CollectionsPostcards
IN THE NEWS

Postcards

ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2005 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
For the next four months, Reading is celebrating the life and career of Samuel L. Schmucker, a city native who worked as a commercial artist during the golden age of American illustration a century ago. Schmucker isn't as big a name in the field as Maxfield Parrish or Jessie Willcox Smith, his classmates at the Howard Pyle Institute at what is now Drexel University. But he did make a significant contribution to postcard art at a time early in the 20th century when postcard-collecting flourished.
SPORTS
February 3, 2005 | By Phil Sheridan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Getting to the beach is a breeze. Parking at the beach is a breeze. Everything about Jacksonville Beach is a breeze except the breeze. It's more of a gale. The rain is coming in sideways. It's like being on the set of The Perfect Storm, and you're George Clooney. It is 47 degrees, and the wind makes it feel closer to 30. The rain doesn't help. There isn't another living soul on this stretch of beach except for a bird. It is walking against the wind and appears to be muttering to itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of Bob Seger's most poignant songs is titled "Beautiful Loser. " It kept playing in my head as I watched this lovely and ineffectual environmental film from Disney. Sacred Planet is an Imax feature that is dazzling yet superfluous. Stunning shots of natural serenity, from Utah's Bryce Canyon National Park to enormous Buddhist statues in the jungles of Thailand, are contrasted with sped-up scenes of urban bustle at airports and malls. Hmmm, sunsets over the desert vs. rush-hour traffic jams - kind of stacking the deck, don't you think?
NEWS
July 6, 2003 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It took a while to catch on to what his friend Lawrence Shaner really saw when he looked at the site of the old Spring City Stove Foundry, William C. Brunner recalled recently, as he reminisced over a photograph of Shaner taken in front of the big brick pattern house. Shaner had called Brunner that day in 1992. He told Brunner that they had to get down to the building, which once housed patterns for casting, and take a picture. "I didn't understand what all the excitement was about," Brunner said.
NEWS
June 29, 2003 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It took a while to catch on to what his friend Lawrence Shaner really saw when he looked at the site of the old Spring City Stove Foundry, William Brunner recalled recently, as he reminisced over a photograph of Shaner taken in front of the big brick pattern house. Shaner had called Brunner that day in 1992. He told Brunner that they had to get down to the building, which once housed patterns for casting, and take a picture. "I didn't understand what all the excitement was about," Brunner said.
NEWS
February 12, 2003 | By Leslie A. Pappas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Pennsburg, Montgomery County, nostalgia costs 50 cents. Stacked neatly on three racks inside Heimbach Bros. Do-It-Yourself Center on Main Street, it comes in postcards of the Shady Nook, Knight's Covered Bridge, the Teen-Canteen: places that disappeared years ago but live still in the minds of local residents. "They cover the full gamut of history very well, from old buildings to industries to the churches," said local historian Vic Stahl, 91. "I think that's the prime purpose behind it. To keep those things alive.
NEWS
April 11, 2002 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Picture postcards of places in Bucks County that still exist or have long vanished will be on display Saturday through Nov. 30 at the Mercer Museum, Pine and Ashland Streets, Doylestown. "Greetings From Bucks County" includes postcards that date from 1900 to 1960. It also examines the origins and art of the postcard. An opening celebration will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, when visitors can bring old postcards for appraisal, make a novelty postcard, hear a talk about themes in postcard collecting, and see and discuss early views of Yardley.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|