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Postcards

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TRAVEL
November 13, 2011
Postcard apps are getting better. Many send real postcards from smartphone images; with this app, though, postcards are created so quickly that you can spend more time taking the perfect photo. Name: Postcard on the Run Available for: Android and iPhone What it does: Helps you turn smartphone camera images into real postcards that can be sent anywhere in the world. Cost: The app is free, but mailing the postcards starts at $1.49. What's hot: Don't sweat it if you don't have a person's mailing address.
NEWS
November 8, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rest easy, Philadelphia. Daniel Bloom of Juneau is facing the long Alaskan winter surrounded by the warmth of your postcards. For reasons that even he finds difficult to understand, Bloom called The Inquirer to complain that weather maps in newspapers in "the lower 48" omitted Alaska altogether or positioned it in the Pacific Ocean off Los Angeles. For reasons that even I find difficult to understand, orders were given that Bloom's complaint was to be duly noted on the pages of this, a generally serious and respectable publication.
NEWS
October 17, 2010
Nowadays, it's easy to become too dependent on wireless communication gadgets. Apostcardaday.blogspot.com reminds us of times when life was simpler. What's hot: Readers get to view a postcard each day from a different part of the world from the collections of Sheila Milne, of Dover, England, and her father. Some listings add notes about the card's significance or a quotation from its back. Scroll down the right side of the home page to find an archive by destination or topic, or click on the interactive map to see recent postcards by geography.
NEWS
November 3, 2001
From the mouths of kids: A thoughtful and sensitive reader wrote a letter to the editor this week suggesting a way America could get around this anthrax mail problem. Mike LaRosa is just 11, but despite his young age - or perhaps because of it - he proposed a remedy that is impressively straightforward. Send more postcards, Mike said. The young man was talking about Christmas cards, and his special concern is postal workers and their potential exposure to spores lurking within sealed envelopes.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The park in "Postcards from Paradise Park" is a place for trailer homes, and it's where a pompous ad exec winds up after losing his wife and his job. If this sounds familiar, it may be because "Postcards" follows the same general arc as "Lost in America," Albert Brooks' comedy about a big-shot ad man who also hits rock bottom in a mobile home. "Lost in America" was a mini-classic, anticipating and defining the kind of midlife issues that "Postcards" also explores, though not as memorably.
NEWS
February 12, 2003 | By Leslie A. Pappas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Pennsburg, Montgomery County, nostalgia costs 50 cents. Stacked neatly on three racks inside Heimbach Bros. Do-It-Yourself Center on Main Street, it comes in postcards of the Shady Nook, Knight's Covered Bridge, the Teen-Canteen: places that disappeared years ago but live still in the minds of local residents. "They cover the full gamut of history very well, from old buildings to industries to the churches," said local historian Vic Stahl, 91. "I think that's the prime purpose behind it. To keep those things alive.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The federal government says a new designation as a "Promise Zone" holds the possibility of transforming a big, ailing chunk of West Philadelphia. Robert Morris Skaler can remember when the area didn't need a zone to have promise. He was born there, grew up there, and forever after remained interested in the place and its potential. As a boy, he lived on the boundary of Mantua and Belmont, an area that in the 1940s held not just a healthy middle-class population but something that to him was more intriguing: a stock of big Victorian and Italianate houses, the envy of any in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 11, 2002 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Picture postcards of places in Bucks County that still exist or have long vanished will be on display Saturday through Nov. 30 at the Mercer Museum, Pine and Ashland Streets, Doylestown. "Greetings From Bucks County" includes postcards that date from 1900 to 1960. It also examines the origins and art of the postcard. An opening celebration will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, when visitors can bring old postcards for appraisal, make a novelty postcard, hear a talk about themes in postcard collecting, and see and discuss early views of Yardley.
NEWS
January 10, 2000 | By Matt Zager, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lavender crocuses peeking through fresh snow. A majestic, centuries-old tree. A historic barn shrouded in early-morning fog. These are the scenes of Bucks County captured by photographer John D. Sikora of Yardley in his 2000 calendar. "The advantage to [photographing] Bucks County is the river and canal and the whole dynamics between the western and eastern regions - from the cliffs and rocks to the flat land," Sikora said. "In Montgomery County, you don't have that dramaticness.
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Helene Meier knew where to turn when she saw the notice in her apartment building that described a dying child in England who was trying to collect enough postcards to find immortality in the Guinness Book of World Records. She knew her sixth graders at St. Elizabeth's parish school at 23d and Berks Streets would jump at the chance to write postcards to a leukemia victim named David at an elementary school north of London. The principal, Sister Denise Ware, decided to get the whole school involved with the project.
