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NEWS
September 4, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Where's the beef? That's what U.S. Department of Agriculture inspectors wondered in 1987, when they began taking a closer look at "all-beef" meat products made by C.D. Moyer Co. at its plant in Silverdale, Bucks County. Turns out the company, a subsidiary since 1984 of the Philadelphia-based lunch-meat maker, Freda Corp., was using non-beef ingredients in certain products to cut costs and fatten profits, federal prosecutors say. The inspectors had a legitimate beef. Moyer and the vice president in charge of the plant, Matthew A. Guiffrida, 56, were charged yesterday with mail fraud and sale of adulterated meat.
FOOD
February 24, 2005 | By Mary Engelbreit FOR THE INQUIRER
For an unforgettable dinner, consider this sublime roast pork. Modern culinary technology can't beat slow, oven-roasted pork gently flavored with sage and garlic. At the table, the roast awaits the carving ceremony, a nice touch at a sit-down event. With the exception of boneless tenderloins (their cooking time is critical), oven-roasted meats are entertaining stand-bys. Slip them into the oven at your convenience. If carving is something you'd rather do without an audience, slice and plate the roast in the kitchen.
NEWS
June 30, 2006
Haven't earned trust So, the point of your editorial on the New York Times leak of classified information ("Prosecuting Journalists: Democracy feels a chill," June 28) is that the press has the right to decide what deserves to be kept from our enemies and what the press should be entitled to know? That we should trust the press, but not trust our government? Sorry, you have not earned that trust. Terrence V. Gallagher West Chester Press doing its job The attacks on the New York Times for publishing an article about international financial transactions are particularly grotesque because the information that the government has been monitoring transactions has been in the public domain for several years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1998 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
It won't come as much of a surprise to most that the area around Washington Avenue has been witness to an increasing number of Vietnamese restaurants and food markets. What might raise some eyebrows is a food item called banh mi thit nguoi that I came across at the Viet Huong Cafe, 16th Street and Washington Avenue. This translates roughly to "Vietnamese hoagie. " "Well, not exactly," one of the owners explained. "It's actually a French hoagie. " Hmmmm. And we thought the hoagie was a Philadelphia creation.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
For the last several summers, Bridget Gray's job could be described as culinary curator. As part of the staff behind the food-focused fund-raiser known as Feastival, she is charged with overseeing the menu items that nearly 90 restaurants and bars will serve Wednesday. She has to keep the selections diverse, to satisfy the 700 or so patrons who are paying upward of $250 a head for the night of entertainment and cocktail-party-style nibbling at Pier 9 on the Delaware River. This third Feastival - whose participants are wrangled by restaurateurs Stephen Starr, Michael Solomonov, and Audrey Claire Taichman - is expected to raise $400,000 for the Live Arts Festival and Philly Fringe.
NEWS
December 13, 2003
Math is a really, really difficult subject to master. And some students in Washington desperately need tutors. The students include Tommy DeLay, Denny Hastert and Billy Frist. They belong to an after-school club called "conservative Republicans" and have promised to be real careful in mathematics and save the country a lot of money. Like, billions and billions. Their teacher is Mr. Bush, who got alternative certification for this classroom position. He pretends to be stern, but he's really a softie.
NEWS
November 15, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For sheer friendliness, Chao Restaurant in Paoli is hard to beat. This spanking-clean little Chinese restaurant is bathed in bright fluorescent lights that dazzle almost as much as the smiles of the two sisters who own it. The owners and chef formerly ran the China Delight restaurant in nearby Devon (now run by a friend), but moved to the attractive Chestnut Village Shoppes in 1990. Like the decor, the cuisine is moderately pleasant, although dishes could benefit from more assertive seasonings.
NEWS
September 27, 1987 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four Seasons, one of the many new Chinese restaurants that have sprung up in recent months, is not as fancy as some of its competitors, but its food is quietly appealing. Generous portions filled with a good variety of ingredients are mercifully prepared without MSG. Although no one dish stands out, the Cherry Hill restaurant is a safe bet for satisfying dining. The best dish sampled on a recent visit was House Special Soup ($5.85), a large bowl of full-bodied, homemade chicken broth crammed with half the kitchen larder - tender chicken, whole peeled shrimp, giant medallions of red- roasted pork, carrots with serrated edges, crisp snow pea pods, delicate bamboo shoots, crunchy water chestnuts, firm bok choy, Chinese cabbage, canned mushrooms (alas!
FOOD
May 6, 1992 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Pineapple adds natural sweetness and savor to spicy foods; its unique flavor is especially welcome in dishes from the cuisines where the pineapple grows. Pineapple adds something else to meat and poultry: tenderness! Fresh raw pineapple - and pineapple juice - contain an enzyme that helps break down the fibers of meat that might otherwise be tough: ultra lean beef, for example. This enzyme survives only so long as the pineapple is not cooked, canned or heat-treated, so pay special attention to making sure you use the ingredient called for in these recipes . . . don't substitute canned!
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Chinese restaurants with takeout menus save the day when a busy family can't face another pizza, or when vacationers come home to an empty fridge. A recent post-vacation stop at Lucky Star, a year-old Chinese restaurant in an Andorra shopping center, yielded a hasty, generous and cheap dinner for two. A spring roll, a pint of soup, a cold noodle dish, two entrees, rice and two fortune cookies cost $22.59. Lucky Star will not dazzle you. It does offer a warm welcome, waits of less than 10 minutes for takeout, familiar dishes and low prices.
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