CollectionsPort Richmond
IN THE NEWS

Port Richmond

NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tractor-trailers are a too-frequent sight on Richmond Street, business owner Tom LaCroix said. "For years, Richmond Street has been unbearable, impassable at times," said LaCroix, owner of an Allstate Insurance office in the neighborhood. A Delaware Avenue extension, for a sixth of a mile, that will give trucks an alternative route of travel between Bridesburg and Port Richmond opened to traffic Tuesday morning. The $14.5 million extension, funded with federal dollars, passes though an industrialized area on land once used for parking between Orthodox and Lewis Streets and over Frankford Creek.
NEWS
December 4, 2015
"ON MY tombstone it will say 'Nothing is simple,' " says Linda Lukiewski, an indefatigable nun on a mission from God. Yesterday was not a simple day. A member of the order of Sisters of St. Joseph, Sister Linda, 64, has been the mainspring at St. Joan of Arc in Harrowgate, downgraded in 2013 by the Archdiocese from a parish to what's called a "worship site. " The "worship site" - a rectory, convent and picturesque chapel - was marred by a century-old, no-longer-working cast iron incinerator that gave Sister Linda the chills.
NEWS
November 12, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
MANVEER SINGH'S faith helped save a life Wednesday. Literally. The wiry gas-station clerk used his silver Sikh bangle - and considerable gall - to scare off a carjacking suspect who had allegedly kidnapped a doctor in Center City and had dragged her all the way to the Exxon where he works in Port Richmond. "I wasn't worried about my safety," Singh, 25, said Wednesday night as he demonstrated how he had held the bracelet, called a  kara , in his fist hours earlier. It's a thin metal band that symbolizes a Sikh's unbreakable attachment to God. "I was worried about my customers; they are all my brothers and sisters.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
BOODA, the female dachshund mix, and Bud, the male Lab mix, chased each other around Port Richmond's new and only dog park yesterday, mock-growling, attacking each other's floppy ears, kicking up the mulch, stopping only to nibble a piece of the shredded bark and catch their breath. Booda and Bud arrived as strangers at Monk's Dog Run, on Allegheny Avenue near Bath Street, and left as friends, pink tongues hanging over open jaws, tan tails wagging, eyeing each other with pure canine joy. Matt Pizzola, who owns Booda, 3, told Megan Polkus, who owns Bud, 6 months, that he led the drive to create Monk's Dog Run so pooches like theirs could play for hours, safe from the dangers of an urban park.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spacious apartments featuring full kitchens and bathrooms now occupy the hallways and classrooms that used to fill the Nativity B.V.M. School in Port Richmond. Later this month, seniors will move into the four-story brick building at 3255 Belgrade St. that opened in 1916 and shut its doors as a school in 2008. It will have a new name, Nativity B.V.M. Place, and a new mission, to provide low-income seniors with apartments of their own. A partnership of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, the city, and the federal government came together to remake this corner of Port Richmond.
NEWS
October 15, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A recent government study that found elevated blood levels of toxic lead in children living near a former lead factory in Port Richmond is renewing concerns about environmental contamination and how to address it. The study, led by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, collected soil, tap water, indoor dust, and child blood samples from homes around the former Anzon Inc. plant...
REAL_ESTATE
October 5, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A development of 36 townhouses for low-income residents being built on a vacant lot in Port Richmond is another sign that the neighborhood where people still order "square cheese" and fish pickles out of a barrel is changing. The development, Grace Townhomes, is being built on the site of a former carpet factory that has been vacant for more than 20 years. It's a joint venture of the Women's Community Revitalization Project and Firm Hope Baptist Church. The property is bounded by Auburn, William, and Janney Streets and Trenton Avenue.
NEWS
September 14, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Port Richmond man is in police custody after he barricaded himself in a bedroom in his family's home while under the influence of drugs, police said. The man, 39, had a "bad reaction" to drugs Monday morning, said Chief Inspector Joe Sullivan of the department's homeland security unit. Medics responded to the house on the 3000 block of Agate Street to take him to a hospital for a mental health evaluation at the request of his family, Sullivan said. The man refused to cooperate with the paramedics, who then called police, Sullivan said.
NEWS
September 3, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
On East Somerset Street, in a clean and roomy paddock next to a tire shop, in the shade of a giant weeping willow, lives a fat and contented pony - the Pony of Port Richmond. His name is Albert, but everyone calls him Coco. Coco does not bite or kick. He is patient and gentle with the neighborhood children and the many passersby who stop to gawk, who abide by the sign on the tire shop's gate: "Please, do not feed the animal (Horse). Thank You. " He does not flinch even when the cargo trains rumble past, or when the red rooster whose coop abuts his paddock crows.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
He wanted to practice Spanish. She wanted to hone her English. So, using a Skype profile feature that allowed them to text and talk, they got acquainted in two languages. Matt was a senior at Albright College in Reading, a Spanish major with a yen for public service; he'd spent part of junior year tutoring first graders in Nicaragua. Marlene was finishing college in Bolivia and hoped English fluency would boost her chances of landing a job as an environmental engineer. "Neither of us was looking for anything romantic," Marlene recalls.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|