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Posters

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NEWS
October 28, 2003
Please continue including the Eagles cheerleader posters in the Daily News. It is truly a wonderful feature. Larry D. Mast Leola, Pa.
NEWS
May 10, 1987 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Moreland's primary election candidates and their supporters took their campaigns to the streets last Sunday, tacking up political posters on the poles and lawns of Ward 4. The red, white and blue posters urged voters to re-elect a Republican commissioner, Michael J. Weinrich, and the black and white posters introduced Dick Booth, who has been endorsed by the Republican Party. The effect was short-lived. By Monday morning, large numbers of the posters had been torn down.
NEWS
November 18, 2003
Iwant to thank Gary Barbera for the early Christmas present he gave us by having the Daily News print a large poster-size photo of that gorgeous Eagles cheerleader in the paper of Oct. 30 for the readers. I can't buy a car from you, Gary, but I love your advertising. Can't wait for the rest! Ed Galing Hatboro
BUSINESS
December 13, 1999 | By Ambre S. Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A year after closing his trendy Walnut Street toy store, Einstein Presents, Wilbur Pierce is running a new company that started with a fairly simple idea: making posters from the art on his walls. Pierce, an avid collector of rare art and posters, said the walls at Einstein Presents often garnered more attention than his toys. "For years people would come in and offer to buy art from me," he said. When the toy business did not prove profitable after 16 years, he finally gave in. Pierce is now chief executive officer of Buyenlarge.
NEWS
October 19, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
A variety of sales in the next week will offer auction-goers a chance to bid on objects tied to entertainment and recreation. On Wednesday, the silver screen will be the inspiration for bidding at Freeman's, which will offer more than 160 lots of movie posters at an 11 a.m. sale at 1808 Chestnut St. Unfortunately for the serious collector, many of the posters, particularly those bundled up in multi-poster lots, were trimmed, thus leaving issue...
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Back in the '60s, posters were trumpeted as art for the masses, a mass- produced affordable alternative to the paintings that only the elite could buy. But hang on to the right one for a few years and even a poster can sell for a four-figure price. That, at least, is likely to happen this month when Freeman/Fine Arts of Philadelphia Inc. offers a color French advertisement for a brand of absinthe at one of its periodic print sales. The framed 48-by-35 1/2-inch lithograph is likely to sell for $1,000 to $1,500.
LIVING
February 17, 2006 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
The Winter Games in Turin are well under way, but some collectors are focusing on classic posters from the snowy fields of earlier Olympics - a time when skis were long and ice skaters wore more clothes. Vintage-poster connoisseurship presents some thorny problems. These days, colorful posters with interesting graphics are considered perfect for interiors, with countless framed reproductions of old travel and food designs available at decor stores. But in pretelevision days, posters were just outdoor advertisements, designed to last a few months, until a specific event or season was over.
NEWS
March 15, 2006 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There it was, an oasis in the desert. When She's Gotta Have It, Spike Lee's feature debut, burst onto the scene in 1986, it represented a bright, juicy mango amid the dull-as-cactus films of the day - those bang-bang male-bonding vehicles starring Eddie Murphy and Richard Pryor. She's Gotta Have It was a romantic comedy that promised something entirely different from 48 Hrs. and Stir Crazy, and its poster said as much, with a quartet of young, hip and beautiful black faces, the block letters of the title seemingly bouncing to their own beat, the colors as vibrant as kente cloth.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Kurt Heine contributed to this report
"Wanted" posters for two physicians who perform abortions have been pinned to windshields of suburban cars recently, alarming and angering abortion-rights activists. Similar posters were being distributed in Pensacola, Fla., before a physician there, Dr. David Gunn, was slain in March by an anti-abortion extremist. "This is not a game. This sort of thing is dangerous," said Joan Coombs, who heads Planned Parenthood. "When you start doing 'Wanted' posters, that's really psychological warfare.
