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BUSINESS
June 14, 1996 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
How many people can pig out on a roast pork sandwich after seeing the movie "Babe"? If you've seen "Babe," you know the plot revolves around an adorable little piglet's efforts to avoid being served with gravy. Yet, Greater Media Cable subscribers who order "Babe" on pay-per-view this month can get a free sandwich and soda from John's Roast Pork restaurant, across from Snyder Plaza, just by showing their cable bill. "I know some people say, 'How could you?,' " said Greater Media Cable pay-per-view manager Vinny Verrico.
NEWS
May 25, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
John Bucci Jr. was doing his best to make the last hours count at his family's South Philadelphia luncheonette, John's Roast Pork - preparing it for several months without him. On Monday, he taught his 20-year-old niece, Bethany Messick (known as "Boo"), the secret recipe for the family's legendary Italian roast pork. John's has become the city's premier destination for cheesesteaks in recent years, but he reminded her: That garlicky fourth-generation pork is still its best sandwich.
NEWS
August 12, 1997 | By Colleen O'Connor
Before adjourning for its August recess, the Senate overwhelmingly passed a $247 billion defense appropriation bill - an increase of about $3.1 billion over this year's spending and the Defense Department's own request. Much of that increase will go to purchase new weapons, including some the Pentagon didn't ask for: an additional billion-dollar Aegis destroyer, $625 million for an additional attack submarine. Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.), whose conservative credentials and distinguished military record are unassailable, identified $5.6 billion of pork designed to keep defense contractors and their employees happy.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | By James J. Kilpatrick
Just before Congress adjourned for its August recess, Sen. Rudy Boschwitz (R., Minn.) performed a remarkably useful service. He exposed billions of dollars in what are known as "add-ons and plus-ups" to the defense appropriations bill. He was talking, of course, about political pork. Before he had concluded his abortive effort, his indignant colleagues were squealing like stuck pigs. Boschwitz is one of the ablest - and quietest - members of the Senate in which he has served for the past 10 years.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | By Elsa C. Arnett, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A booming economy, election-year politics and a touted budget surplus are setting the stage for fresh explosions of wasteful pork-barrel spending, concerned politicians and interest-group leaders fretted yesterday. Already, some members of Congress have grabbed $9 billion for still-secret highway and bridge projects agreed upon during negotiations with House Transportation Committee Chairman Bud Shuster (R., Pa.), who is shepherding through Congress a $181.9 billion bill to reauthorize highway programs.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1994 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Call it the merger of the happy pig and the Phillies frank. Hatfield Quality Meats Inc., of Hatfield, a major area producer of pork products that uses the smiling porker as its logo, yesterday announced that it had agreed to acquire Medford Inc., the Chester company that produces Phillies-brand hot dogs and deli products. Both companies are family-owned. Terms of the transaction were not announced. The acquisition represents an effort by Hatfield to enter the deli-meat market and Medford's desire to be a part of the trend toward consolidation in the meat industry, according to E.T. Briddell, president of Phoenix Management Services, Medford's financial adviser.
FOOD
February 10, 2005 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Love is juicy, pungent, redolent. It's like garlic. It lingers, makes a mess, leaves a mark. You know what love is not? A box of chocolates. The concept of romance, especially around Valentine's Day, as something sweet, fussy, pristine, expensive and, inevitably, French, is so pervasive and tired as to be sitcom trite. Beyond that, it's just wrong - romance as an artificial, aspirational state detached from passion and longing, as if engineered by a Harlequin hack, not a seasoned adult.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | By Sonya Senkowsky, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Some say politics and pork go hand in hand. In Paulsboro, they do. For at least 15 years, the St. John's Catholic School Parents and Teachers Association has held an Election Day sale of porkettes - a local variety of hot roast pork sandwiches - to help raise money for the school. The sale, held in the same auditorium that serves as a borough polling place, brings together residents who want to chew over politics while they chew up pork. The meal is purely Paulsboro. Although pork roasts called porchettas are an Italian staple easily found in South Philadelphia, the porkette sandwiches aren't easily found too far out of town.
NEWS
March 3, 1997 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A brawl is shaping up in Congress over a highway bill that will affect the safety of the nation's roads, the efficiency of the transportation system, and the future of mass transit and Amtrak. The $150 billion bill, dubbed "Ice Tea" for the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA), has attracted armies of lobbyists, from highway builders and truckers to safety advocates and environmentalists. But its special allure for members of Congress is the massive amounts of pork it will provide for them to distribute to their job-hungry and traffic-weary constituents.
NEWS
September 6, 2005 | By Tony Gnoffo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like communities all along the Gulf Coast, the West Beach neighborhood of this seaport town has block after block of leveled homes and businesses, and plenty of flood and wind damage to those that survived. But unlike those other communities, this one also has untold pounds of rotting chickens and pork products strewn about like coconuts on a tropical beach, plus an assortment of other less offensive items, all swept from the nearby Mississippi State Port. It stinks to high heaven, and may present a health risk.
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