers to reconsider their pricing of pork. Pork is carrying about a 40 percent markup in the meat case, which he said was unfair considering the prices that producers are paid for their hogs. "We are not asking (retailers) to take a loss," but cooperation is needed to avoid damage to producers, Gingerich said.
NEWS
November 5, 2008
In a state full of bad ideas about how to distribute taxpayers' money, New Jersey's recently revealed "Norcross Grants" stand out. Trenton has had all kinds of creative names for pork distribution - "Property Tax Assistance and Community Development"; "Livable Communities. " There have been colorful nicknames, too. The infamous "Mac account" - conjuring images of a cash machine - referred to then-Treasurer John McCormac, whose department oversaw the fund. But the name "Norcross Grants" - which, for good reasons, was not used in public - tells a plainer and even uglier truth.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Their little piggies are going to market, but not before they helped their owners make at least a little bit of Farm Show history this week. Two students from the W.B. Saul High School of Agricultural Sciences at 7100 Henry Ave. in Philadelphia were honored for raising prize-winning pigs in separate market-hog categories. Robert Corradi, a senior, won a grand champion prize for his Yorkshire pig. Jonathan Monford, also a senior, won the reserve champion award for his pig in the Berkshire division.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012
The chain: California Pizza Kitchen Location: 4040 City Ave. Order time: Leisurely. Price: $13. Company Description: "Slow-roasted pulled pork, red onions, cilantro pesto, Mozzarella and Queso Quesadilla cheese with SPICY habanero salsa. " Calories: 1,170, with 6 grams of fiber, 65 grams of protein, 18 grams of saturated fat, 2,210 mgs. of salt and 118 grams of carbs. Review: CPK has a variety of odd, interesting pizza choices, but the Gang decided to pig out on this new pulled-pork entry.
FOOD
October 18, 2012 | By Joyce Gemperlein, For The Inquirer
I'm pushing chorizo, the in-your-face paprika-laden sausage, to the top of my list of dearly beloved pork products. My only hesitation is a reluctance to betray bacon, for which I had a fervor decades before it was, like cupcakes and balsamic vinegar, marketed into a cliche. Let me note that, after a few minutes of horror, I, too, have rejected as hogwash recent propaganda from a pork advocacy group in England that the world will run short of pork - bacon was stressed in the stories to induce panic and hoarding - next year due to bad weather this year.
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NEWS
April 11, 2014
ANYONE well-versed in contemporary commerce will tell you that while credit is convenient, cash is king. Unless you're in South Philadelphia, where an ancient form of currency holds even loftier influence, and goes great with a little cheese. The painstaking art of hand-making soppressata - the heavily spiced, cured pork salami closely associated with southern Italy - is not lost, but it's not exactly easy to find. That's why anyone armed with a bucket of the stuff - "super-sod" past Snyder Avenue, "soupie" in coal-mining country, a thousand colloquial variations everywhere else - might as well be strutting down the street with a wallet fatter than a hog set to slaughter.
NEWS
December 23, 2013
The Delaware River Port Authority no doubt wishes we would just forget about that time it spent half a billion dollars on peripheral pork projects. But the commuters who have to cough up an Abraham Lincoln every time they cross the Ben Franklin - or trudge up a PATCO line stairway because the agency forgot to pay the escalator guy - endure frequent reminders of the 15-year squandering spree. Fortunately, federal authorities aren't letting it go, either. They served several subpoenas on DRPA officials last week, including at least three members of the board that runs the bistate bridge and rail agency.
NEWS
November 15, 2013
WHAT TO EAT: If smoky, barbecued pork and perfectly seasoned fries are your thing, Guerrilla Ultima has the menu for you. DINING DEETS: A recent Sunday brunch included Guerrilla Hashish ($12), layered yumminess of plancha (grilled) potatoes, tender smoked pork, aioli and - wait for it - an egg over easy. Trust us; the combination of flavors was delightful. We also consumed the equally tasty Ultima Guerrilla fries ($7), lightly seasoned with smoked paprika and garlic, and topped with homemade chili.
