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BUSINESS
November 30, 1994 | BOB LARAMIE/ DAILY NEWS
Delaware Avenue ports were abuzz yesterday as USDA Inspector Jonnie Tigner (above) examines first shipment of Chilean fruit of the season, a $1.5 billion industry, at Tioga Fruit Terminal. Bill Molz (left) checks inventory at new 208,000-square-foot warehouse for forest products at Snyder Avenue.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1986 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
City officials are hoping their plan to create an enterprise zone along the Delaware River waterfront will help capture state subsidies needed to rebuild Philadelphia's port facilities. The city Commerce Department wants to nominate a large stretch of riverfront property for consideration as an enterprise zone - a designation that would allow the area to better compete for low-interest loans and grants. The area that the city has in mind includes the Tioga and Packer Avenue marine terminals, and all the waterfront property in between.
NEWS
May 14, 2010
Dole Fresh Fruit Co. has renewed its lease until 2025 with the Diamond State Port Corp. at the Port of Wilmington, Delaware Gov. Jack Markell announced Friday. The long-term contract "secures more than 800 jobs at the port," he said. Financial terms were not disclosed. Wilmington is the largest banana-receiving port in the world. In 2009, Dole made 57 ship calls in Wilmington. Dole is the largest banana company in North America and brings in more than 60 million individual bananas and over 1 million individual pineapples a week into Wilmington, said Stuart Jablon, Dole's vice president of operations in Wilmington.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Port of Philadelphia will gain a shipping line when Horizon Lines Inc. moves its northeast terminal operations from Elizabeth, N.J., in April. The Charlotte, N.C.-based shipping company said Wednesday that the Philadelphia port would handle cargo arriving from its operations in Puerto Rico. Richard Rodriguez, general manager of Horizon's Puerto Rican operations, said in a statement that the company expected the relocation to produce "significant advantages," including faster transit and turnaround times, and expedited cargo inspections.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Next time you peel a banana, there's an excellent chance it will have slipped here through a port on the Delaware River. Billions of bananas arrive through the piers and terminals on the Delaware headed to grocers, wholesalers, and produce markets across the country. Wilmington is the largest banana port in North America, and is second only to Antwerp, Belgium, in banana cargoes in the world. Dole Fresh Fruit Co. brings one ship a week, carrying more than 65 million bananas into the Christina River in Wilmington, or more than three billion bananas a year, said Dole vice president for operations Stuart Jablon.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1986 | By BOB EISBERG, Daily News Staff Writer
While the maritime community has been lobbying hard for Conrail to develop an intermodal yard near the port, CSX has been working quietly on such a facility in South Philadelphia. Within the next two months, the parent company of the Chessie system will complete a $2.3 million renovation of its 60-acre yard at Snyder and Delaware avenues that will boost its capacity to transfer marine cargo containers to rail flatcars. "It's a great step forward for the port," said Bill DeWitt, the Philadelphia Port Corp.
NEWS
June 28, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frances H. Sherman, 65, who was one of the first women to become a business leader at the Ports of Philadelphia and became something of an institution in Delaware River business circles, died Sunday in the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Ms. Sherman had worked for 43 years at Davies, Turner & Co., a customs brokerage and foreign freight forwarding firm, where she was secretary- treasurer and managed the Philadelphia office for more than half of her career. Ms. Sherman became known within the port for her knowledge of customs regulations.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cargoes were up 10.4 percent in 2012 in the Port of Philadelphia, the third consecutive year for gains and an indicator the economy is improving, officials said. More steel, more paper, more cars. And sugar, a new cargo, weighed in at 24,331 tons. But the year was not all rosy. Container shipments were down after Chilean shipping company CSAV reduced ship calls at Tioga Marine Terminal and Star Line L.L.C. suspended service, citing the economy and rising fuel costs. Since a recession slowed shipping worldwide in 2009, ports on the Delaware River have seen an uptick in business - cargo volume in Philadelphia was up 17 percent in 2010 and 10 percent in 2011.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1995 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stung by a state ethics commission conflict-of-interest ruling, John Ober resigned yesterday as vice chairman of the South Jersey Port Corp. Ober came under scrutiny by New Jersey's Executive Commission on Ethical Standards because of private business dealings with the state-owned port agency's municipal dock at Salem. He is one of three partners in the Del Line, a one-year-old steamship company that uses the Port of Salem dock. Though it acknowledged that Ober quit voting on Salem matters when Del Line began using Salem last July, the commission ruled that he had continued to participate in discussions and receive confidential information related to Salem.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ERIC MENCHER
Port of call: Penn's Landing, where the SS Meridian stopped yesterday. Non- cruisers also got some sun.
