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NEWS
May 28, 2010
Reading Marta Teegen's new book, Homegrown: A Growing Guide for Creating a Cook's Garden in Raised Beds, Containers, and Small Spaces, I sensed that something was missing. Then it dawned on me. This may be the only gardening book around that doesn't have vivid illustrations. These are a pale, pale green, a curious and unsatisfying choice for a book about growing your own vegetables, herbs, and edible flowers. That said, Teegen has a pretty nice book here from Rodale ($19.99)
NEWS
April 11, 2008
If you're a gardener, run, don't walk, to your nearest laptop or bookstore to buy The Truth About Organic Gardening: Benefits, Drawbacks and the Bottom Line by Jeff Gillman. If you think you already know this stuff, trust me. You don't. Not unless, like Gillman, you're an ornamental-plant specialist with a master's degree in entomology, a doctorate in horticulture, and a resume that includes extensive research on pesticides and a tenured teaching gig in horticultural science at the University of Minnesota.
NEWS
July 22, 2011
The name Allan Armitage is a big draw for plant people, which means his updated edition of the 2000 classic Armitage's Garden Perennials is destined to sell well. Armitage is a horticulture professor at the University of Georgia, Athens, but more importantly, he does research on new garden plants and runs the university's trial gardens. In other words, he's the man - educated and horticulturally famous, with an endearing credo: "This is gardening, not brain surgery.
NEWS
July 30, 2010
The Nonstop Garden calls itself "a step-by-step guide to smart plant choices and four-season designs. " This being summer, the new book by Stephanie Cohen and Jennifer Benner (Timber Press, $19.95) is a perfect candidate for beach bag, bedside, or hammock. Cohen, of Collegeville, is known as "the perennial diva" and Benner used to be her editor at Fine Gardening magazine. They're a knowledgeable team, and it's instructive to explore their 248-page book. I looked up plants growing in my garden, ones that have flunked out or that I'm curious about.
NEWS
February 22, 2008
Nina Bassuk, a horticulture professor at Cornell University, is the 2008 recipient of the Scott Medal, given annually by Scott Arboretum, for her "national contributions to the art and science of gardening. " Bassuk is a tree lady with a passion for cities. For almost three decades, she has worked on finding tough plants to withstand stressful urban landscapes, and on making those landscapes less stressful. She developed something called "structural soil," for example, that permits tree roots to survive in compacted soil under sidewalks.
NEWS
July 27, 2007
A grande dame of designer showcases at the Jersey Shore, the annual Ruth Newman Shapiro Cancer and Heart Fund show house is going contemporary this year. "Meadows Edge," a 22-room fieldstone-and-clapboard home in Linwood, provides the setting for 22 designers from New Jersey and Pennsylvania to go a little more mod in their room presentations than in the past. Martha Hatrack and Christine Betsy of Kroungold's Furniture in Marlton took a dated great room and gave it hip leather Barcelona chairs and a zebra rug in a lounge area.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
For garden-lovers in the Philadelphia area - anywhere, really - there's a new book in town. Published by the University of Pennsylvania Press ($19.77 on Amazon.com), it's called Chanticleer: A Pleasure Garden , by Adrian Higgins with photos by Rob Cardillo. Higgins is the Washington Post's garden editor. Cardillo, who lives in Ambler, is a well-known garden photographer of the first order. In fact, his photographs - almost 100, culled from 4,000 taken over two growing seasons - often threaten to overshadow the prose, only because they're so extraordinary.
NEWS
September 14, 2007 | Virginia A. Smith, For The Inquirer
Gardeners can't ever buy enough high-quality, interesting plants and all manner of related stuff, which is one of many reasons to head for the fourth annual GardenFair at Winterthur this weekend. Seventy plant and garden exhibitors from 15 states will be selling everything from tools and outdoor furniture to herbs and trees. Free gardening lectures, how-to demonstrations, and workshops also run throughout the fair. Hank Schannen, owner of Rare Find Nursery in Jackson, N.J., in the northwestern tip of the Pine Barrens, is a GardenFair veteran.
NEWS
May 14, 2010
Most of us decide what to make for dinner, then choose the seasonings to go with it. Not Jeff Cox and Marie-Pierre Moine, authors of a new book called The Cook's Herb Garden (DK Publishing, $18). They do it the other way around. Regardless. If you like herbs and you like to cook, you'll find plenty to absorb in this small book - not just how to grow, harvest, and store 120 different herbs, but how to use them in interesting ways in the kitchen. Example: A friend gave me some sorrel last year and I've never done much with it. Here, I learned that what I have is garden sorrel, Rumex acetosa , which is tangy and sharp, as opposed to French sorrel, Rumex scutatus , which is milder, more lemony and succulent.
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