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NEWS
February 22, 2008
Nina Bassuk, a horticulture professor at Cornell University, is the 2008 recipient of the Scott Medal, given annually by Scott Arboretum, for her "national contributions to the art and science of gardening. " Bassuk is a tree lady with a passion for cities. For almost three decades, she has worked on finding tough plants to withstand stressful urban landscapes, and on making those landscapes less stressful. She developed something called "structural soil," for example, that permits tree roots to survive in compacted soil under sidewalks.
NEWS
July 27, 2007
A grande dame of designer showcases at the Jersey Shore, the annual Ruth Newman Shapiro Cancer and Heart Fund show house is going contemporary this year. "Meadows Edge," a 22-room fieldstone-and-clapboard home in Linwood, provides the setting for 22 designers from New Jersey and Pennsylvania to go a little more mod in their room presentations than in the past. Martha Hatrack and Christine Betsy of Kroungold's Furniture in Marlton took a dated great room and gave it hip leather Barcelona chairs and a zebra rug in a lounge area.
NEWS
July 30, 2010
The Nonstop Garden calls itself "a step-by-step guide to smart plant choices and four-season designs. " This being summer, the new book by Stephanie Cohen and Jennifer Benner (Timber Press, $19.95) is a perfect candidate for beach bag, bedside, or hammock. Cohen, of Collegeville, is known as "the perennial diva" and Benner used to be her editor at Fine Gardening magazine. They're a knowledgeable team, and it's instructive to explore their 248-page book. I looked up plants growing in my garden, ones that have flunked out or that I'm curious about.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
For garden-lovers in the Philadelphia area - anywhere, really - there's a new book in town. Published by the University of Pennsylvania Press ($19.77 on Amazon.com), it's called Chanticleer: A Pleasure Garden , by Adrian Higgins with photos by Rob Cardillo. Higgins is the Washington Post's garden editor. Cardillo, who lives in Ambler, is a well-known garden photographer of the first order. In fact, his photographs - almost 100, culled from 4,000 taken over two growing seasons - often threaten to overshadow the prose, only because they're so extraordinary.
NEWS
May 14, 2010
Most of us decide what to make for dinner, then choose the seasonings to go with it. Not Jeff Cox and Marie-Pierre Moine, authors of a new book called The Cook's Herb Garden (DK Publishing, $18). They do it the other way around. Regardless. If you like herbs and you like to cook, you'll find plenty to absorb in this small book - not just how to grow, harvest, and store 120 different herbs, but how to use them in interesting ways in the kitchen. Example: A friend gave me some sorrel last year and I've never done much with it. Here, I learned that what I have is garden sorrel, Rumex acetosa , which is tangy and sharp, as opposed to French sorrel, Rumex scutatus , which is milder, more lemony and succulent.
NEWS
November 2, 2007 | Eils Lotozo, For the Inquirer
It's obvious from the sumptuous spaces in Bunny Williams' Point of View: Three Decades of Decorating Elegant and Comfortable Houses (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $60) that the interior designer's clients come from the monied set. But it's also clear from her surprisingly down-to-earth text, which offers decorating wisdom along with a memoir of the people and things that shaped her as a designer, that she doesn't believe a big bankroll is required to create a welcoming home. "I don't want people to look at this book and think, 'I could never live in a house like that; I could never afford it,' " says Williams, who spent two decades with legendary design firm Parrish-Hadley before going out on her own. "It doesn't really matter if a chair cost $50 or $50,000.
NEWS
April 25, 2008
The American Art Pottery Association encompasses all periods and styles, president Arnie Small says. So the weekend events connected to its annual convention, being held for the first time in the Philadelphia area, will reflect the wide-ranging interests of collector and dealer members - from arts-and-crafts-era pieces to 1920s and '30s Rosewood and Weller to studio pottery from the latter half of the 20th century to the work of today's notable potters....
BUSINESS
January 18, 2009 | By Eileen Ambrose, BALTIMORE SUN
Last year was brutal for investors, but probably more so if you're a new retiree. Your nest egg could be significantly smaller just when you're starting to tap it. But before you get too discouraged and conclude that you'll have to go back to work, it's time to take a look at where you stand. Kirk Kinder, a financial planner in northern Maryland, has been doing just that for some of his retired clients who lost 10 percent to 18 percent of their portfolios in 2008. These retirees, who usually make modest yearly withdrawals from their portfolios, will not have to change their lifestyles even after going through the worst stock market since the Great Depression, he said.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2008
Q: What does rebalancing a portfolio mean? - H.C., Anderson, Ind. A: It involves tweaking the percentage of your portfolio in various holdings (such as stocks, bonds, etc.) by reallocating your money. Imagine that three years ago you invested in 10 companies, putting about 10 percent of your portfolio's value in each. If one of the firms has grown to represent 30 percent of your portfolio, you might rebalance by selling off some of that and reinvesting the money elsewhere. Rebalancing isn't always best.
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