NEWS
November 8, 2013
Company description: Wok-seared pork, red and green bell peppers, red onions, cilantro, garlic, lemongrass, rice sticks and sweet pineapple "topped with a kick of our own sriracha sauce. " Chain: Pei Wei Asian Diner. Location: 4040 City Ave. (near Monument Road), Wynnefield Heights Nutrition information: 860 calories, with 50 grams of fat and 1,830 milligrams of sodium. Order time: 10 minutes. Price: $6.95. Review: I prepped my palate for the new Sriracha Pineapple Pork Lettuce Wraps by feasting the previous day on the Asian-chic chain's delicious Thai Chicken Lettuce Wraps.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
What you'll find: Their motto is "globally inspired gourmet comfort food. " Their menu is basically pork, pork and more pork, with the perk that it's hormone-free and organically pastured, from Leidy's, in Souderton. Come hungry: This is no place for dieters. And better get the stain-stick ready. Sandwiches come heaping, dripping and greasy - in the best possible way. The details: The Western is smoked pork, sharp cheddar cheese, thick-cut bacon and barbecue sauce ($9); Penguin's Pub is smoked pork, provolone, sautéed onions and jalapeño relish ($9)
FOOD
September 13, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
NORTH MADISONVILLE, Tenn. - There was a collective gasp in Bacon America in May when some hot coals left in kindling ignited a fire in the smokehouse of Benton's Smoky Mountain Country Hams, located an hour south of Knoxville. Chefs and the national press fretted. Concerned calls from across the country jammed proprietor Allan Benton's phone lines. One of his competitors and colleagues in country ham, Sam Edwards of Edwards & Sons in Surry, Va., finally just wrote him a letter, asking how he could help, even offering to smoke some of Benton's meat.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
A version of this review appeared in the Shore Dining Guide. Revel survived the hurricane but has been under water of a different sort - a bankruptcy it emerged from in May. Of course I knew Revel had issues last year when, during my review of the new casino's restaurants, I shook my head at the lack of an Asian noodle bar. Coincidence that a noodle bar, Yuboka, was one of the first new orders of business? I think not. It may surprise some that Jose Garces has been tapped to run it. But he does have some Asian experience with Chifa, and the sectioned-off platform of raised counter seats, set between the gambling floor and Amada, is already a bustling hub of noodle-slurping and steamer-basket feasts.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
A/K/A: El Rodeo Mobile Food Catering Truck. What to eat: You can't miss with anything here. Produce arrives fresh daily. Meats are slightly charred and shaved right off the spit (or bone). Side sauces - delivered in tiny, capped cups - are tangy and surprising. Main ingredients include the standard chicken, beef and pork. But you might find chorizo, tripe, cabeza or whatever else chef/owner Juan Gasca has available in the off-site commissary where he prepares the fillings that are interestingly combined in burritos, quesadillas, fajitas, enchiladas and zincronizadas.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
Seven years after Goldman Sachs bought a hunk of China's Shuanghui International Holdings, the meat-processing giant has returned the favor by offering to acquire America's largest pork producer, Smithfield Foods. If the deal survives the scrutiny of Smithfield's shareholders and the U.S. Treasury Department, the $4.72 billion deal would be the largest takeover of a U.S. company by a Chinese firm. In today's globalized economy, capital knows no borders. Here in capitalism central, however, this mutually agreed-upon merger is raising hackles.
FOOD
June 7, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
I pulled into the muddy lot between the train tracks and the old sandwich shack, and John Bucci Jr. was waiting. It was after hours at John's Roast Pork in South Philadelphia, but his clean white apron was pulled taut around his waist. And as the garlicky smell of roasting picnic hams rubbed in rosemary wafted from the luncheonette to greet me, Bucci pumped his fists skyward and broke into a victory dance. "You're back!" he said. But the shocker here was that John Bucci Jr. was back - and glowing healthy against tall odds.
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