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NEWS
July 24, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: While our daughter was on vacation with our small grandkids, she bought them postcards and suggested they write us about their vacation. She said she laughed when the kids finished with the cards because she hadn't realized they didn't know how to write a postcard. The children had turned the cards sideways and had written across the entire card from top to bottom. Not wanting to hurt their feelings, she found a half-inch space on one side and, in tiny print, wrote our names and address.
NEWS
May 15, 2016
Postcards from the Dead Letter Office By Dawn Manning Burlesque Press. 69 pp. $14.99 Reviewed by Frank Wilson Tanka, Dawn Manning explains in her introduction to these poems, is a very old form of Japanese lyric poetry, dating back more than 1,300 years. It is more expansive than the later haiku form, boasting 31 sound units (called on ) compared to haiku's mere 17. Those 17 syllables are admirably concise. But a 31-syllable tanka, Manning points put, "can feel long, so it is more accurate to think of a tanka as a five-line poem that can be said in about two breaths.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2016 | By Dawn Fallik, For The Inquirer
One postcard was a simple picture of London's Leicester Square tube stop. It read: "He said 'You can fall in love and live a lifetime in just a moment. And then he was gone. 30 years later, I still dream about the boy I never knew. " Another card, postmarked Denver, stated: "I just turned 37 and still hope for money in my birthday cards. " Every week, PostSecret creator Frank Warren gets hundreds of postcards at his home at 13345 Cooper Ridge Rd., Germantown, Md., 20874. The former suicide hotline counselor started putting his home address out in the public eye in 2005.
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
Kathleen Moon won't be voting in the New Hampshire primary Tuesday, but she's arguably more invested in Granite State politics than most of its residents. The 57-year-old proprietor and chef of Laughing Horse Lodge, a bed-and-breakfast in Swan Lake, Mont., has spent the last month driving from village to village in New Hampshire playing political tourist while getting up-close-and-personal with the presidential candidates. As of the middle of last week, she had seen seven make their pitches.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
On the 50th anniversary of the Beatles' debut on The Ed Sullivan Show, I'm listening (OK, singing along) to the Fab Four at the Scottish Rite Auditorium in Collingswood. Sunday's concert, billed as the ultimate tribute, promised "note-for-note renditions" so "uncanny" as to persuade us we were watching "the real thing. " It turns out the talented professional mop-tops on the stage are convincing, at least musically. As for the visuals, the skinny suits are sleek, "Paul" is adorable, and "George" is plausible, but "Ringo" and "John" look about as much like their counterparts as I do. Maybe less.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The federal government says a new designation as a "Promise Zone" holds the possibility of transforming a big, ailing chunk of West Philadelphia. Robert Morris Skaler can remember when the area didn't need a zone to have promise. He was born there, grew up there, and forever after remained interested in the place and its potential. As a boy, he lived on the boundary of Mantua and Belmont, an area that in the 1940s held not just a healthy middle-class population but something that to him was more intriguing: a stock of big Victorian and Italianate houses, the envy of any in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Recognized as one of the world's preeminent fiber artists, Lenore Tawney (1907-2007) also had a magical touch with paper. Her collages, assemblages, and postcards are being displayed side by side with her fiber-art pieces at the University of the Art's Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery in one half of the two-venue exhibition "Lenore Tawney: Wholly Unlooked For. " It's a tandem effort with the Maryland Institute College of Art, which is showing Tawney's drawings, weavings,...
TRAVEL
February 3, 2013 | By Barry Sussmann, For The Inquirer
Thirty-four years and what looked like a century ago, I traveled inside what was then known as Red China. With official United States recognition approaching, the People's Republic opened its doors. Having studied in Taiwan, I received a limited visa and missed the Great Wall and other sites. After teaching Chinese culture for 30 years, I returned in November. What we saw on my return was more contemporary than I anticipated, and being there was inspiring. Here were 12-lane highways intersecting modern, crowded cities; stores with merchandise aplenty; and a fashionably dressed, vibrant people.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2013 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
February, the most fleeting month of the year, will offer four sales featuring paper ephemera, including autographs; historical and political correspondence; postcards and greeting cards; and a bird's-eye view of Manhattan by Currier & Ives. The autographs, including signed books and photographs of theatrical figures, such as Spencer Tracy in Army uniform, will be included in Freeman's sale at 2 p.m. Feb. 12 of books and manuscripts. The sale is being billed as a prelude to Freeman's much bigger sale on April 4 and 5, which will offer two major collections.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne
As we were leaving the temple of Angkor Wat a boy who looked to be about 10 years old sidled up alongside us. It's hard to guess someone's age in Cambodia, where the people are slight, even by Asian standards. His little legs matched our stride as he walked with us and offered to sell 10 postcards for a dollar. After touring Asia for two months, we've grown accustomed to aggressive hawkers, so we usually put on our game face and stoically work our way through the throngs selling everything from T-shirts to ginseng to who knows what.
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