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Postcards

NEWS
July 24, 2005 | By Jennifer Gold
Earlier this month, hundreds of thousands of people gathered in Philly to advocate relief of Africa's crushing debt and pervasive poverty and hunger - incredibly worthy and complex goals. Me, I'm a bit obsessed with a much smaller, less important goal but one still worth pursuing. I am standing in the periodicals aisle at Borders, shaking all the periodicals upside down, then collecting and counting all the postcards that fall out. Three tumble out from Fortune. Glamour lets go four.
SPORTS
February 9, 2005 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To walk through the Jacksonville airport at 6:30 a.m. Monday was like a stroll down Bourbon Street the day after Mardi Gras. The fun was over for Eagles fans. All they could feel was a Super Bowl hangover. Dejected followers sprawled uncomfortably across airport chairs the morning after the Eagles lost, 24-21, to the New England Patriots. Still wearing their festive green beads and No. 81 jerseys, they grumpily awaited northbound flights to a city where people were just as depressed, but had not shelled out $3,000 apiece for the kicked-in-the-gut feeling.
NEWS
February 5, 2005 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
At first blush, picture postcards may seem like a trivial kind of collectible. Mass-produced, you might say. Like collecting pebbles, you might say. But the 70,000 cards that will be offered by Barry S. Slosberg tomorrow in Port Richmond reveal a diversity far more complex than variations on "Wish you were here. " That's one reason so many people collect them, said Spencer Gorman, who cataloged the sale: "Cards are the second-largest area of collection, after stamps and ahead of coins.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2005 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
For the next four months, Reading is celebrating the life and career of Samuel L. Schmucker, a city native who worked as a commercial artist during the golden age of American illustration a century ago. Schmucker isn't as big a name in the field as Maxfield Parrish or Jessie Willcox Smith, his classmates at the Howard Pyle Institute at what is now Drexel University. But he did make a significant contribution to postcard art at a time early in the 20th century when postcard-collecting flourished.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of Bob Seger's most poignant songs is titled "Beautiful Loser. " It kept playing in my head as I watched this lovely and ineffectual environmental film from Disney. Sacred Planet is an Imax feature that is dazzling yet superfluous. Stunning shots of natural serenity, from Utah's Bryce Canyon National Park to enormous Buddhist statues in the jungles of Thailand, are contrasted with sped-up scenes of urban bustle at airports and malls. Hmmm, sunsets over the desert vs. rush-hour traffic jams - kind of stacking the deck, don't you think?
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