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Postcards

NEWS
May 1, 1998 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Residents are so fed up with a 48.9 percent school tax increase that they are mailing postcards to their district's state legislators in protest. Members of the Pemberton Borough Home and School Association are going door to door, asking residents to sign postcards addressed to State Sen. Robert Singer and Assemblymen Melvin Cottrell and Joe Malone. The postcards - 250 of which have already been mailed - ask the officials for relief from an increase that will cost the owner of a typical home $650 more a year.
NEWS
August 11, 1996 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Most postcard collections are crooked arrangements held by magnets to refrigerator doors. Bill Supplee Sr.'s collection stuffs dozens of albums and fill boxes that line the floor of his living room. Last time he counted, Supplee had 3,500 postcards. It is not the size of the collection that's unusual; it's the subject. Supplee's albums do not contain scenes of drive-through redwood trees, Hawaiian dancers or 1950s highway attractions. The collection is made up entirely of Chester County scenes.
NEWS
July 12, 1993 | By Jayne Feld, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a city that thrives on its reputation as one of the nation's oldest resort towns, there's something old and familiar about the postcard display outside Ricker's Gift Shop on the Boardwalk. Like historical flashcards, the brightly colored, commissioned pictures depict old, lavish hotels - some with model-T Fords parked out front - landscapes and naval barracks that disappeared long ago. Scenes of modestly dressed bathers under vividly patterned umbrellas capture beaches that were once much bigger.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1992 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the next time you're on a business trip and missing your family - and they are missing you as well - consultant Andrea Claster has a suggestion. As soon as you hang up from a routine telephone call to your spouse, find a florist and order flowers sent to your home. "Flowers are spontaneous and convenient and can go a long way toward making things right," said Claster, a specialist in advising companies on gift-giving. "No one gets upset about getting flowers. " Claster's underlying message is that all business travelers, whether they make just one or two trips a year or seem to be always on the road, should pay attention to the needs of the families and friends left at home.
NEWS
September 6, 1995 | By John Woestendiek, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 11,000 postcards from Philadelphians opposed to congressional cuts in federal housing programs were deposited yesterday in an eight-foot- tall cardboard mailbox, and were to be delivered today to elected officials in Washington. The postcards, addressed to President Clinton and Pennsylvania's senators and representatives, say the proposed Department of Housing and Urban Development cutbacks, now before the Senate, are inhumane and would lead to increased homelessness.
NEWS
July 14, 1996 | By Allie Shah, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The way local architect Robert Skaler sees it, postcards are more than a cheap excuse for a letter. They are historical artifacts, worthy of preservation. "You should really save them," he said in a recent interview at his home, where he keeps a collection of 4,000 cards. Along with their artistic and sentimental value, a legion of collectors say, postcards can be historically significant. George Miller is an English professor at the University of Delaware in Newark and author of two books on postcards.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Flipping through her albums of turn-of-the-century postcards, Betty Davis sees Bucks County as it was 100 years ago. Last week, as she tutored visitors on the finer points of postcard collecting, Davis stopped and pointed out a picture of the Wycombe train station. "Newton worked for the railroad, you know," she said, speaking as if she were talking about a long-lost friend or relative. "Newton" was Newton Arnold, one of the two Arnold brothers who produced a line of postcards favored by collectors of Bucks County memorabilia, Davis said.
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | By Geoff Mulvihill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The search for Celina Janette Mays, a Willingboro 13-year-old who has been missing since Dec. 15, is going into homes nationwide. Celina is featured on postcards mailed to up to 73 million homes nationwide this week by Advo Inc., a Hartford, Conn., direct-mailing company. Celina was nine months pregnant when she disappeared from a home in the Country Club section, where she lived with her father, her stepmother and about a dozen other members of the Gospel of Christ Church, a Mount Holly congregation led by Celina's aunt.
NEWS
July 25, 2001 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Alice Steer Wilson, 74, whose watercolor scenes of Cape May have graced thousands of postcards, died Sunday from breast cancer at her Merchantville home. Mrs. Wilson found a niche with watercolors that have appeared and been praised at numerous art exhibitions, from the Chalfonte Hotel in Cape May, to the Perkins Center for the Arts in Moorestown, to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Fellowship. But the reproductions of her Cape May scenes on postcards and note cards are known far beyond the area.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Recognized as one of the world's preeminent fiber artists, Lenore Tawney (1907-2007) also had a magical touch with paper. Her collages, assemblages, and postcards are being displayed side by side with her fiber-art pieces at the University of the Art's Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery in one half of the two-venue exhibition "Lenore Tawney: Wholly Unlooked For. " It's a tandem effort with the Maryland Institute College of Art, which is showing Tawney's drawings, weavings,...
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