CollectionsPostage Stamp
IN THE NEWS

Postage Stamp

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 3, 1993
If the U.S. Postal Service can put Elvis' (younger) face on a postage stamp, why can't a similar honor go to a man credited with saving as many as 100,000 Hungarian Jews during World War II? As the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee meets today to discuss future stamp programs, Ilene Munetz Pachman is praying that Raoul Wallenberg will make it to the short list. Ms. Pachman, a Bucks County woman, has created a national movement to lobby for a stamp commemorating Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish diplomat and honorary U.S. citizen who risked his life to help Jews escape the death sentence of the Holocaust.
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
An overflow crowd packed the sanctuary and the balconies of Mother Bethel AME Church and the first floor of its Fellowship Hall Tuesday for a ceremony celebrating the new stamp in honor of Richard Allen, founder of the historic house of worship. The stamp's release coincides with the 200th anniversary of the 1816 conference of African American Methodist ministers called by Allen to form a new independent African Methodist Episcopal Church. Allen was born into slavery on Feb. 14, 1760 on an estate owned by Philadelphian Benjamin Chew.
LIVING
February 1, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You say you've never heard of Ernest Everett Just? Join the herd. Even among obscure scientists doing arcane research, Just would appear to be second-string - an early 20th-century biologist who died at age 58 after spending most of his career thinking deep thoughts about cell surfaces. A better subject for the tie-breaking question on College Bowl than a candidate for a United States postage stamp, it would seem. But Just has juice. Members of the influential college fraternity he founded lionize him, scholars extoll his achievements, and New Jersey businessman Don Lyons seems to reserve a place of honor for Just somewhere between God and Thomas Alva Edison.
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | By Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Vendetti is a man with a mission. Several missions, in fact. He has tirelessly campaigned for a postage stamp honoring Stephen Girard, a man he thinks history and the U.S. Postal Service have unfairly snubbed. He picketed Pennsylvania Hospital for three years to try to get a monument to Mary Lum Girard, Girard's wife, who spent 25 years in the hospital. There's more. Vendetti, a lifelong South Philadelphian, wants recognition for Italian Americans who were restricted in their travel or investigated during World War II. He wants a lottery to help reduce the national debt.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | Inquirer photographs by Ron Tarver
From an office hardly bigger than a postage stamp, Postmaster Geoff Loughery and his wife, Rita, have provided mail services for the last decade to 110 people in Salford, Montgomery County. The post office is in a converted, 8-by-17-foot garage in the Loughery home - one of the few remaining post offices in the state to be run out of a private home. Old-timers say the building also housed a post office at the turn of the century.
NEWS
September 10, 1987 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
LAS BRISAS, Third and Cahtarine Streets. (625-0690), (9/4/87) $$ This spanking new bistro in Queen Village is cozy, casual and sleekly but simply done up in pink, black and white. The problem is the postage stamp sized California/Mexican menu that doesn't contain enough variety but more importantly few real standouts to bring you back a second time. One visit may be merited, however. Recommended: broiled snapper ($10.95), "death by chocolate" ($3.50). Rating: Good . Very Good . Splendid . . Worth a 45-mile detour, and a change of plans.
NEWS
July 25, 1992
The guy who draws Olive Oyl just lost his job. Why? Because his employers didn't like the way Popeye's ladyfriend was talking. Instead of the time-honored "Help, Popeye, help!," Ms. Oyl was declaiming that she will do what she wants with her life, no matter what some man says. No doubt this bodes ill for Bluto, a cerfified swine if ever there was one. In this "year of the woman" that everybody keeps declaring, it will bode ill for many another villain, especially if Ms. Oyl takes her beliefs to the polls.
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | By BARRY SPARKS
Pinnacles of success are relative to one's profession and endeavor. A Nobel Peace Prize, a Pulitzer Prize, election into the Baseball Hall of Fame, an Oscar - all are reserved for a select few. Yet one is more likely to receive any of these prestigious awards than to have one's portrait on a United States postage stamp. That is largely thanks to the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee, which for two decades has maintained an absurd policy that no living person may be honored by a commemorative stamp, and no postal item may be issued sooner than 10 years after an individual's death.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mexican surrealist Frida Kahlo, whose life was depicted in her art, will be honored with a 34-cent commemorative next week from the U.S. Postal Service. Kahlo is the first Hispanic woman to be honored with a U.S. postage stamp, said the Postal Service. The design shows a self-portrait of Kahlo. Kahlo (1907-1954) took up art at 18 while recuperating from serious injuries she suffered in a bus accident. She uncovered a talent that she parlayed into art that was to dazzle and even shock the world.
NEWS
June 16, 2008
CALL US a little biased, but we can't think of any athlete whose likeness should next grace a U.S. postage stamp more than Wilt Chamberlain's. (OK, maybe Muhammad Ali, but fortunately he doesn't fit one post-office criterion for stamp honorees: they must be deceased at least five years.) We believe that The Dipper's inclusion should be a slam dunk, but that's not up to us. That's up to the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee. But it needs to hear from you: Write and tell them why Wilt, who died in 1999 and was considered the greatest basketball player to ever play the game, deserves the honor.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
An overflow crowd packed the sanctuary and the balconies of Mother Bethel AME Church and the first floor of its Fellowship Hall Tuesday for a ceremony celebrating the new stamp in honor of Richard Allen, founder of the historic house of worship. The stamp's release coincides with the 200th anniversary of the 1816 conference of African American Methodist ministers called by Allen to form a new independent African Methodist Episcopal Church. Allen was born into slavery on Feb. 14, 1760 on an estate owned by Philadelphian Benjamin Chew.
