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NEWS
July 11, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Postal Service, riding a crest of spectacular sales with its Legends of American Music Series of commemoratives, will issue Wednesday a booklet of 29-cent stamps recalling four famous Broadway musicals. The commemoratives, 20 to a booklet, will depict scenes from My Fair Lady, Porgy and Bess, Show Boat and Oklahoma! The stamp for Oklahoma! was issued earlier this year as a separate sheet of 40 stamps. The issuance will coincide with the 100th anniversary of Broadway.
NEWS
September 12, 2011
By Bill Bonvie The 1997 movie The Postman depicted one man's attempt to reintroduce cohesion to society following the collapse of civilization. The hero, played by Kevin Costner, is at first pretending to be a postal representative of a newly restored U.S. government. Eventually, however, his charade morphs into a mission, as he inspires a group of young recruits to begin reinstituting postal service while battling a self-styled warlord and his army. It's not my favorite film, but The Postman does convey how essential basic government services such as mail delivery are to our very existence as a country.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL VIOLA
Consider the possibilities, shoppers: 33 oak and mahogany desks, 40 telephones, 164 calculators, motorized drafting tables and 108 typewriters, all of which go on sale at 9 a.m. today at the U.S. Postal Service's Equipment Facility at Tenth Street and Pattison Avenue. The occasion is the first auction of excess postal equipment at the Philadelphia Division of the Postal Service. In all, hundreds of used and surplus items, right down to pencil sharpeners and doormats, will be for sale.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | By Michael Mehle, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The U.S. Postal Service, which plans to increase the cost of a first-class stamp to 30 cents because it is losing money, spent as much as $10 million on conferences last year, including $99-a-person meals and a $12,000 reception, a government study reported yesterday. According to the General Accounting Office, the investigative arm of Congress, conferences were held at resorts in Hawaii, Arizona and Florida, usually during winter months. Also, the Postal Service awarded bonuses averaging $5,564 to each of the 75 division general managers in 1988, when postal costs went up at twice the rate of inflation, the Washington Post reported.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Randolph E. Schmid, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Senators announced a bipartisan plan Wednesday to help keep the Postal Service solvent and continue six-day mail delivery for at least two more years. The proposal would lift the agency "from the brink of bankruptcy," said Sen. Joe Lieberman, chairman of the Senate Homeland and Governmental Affairs Committee. The Postal Service lost $8 billion last year and could report even larger losses when its 2011 budget year report comes out in mid-November. "We're not crying wolf here" about the agency, said Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, the top Republican on the committee.
NEWS
December 10, 2008
IT WAS WITH concern that I read the recent Daily News articles regarding mail service. Employees of Philadelphia District of the Postal Service are committed to delivering consistent, reliable service to all of our 1.7 million customers. A dedicated phone line has been established for our customers to talk directly with a postal representative if they experience service issues. It will be open Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The number is 215-863-5049. We've reached out to our network of business and industry leaders, and to the executive committee of the Philadelphia Postal Customer Council, to discuss and identify any service concerns.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2011 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A prominent Democratic lawyer and former member of the board of governors of the U.S. Postal Service has been accused of misconduct for pressing postal officials to settle a real estate dispute involving a friend and political ally. Alan Kessler, a partner at the Center City firm of Duane Morris L.L.P., repeatedly urged Postal Service lawyers to consider settlement proposals and helped principals of a Sarasota, Fla., real estate firm to craft their position even as they were battling his own agency, said a report from the Postal Service inspector general.
NEWS
December 21, 1993
Yesterday was supposed to be the busiest mail day of the year. That's what the Postal Service was predicting last week, given the track record of Christmases past. It's the day, typically, when folks face the music, as it were, and dump off the last of those rubber-banded stacks of cards and boxes lovingly stuffed with goodies for grown children who can't make it home for the holidays. To give you an idea of just how overwhelming the crunch is, the Postal Service delivers about 80 million pieces on a normal day. Around this time of year, the haul can soar up around the 300 million mark.
NEWS
December 1, 1987 | By Tom Webb, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The U.S. Postal Service thought it sounded sensible: By cutting the size of the popular Christmas postage stamps, the post office would save money and everyone would be happy. So is everybody jolly? No, they are not. The Postal Service has been pelted with so many complaints about its Scrooge-size Christmas stamps that it's planning to return to the larger version next year. "Most of the people who use the smaller stamps and don't like it complain that it's too difficult to handle," said Hugh McGonigle, a post office spokesman with the title of Philatelic Programs Specialist.
NEWS
December 6, 2008 | By DAVE DAVIES & KITTY CAPARELLA, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
The U.S. Postal Service has shaken up its Philadelphia-area management after a week of stories in the Daily News about late and missing mail deliveries. Frank Neri, the Postal Service district manager for the Philadelphia metropolitan district, was replaced yesterday by Jim Gallagher, a veteran USPS manager, spokesman Paul Smith confirmed yesterday. Gallagher "was postmaster here in Philly for six years," Smith said. "He's been in Philly virtually his whole career with extensive operational experience in both mail processing and operations.