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NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vice President Biden toured a dredging barge at Penn's Landing on Thursday to show support for the project to deepen the Delaware River shipping channel. Biden, the latest high-profile politician to visit the region in recent days, was flanked by a phalanx of Pennsylvania Democrats - U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr., and U.S. Reps. Robert A. Brady and Chaka Fattah. Before delivering remarks on the ongoing deepening of the Delaware, Biden and the delegation were taken on a tour of the large barge by Brian Puckett, project manager for Great Lakes Dredging & Dock Co. The vessel's main feature, a dredging bucket that can haul as much as two dump trucks, immediately caught Biden's eye. "That's a hell of a bucket," the vice president said after walking a gangplank onto the ship.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority will seek "expressions of interest" to develop the 200 acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. The board agreed at its monthly meeting Tuesday to accept proposals - called "request for expressions of interest" - from terminal operators, steamship lines, automobile manufacturers, energy companies, and investment firms with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's the stuff of reality television: a Battle of the Port Titans. Two prominent marine-terminal operators with big stakes in the Delaware River each want to manage and control some of the 200 acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge. Vying for the millions of dollars in business opportunities that could result: John Brown Jr., president of Penn Warehousing and Distribution Inc., a paper-import company that operates from Piers 38 and 40 and 78 and 80, who also runs Murphy Marine Services at the Port of Wilmington; and the Holt family, whose companies operate the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal and Gloucester Terminals L.L.C.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Was it sabotage? A federal judge didn't think so. He called it a case of the "broker wars" at the Port of Philadelphia. Ozburn-Hessey Logistics, one of the world's largest third-party logistics companies, sued when 10 employees left to start a rival U.S. Customs brokerage in Philadelphia. Customs brokers help importers clear perishable produce through customs inspections at U.S. ports before it is delivered to grocery stores. Philadelphia is a major perishables port, and about 150 companies ship fresh produce through here, noted U.S. District Judge L. Felipe Restrepo.
NEWS
July 6, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Paulsboro's northern tip, near a modest baseball and football field, a huge swath of open land along the Delaware River sits prepped and primed for reuse after years of being a desolate home to a former oil terminal and chemical plant. "They took down the tanks and they started, and then they stopped," Nirah Wilson, 80, said last week outside his Second Street ranch house, neighboring the site. "They're standing still," said Wilson, a retired Air Force aircraft mechanic. "That's what it looks like.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police are searching for a man who attacked a 65-year-old nun Sunday morning in Port Richmond, then dragged her from a car and drove away with it. The nun, whose name was not released, was wearing her habit and was waiting in the passenger seat of a friend's car outside a Shop Rite store on Aramingo Avenue about 11:15 a.m., police said. The friend was inside and had left the engine on. The man opened the driver's-side door and said, "Tell me wherever you want to go," authorities said.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The U.S. Attorney's Office has asked the New Jersey legislative committee investigating September lane closures at the George Washington Bridge to postpone its plans to take testimony from the executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, a committee spokesman confirmed Thursday. Patrick Foye was scheduled to testify before the committee on Tuesday, along with Port Authority Commissioner William "Pat" Schuber. Federal prosecutors are investigating the lane closures, which tied up traffic for four days in September and were allegedly orchestrated by former allies of Gov. Christie.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writer stansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
FOR THE SECOND year in a row, the Port Richmond Memorial Day Parade has been canceled due to a lack of funding and volunteers, according to a parade volunteer. "Everyone wants to watch the parade but no one understands how much work it takes," said Patty-Pat Kozlowski, former president and current executive director of Port Richmond on Patrol and Civic Association (PROPAC). The organization has helped put on the parade in prior years. Kozlowski said she hopes the 50-year-old hallmark will return next year.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A truck driver, arriving at a lot in South Philadelphia early Thursday to pick up a load of new Hyundai and Kia cars headed for dealer showrooms, spotted tiny red insects - dozens of them - swarming on car tires. He asked around, and nobody knew what they were, so he telephoned the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Harrisburg. "They got ahold of somebody, who got ahold of somebody," the driver said. Before long, inspectors from Customs and Border Protection "came out in white suits, took some bugs, and left.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - As multiple investigations continue into lane closures at the George Washington Bridge, Gov. Christie named a former state attorney general Tuesday as the new chairman of the authority that runs the bridge. The governor nominated John Degnan - who most recently worked as a senior executive at Chubb Corp., an insurance company based in Warren County - to lead the troubled bistate agency that controls bridges and tunnels connecting New Jersey and New York, as well as airports and the World Trade Center.
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