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Staff Writer
MANY Philadelphians know that Richard Allen founded Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church after he and fellow pastor Absalom Jones led a walkout from St. George's Methodist Church in Old City in 1787 to protest segregated seating. But V. Yvonne Studevan is certain that most folks don't know about Allen's other civic and humanitarian deeds. "He just made such an impact on the world," said Studevan, a descendant of Allen's. Long before the Civil War, Allen wrote pamphlets calling for the abolition of slavery and helped former slaves find refuge.
SPORTS
December 5, 2014
THE KNICKS came slithering out to play the Warriors back in the day, mischief in their eyes, malice in their hearts. They were all, every bleeping one of them, wearing rubber bands on their wrists, taunting Wilt Chamberlain, trying to embarrass him. Wilt got mad. And then he got even. Slapped 100 on them later on in that '62 season. One hundred points, including an amazing Halley's Comet, solar eclipse, Red Sea-parting 28 of 32 free throws. Posed with a white sheet of paper in the Hershey Arena locker room afterward, after statman Harvey Pollack scrawled "100" on it. Check out Wilt's right wrist in that photo.
SPORTS
October 3, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
IT WAS A TALL ORDER, but the U.S. Postal Service was up to the task. Yesterday, it unveiled the images of two Wilt Chamberlain forever stamps, one of him as a Philadelphia Warrior and the other as a Los Angeles Laker. The stamps are long and lean, just like the Big Dipper in his prime. At just over 2 inches in length, they are one-third larger than most commemoratives. The U.S. Postal Service and the Sixers, along with the NBA, will formally dedicate the stamps and show a tribute video during halftime of the Sixers vs. Oklahoma City Thunder game on Friday, Dec. 5, at the Wells Fargo Center.
SPORTS
May 16, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
A POSTAGE stamp for Wilt? According to a recent report, the late Wilt Chamberlain, an NBA star who starred at Overbrook High, is on the short list of those being considered for next year's U.S. Stamp Program. In the upcoming May 27 issue of Linn's Stamp News, Bill McAllister reports that Wilt, the Beatles, Elizabeth Taylor, Steve Jobs, Julia Child, Sarah Vaughn and James Brown are among those on the list. According to Donald Hunt, of the Philadelphia Tribune, the Chamberlain stamp is tentatively scheduled to be issued in February, which coincides with Black History Month.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011 | By Dana Vogel, Inquirer Staff Writer
African American history traditionally is celebrated in February, but organizers of the Black History Showcase want to highlight cultural achievements a lot more often. This Saturday and Sunday mark the seventh year of the showcase produced by Everett & Associates with the Proud African American Foundation. Showcase founder Everett Staten moved the event to April this year to avoid winter storms and to begin a quest to celebrate black history all year round. Founded to promote a greater awareness and appreciation of African American culture, the showcase will feature a mix of exhibits and activities centered on the annual theme "real people, real artifacts, and real stories.
NEWS
June 16, 2008
CALL US a little biased, but we can't think of any athlete whose likeness should next grace a U.S. postage stamp more than Wilt Chamberlain's. (OK, maybe Muhammad Ali, but fortunately he doesn't fit one post-office criterion for stamp honorees: they must be deceased at least five years.) We believe that The Dipper's inclusion should be a slam dunk, but that's not up to us. That's up to the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee. But it needs to hear from you: Write and tell them why Wilt, who died in 1999 and was considered the greatest basketball player to ever play the game, deserves the honor.
SPORTS
June 5, 2007 | By MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
Someone once observed that nobody wins the U.S. Open. Instead, it wins you. That was never more evident than last June at Winged Foot. Padraig Harrington could have won, but he made bogeys on the last three holes and lost by two. Jim Furyk could have won, but made two bogeys on the last four holes and lost by one. Colin Montgomerie could have won, but he made a double bogey on the last hole and finished a shot back. And Phil Mickelson could have won but he also made a double on the last hole to come up a stroke short.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2002 | By Dominic Sama FOR THE INQUIRER
The Black Heritage Series of commemoratives celebrates its 25th year next Friday with a 34-cent stamp marking the birth centennial of poet and writer Langston Hughes. Hughes was a prolific chronicler of black life in America from the 1920s through the 1960s. He wrote 16 books of poems, two novels, three collections of short stories, four volumes of editorial and documentary fiction, 20 plays, musicals and operas, three autobiographies, and numerous radio and television scripts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mexican surrealist Frida Kahlo, whose life was depicted in her art, will be honored with a 34-cent commemorative next week from the U.S. Postal Service. Kahlo is the first Hispanic woman to be honored with a U.S. postage stamp, said the Postal Service. The design shows a self-portrait of Kahlo. Kahlo (1907-1954) took up art at 18 while recuperating from serious injuries she suffered in a bus accident. She uncovered a talent that she parlayed into art that was to dazzle and even shock the world.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|