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BUSINESS
July 21, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 8,000 union letter carriers - members of the National Association of Letter Carriers, or NALC - will arrive in Philadelphia on Sunday for one of the city's largest conventions this year. They, and their families, 12,000 in all, will be everywhere. They will show up at the Convention Center in a sea of colors, with carriers wearing vests color-coded by region. On Tuesday, 4,500 of them will occupy Citizens Bank Park to watch the Phillies take on the San Francisco Giants.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph J. MacNamara, 85, of Turnersville, a former Defense Department contract administrator in Moorestown and Camden, died of cancer Tuesday, June 17, at home. Born in West Philadelphia, he attended West Catholic High School and transferred to a seminary of the Augustinian religious order on Staten Island, N.Y., a son, Joseph J. Jr., said. After two years there, Mr. MacNamara worked as a radar technician on the aircraft carrier Oriskany. From 1950 to 1960, he was a teller for First Pennsylvania Bank, and until 1963, he worked for the IRS. Mr. MacNamara began his 30-year Defense Department career in 1963 as a contract administrator at a Center City office, his son said.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN REX PARKER joined the city's Licenses and Inspections Department in the early '90s, the place was jumping. Bennett Levin had taken over the often-troubled department in 1992 and began to crack heads. He prowled the city looking for code violators; he went after contractors who failed to get permits for construction jobs; he knocked down former crack houses and abandoned buildings harboring drugs, the homeless and rats. And Rex Parker, as Levin's deputy, was with him every step of the way. "He would size up a situation and get it cleaned up," said his daughter, Karen Parker.
TRAVEL
December 2, 2013 | By Linda Tuccio-Koonz, For The Inquirer
I wasn't sure if I was ready for my first kiss, but as the catamaran eased from the dock on Grand Cayman - heading deeper into the translucent, turquoise waters of the Caribbean Sea - I felt a growing sense of excitement. The crewmen introduced themselves and ticked off the rules of the vessel. Captain Jack Sparrow wasn't among them, but there were other characters. "If you fall overboard, yell out your first and last name," said one. "Say it loudly and clearly, so we can cross you off the passenger list before we motor off!"
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Andrew Miga, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Americans for generations have come to depend on door-to-door mail delivery. It's about as American as apple pie. But with the Postal Service facing billions of dollars in annual losses, the delivery service could be virtually phased out by 2022 under a proposal a House panel was considering Wednesday. Curbside delivery, which includes deliveries to mailboxes at the end of driveways, and cluster box delivery would replace letter carriers slipping mail into front-door boxes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
If the adage that absence makes the heart grow fonder needed validation, the Postal Service's show at the Mann Center on Monday night made a powerful argument in its favor. As a performing entity, their existence was barely a blip: a brief tour surrounding the release of their sole album, Give Up , in 2003, and then nothing. But in the intervening decade, what began as a side-project lark became a commercial behemoth, the second-biggest seller in the history of the Seattle label Sub Pop, surpassed only by Nirvana's Bleach . Singer Ben Gibbard and laptop wizard Jimmy Tamborello kept busy with their musical day jobs in Death Cab for Cutie and Dntel, respectively, but questions about a follow-up album never died down.
NEWS
May 25, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Down the long line, the smoke of muskets and artillery boiled from the landscape, marking the collision point of Union and Confederate forces at the Battle of Gettysburg. That moment was captured in an 1887 chromolithograph by Thure de Thulstrup (1848-1930), a Swedish-born artist who became an illustrator for Harper's Weekly after the Civil War. And on Thursday, a reproduction of it appeared on a newly issued stamp from the U.S. Postal Service, commemorating the 150th anniversary of the epic clash.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JABEZ AUSTIN wrote everything down. A thought or idea or opinion didn't pop into his head without his writing it in his journal. He also recorded the everyday doings of his life. He even had a title for the book he hoped his musings would someday create: The Tale that Wags the Dog: An Essay of Black Influence in America . Jabez Thomas Austin Jr., son of a Southern Baptist preacher, 33-year employee of the Postal Service, Air Force veteran and devoted family man, died May 5 of heart failure.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Pauline Jelinek, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - What business gets more customers every year, yet keeps losing money? The U.S. Postal Service delivers mail to 11 million more homes, offices, and other addresses than it did a decade ago, even as the amount of mail that people in the United States receive has dropped sharply. That combination may be financially dicey, some analysts say. "The more delivery points they have to service, the higher their costs" in fuel, time spent, and other areas, said Rick Geddes, associate professor in Cornell University's department of policy analysis and management.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Keana Bloomfield, J.R. MASTERMAN HIGH SCHOOL
As the U.S. Postal Service struggles to stay afloat in a rapidly changing world, could it be that social media are helping to push it over the edge? Could technology put a "forever stamp" on snail mail? "We can't continue to operate on a precipice," Joe Corbett, the United States Postal Service's chief financial officer, said at a recent news conference. Coupled with the worst recession in 80 years, the USPS is facing challenges as the world of letters, postcards and stamps has taken a backseat in the millennium of e-mail, Facebook and Twitter.
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