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Port Security

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NEWS
July 20, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWARK, N.J. - Funding for port security and the Coast Guard would increase under a homeland security bill put forth by U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg. The New Jersey Democrat and new chairman of the Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee announced the bill's funding levels at Port Newark on Tuesday. The bill increases funding for overall port security by $50 million, to $350 million. New Jersey received about $50 million for port security last year. The bill also avoids the threatened elimination of five Coast Guard quick-response security teams, including one that is assigned to the New York-New Jersey ports region.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2003 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a quick stop in Wilmington yesterday, Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge launched new maritime security guidelines, but he left open a key, contentious issue: Who's going to pay to improve port security? "We still have to conclude who's to pay for what share of what," Ridge said, addressing an audience of local maritime officials on a dock at the Port of Wilmington. But Ridge indicated that his department needed to "look more aggressively" at businesses that use ports - from terminal operators to vessel owners to waterside facilities such as refineries and power plants.
NEWS
May 9, 2003 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While the nation's airports have received billions to upgrade security, the country's 361 seaports have far less federal funding for antiterrorism measures, local port officials said at a hearing in Philadelphia before the Pennsylvania House Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee. "Seaport security was neither a national or local priority before 9/11," said Herb Packer, director of PennPORTS, a government liaison office for the state's three main ports: Philadelphia, Erie and Pittsburgh.
NEWS
May 13, 2003 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rep. Robert Andrews urged the federal government yesterday to give the South Jersey Port Corp. $1.8 million to implement a new security plan aimed at thwarting possible terror attacks on its docks. The port corporation has submitted an "excellent" application for the funding after an $80,000 study found that security was weak at its facilities in Camden, the Democratic congressman said. The money would be used to pay for more security personnel and to purchase equipment to detect radiological, biological or chemical materials that could be used as weapons, Andrews said.
NEWS
June 19, 2003 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last week, after the U.S. Department of Homeland Security awarded long-awaited and highly competitive grants for port security projects, many in the maritime trade were baffled by the windfall for Citgo Petroleum Corp. The odds of anyone's getting a grant were no better than one in five. Even then, most of the winners were awarded less than $1 million. But Citgo, the profitable U.S. subsidiary of the Venezuelan national oil company, hit the jackpot: a $13.5 million grant to upgrade security at its refinery in Lake Charles, La. That's more than the combined 24 grants for the Delaware River port system.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
If there is a boating accident, oil spill, or potential terrorist threat, a 14-mile stretch of the Delaware River just south of Philadelphia now has heightened surveillance. A sophisticated system of cameras, radar, and video monitors designed by Boeing Co. has been set up at three undisclosed locations between the Commodore Barry Bridge, Marcus Hook, and Hog Island in Tinicum, aimed at providing increased riverfront security and the capacity to prevent, or react to, adverse events.
NEWS
February 23, 2006 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Port security has gone from a backwater concern to a big issue since the Sept. 11 attacks. But now, experts say, the dispute over the Bush administration's approval of a Persian Gulf-based firm to run operations at six U.S. ports is diverting attention from real port-security issues. Officials who run America's ports say the ports are much safer than they used to be. But they also say they are not getting enough money to keep them safe, and contend that the federal government is dragging its heels on a much-needed background check and identification-card program for six million transportation workers.
NEWS
February 24, 2006
EACH DAY the level of outrage increases over the Bush administration's deal with an Arab -controlled company to take over the management of ports in six cities, including Philadelphia. Senators and congressmen from both sides of the aisle are fighting to see who can loudest denounce the deal as a betrayal of American security. In response to their outcry, the Bush adminsitration announced last night that it was delaying the deal. And even some of Bush's staunchest conservative allies in the airwaves and blogosphere are questioning their leader, especially now that he has promised a veto if Congress attempts to kill the deal with Dubai Ports World, a company which is essentially controlled by a member government of the United Arab Emirates.
NEWS
February 16, 2013 | By Carol D. Leonnig and Peter Wallsten, Washington Post
A team of FBI agents has been conducting interviews in recent weeks in the Dominican Republic and the United States, looking into allegations that Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) patronized prostitutes in the Caribbean nation, but has found no evidence to support the claim, according to two people familiar with the investigation. One person said agents have asked about whether a Florida eye doctor - a close friend and major campaign donor to Menendez - provided the senator with prostitutes on vacations there.
NEWS
May 25, 2003 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon brings a unique take on port security: He's the only one in Congress who has witnessed a tanker catastrophe on the Delaware River. Weldon, 56, was a young teacher and volunteer firefighter in 1975, when the oil tanker Corinthos exploded at a Marcus Hook refinery pier after being rammed by a chemical tanker. The collision, which killed 29 seamen, set the Corinthos ablaze for three days and shut down the river, was an accident, not terrorism. But for Weldon, one of the first firefighters on the scene, the memory of that tragedy is a constant reminder of the potential dangers in an oil port like Philadelphia.