NEWS
June 8, 1991 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Castrucci and the members of Bullet, a Lower East Side artists' collaborative he co-founded six years ago, believe in "art as a means of resistance. " The phrase is underlined in the foreword to Bullet's Your House Is Mine, a bound-in-lead book (weighing in at 18 pounds, 7 ounces) of silk-screen street posters that also line of the walls of an exhibit at the Print Club through June 22. Resistance to what? One of the posters is titled Democracy at Work. On it, New York artist David Wojnarowicz ticks off the things Bullet is against.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
There's no shortage of Latino music in Philadelphia. From the Kimmel to the Painted Bride, the sounds of Puerto Rico, Brazil, and Cuba - traditional or jazz, plus electronic, rap/hip-hop, and pop/rock variations - ring out. So where is the music of Mexico? According to the 2010 U.S. census, Philadelphia's Mexican population increased from 6,220 to 15,531 during the previous decade, with a majority of immigrants moving into South Philly's Italian Market area. "Mexican business owners helped revitalize the Market," says Emilio Mignucci, co-owner of 75-year-old DiBruno Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
THANKS TO best-selling books and TV documentaries, as well as the personal recollections of millions of baby boomers, the 1960s have been forever cemented in our collective consciousness. But out in West Chester, those epochal times are being celebrated in a way that not only pays homage to unforgettable, society-altering movements and events, but also to an unforgettable local broadcaster. Through Aug. 29, the Chester County Historical Society is hosting "The 1960s Pop Culture: Movies, Memorabilia and the Media," a fascinating exhibition that looks at the decade through the film and TV memorabilia amassed by the late Steve Friedman, a longtime Chester County resident known to his fans as "Mr. Movie.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
GREGG GILLIS, the mix-mashing male artist ironically known as Girl Talk, is usually pegged as a major player in the "EDM" (electronic dance music) camp. "But I've always felt as connected with rock, pop and hip-hop as with electronic, never wanted to pick a side," Gillis shared the other day from home base in Pittsburgh. "And I'm much happier playing at diversified festivals like Made in America than at a straight up EDM festival where people come for the atmosphere and the party and it's easy [for an artist]
NEWS
August 12, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRISTOL, Conn. - There is, most definitely, crying in baseball. As the players filed past one another for the post-game handshake, both the winners and the losers shed tears. And because many members of the victorious Taney Dragons and their opponents from Delaware had become close friends over the last 10 days, they hugged with surprising affection. But there was no question that the 8-0 win, which will take the Philadelphia upstart team to the Little League World Series, was overwhelmingly, deliriously sweet for the Taney kids, many of whom had been playing ball together since they were 5 or 6 years old. While the final out flashed on the scoreboard, they toppled over one another in a tangled heap on the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Just before Temple's Class of 2014 walked across the Liacouras Center stage Thursday morning, Betsy Manning shot stills of their shoes for Twitter, Flickr, and posterity. No pump - or toe - was turned away, because Manning's work has little to do with surnames Blahnik or Louboutin and everything to do with documenting the seniors' final show of self-expression as college students. "In the last five years, shoes worn at graduation have gotten so much more radical," said Manning, who has worked as the Temple University photographer for 10 years.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA It has been used with great effect to challenge those in power and bring about social change, to further the civil rights movement, to end apartheid in South Africa, and to advance the cause of the United Farm Workers in California's San Joaquin Valley. An exhibit opening Wednesday at the offices of the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) titled "Boycott! The Art of Economic Activism" illustrates the power of boycotts in bringing about change around the world over the last 50 years.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the weekend, they put up posters in Audubon, Collingswood, Haddon Heights, and Mount Ephraim. And on Monday, they were busy in Oaklyn, Haddon Township, Bellmawr, and Runnemede. Pastor Randy Van Osten and members of his youth group at Oaklyn Baptist Church have joined scores of volunteers across the state who have placed tens of thousands of signs in businesses over the last two weeks to alert the public to human trafficking. Now, their work is bearing fruit. Tips have poured into the help hotline - 855-END-NJ-HT - as state law enforcement officials prepare for the expected trafficking increase ahead of the Feb. 2 Super Bowl at the Meadowlands.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
A BILL PROMISING to bring millions of dollars in advertising revenue to the school district made strides yesterday when it cleared its first hurdle in City Council. Introduced by Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, the Philadelphia Advertising on School Property bill would allow for placement of commercial advertisements on school district buildings as a means of generating funds for the district. "In [Los Angeles], Nike picked up the tab for a [sports] field. That's huge," said Brown.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
As workers in Washington were removing scaffolding from the $120 million Martin Luther King Jr. statue on Saturday, Camilo José Vergara stood on a rickety ladder in Camden, taping images of King to the windows of an abandoned diner. From each poster, a mural of King painted mostly by amateur artists in some of the nation's poorest cities looked out at a desolate strip of Mount Ephraim Avenue in Camden near West Collingswood. "It seems this fits King, the King I imagine," said Vergara, a photographer whose photos of these murals commemorate the 50th anniversary of the civil rights leader's march, set for Washington later this month.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Kirsten Grieshaber, Associated Press
BERLIN - The Simon Wiesenthal Center launched a poster campaign in several German cities Tuesday appealing for help in tracking down the last surviving Nazi war criminals not yet brought to justice, and promising compensation to those who provide useful information. About 2,000 posters depicting the entrance gate of the Nazi death camp Auschwitz were put up in Berlin, Hamburg, and Cologne asking the public to come forward with information that may lead to the arrest of Nazis some seven decades after the end of Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.
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