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NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Carol D. Leonnig and Peter Wallsten, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - A federal grand jury in Miami is investigating Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.), examining his role in advocating for the business interests of a wealthy donor and friend, according to three people aware of the probe. Menendez has intervened in matters affecting the financial interests of Florida ophthalmologist Salomon Melgen, seeking to apply pressure on the Dominican government to honor a contract with Melgen's port security company, documents and interviews show. Also, Menendez's office has acknowledged he interceded with federal health-care officials after they said that Melgen had overbilled the U.S. government for care at his clinic.
NEWS
February 16, 2013 | By Carol D. Leonnig and Peter Wallsten, Washington Post
A team of FBI agents has been conducting interviews in recent weeks in the Dominican Republic and the United States, looking into allegations that Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) patronized prostitutes in the Caribbean nation, but has found no evidence to support the claim, according to two people familiar with the investigation. One person said agents have asked about whether a Florida eye doctor - a close friend and major campaign donor to Menendez - provided the senator with prostitutes on vacations there.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
Sen. Bob Menendez is embroiled in a prostitution scandal - and it has little if anything to do with sex. The New Jersey Democrat has for three months been the target of voluminous allegations, all unconfirmed, that he hired prostitutes, one reportedly underage, in the Dominican Republic and other places. Menendez, the new chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has angrily denied the allegations as they bubbled up into the mainstream media. But, proving that the political gods do have a sense of humor, the Senate chose this exact moment - as Menendez fights for his political life - to take up two pieces of legislation on human trafficking, including one on child sex trafficking.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
If there is a boating accident, oil spill, or potential terrorist threat, a 14-mile stretch of the Delaware River just south of Philadelphia now has heightened surveillance. A sophisticated system of cameras, radar, and video monitors designed by Boeing Co. has been set up at three undisclosed locations between the Commodore Barry Bridge, Marcus Hook, and Hog Island in Tinicum, aimed at providing increased riverfront security and the capacity to prevent, or react to, adverse events.
NEWS
May 20, 2011
Funding cut perils jobs A loss of $16.5 million in state and federal funding for housing services means that the city will have to eliminate some jobs and reduce services next fiscal year, Mayor Nutter's spokesman said yesterday. Mark McDonald said the cuts - about $11.5 million in federal Community Development Block Grant money and the rest in state funding - are expected to take effect July 1 and will lead to the elimination of 21 vacant positions in a number of departments and agencies, as well as some layoffs.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2011 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Security screening at airports will still be a hassle and raise the cost of travel. Laws that turned banks into financial cops will stay in place. And most companies will still spend more to ship goods and secure their computer systems. No matter what happens next, Osama bin Laden's legacy has meant costs and fees that business and consumers had never faced before and that are not about to go away. Here is a look at how different industries and sectors were reshaped by the attacks: Airlines: Air travel changed from a routine exercise into a process of seemingly ever-changing rules and procedures and time-hogging scrutiny.
NEWS
July 20, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWARK, N.J. - Funding for port security and the Coast Guard would increase under a homeland security bill put forth by U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg. The New Jersey Democrat and new chairman of the Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee announced the bill's funding levels at Port Newark on Tuesday. The bill increases funding for overall port security by $50 million, to $350 million. New Jersey received about $50 million for port security last year. The bill also avoids the threatened elimination of five Coast Guard quick-response security teams, including one that is assigned to the New York-New Jersey ports region.
NEWS
October 15, 2006
The Case for Menendez U.S. senator Democrat, age 52 Hoboken New Jersey voters are being subjected to another election tainted with nasty debates and negative ads. It's a shame; these candidates are better than that. Both have the knowledge and passion to guide the nation on the important issues being lost in the melee. Bob Menendez has the superior experience, intellect and grasp of issues to serve New Jersey as U.S. senator. In the short time since his appointment to the Senate in January, he's capitalized on leadership skills gained in a 14-year congressional career to pass meaningful legislation, despite being in the minority party.
NEWS
September 28, 2006 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ports along the Delaware River and mass-transit operators in Philadelphia and South Jersey have received more than $19 million in federal grants for improving security, the Homeland Security office said Tuesday. The money is part of a $400 million package of grants for upgrading the security of the nation's critical infrastructure, including ports and mass transit. The Delaware River port community will receive a combined $10.1 million - a slight increase over last year. Of that, the New Jersey ports of Camden and Paulsboro will share $5 million in grants for supporting a regional effort known as Harbor Watch.
NEWS
September 15, 2006 | By Michael Chertoff
This week, our nation paused to reflect on the five-year anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. We paused to remember the unimaginable evil of 19 men armed with box cutters and plane tickets. We paused to remember the victims of the attack: innocent men and women who perished on airplanes and in burning buildings, heroic first responders who gave their own lives trying to save them, and thousands more across our country who lost a loved one or a friend on that tragic day. But Americans also paused to ask an important question of their government: Are we safer since 9/11?
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