FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
January 25, 1995 | by Nancy Byal, Special to the Daily News
Q: What's the best dietary change a person can make to reduce blood pressure? A: If you are more than 10 percent above your ideal body weight, cut calories to lose weight and keep the weight off. Overweight people are two to six times more likely to develop hypertension. When overweight adults lose weight, there is a notable reduction in the incidence of hypertension. Q: I'm confused about sodium's effect on blood pressure. Is salt such a bad thing? A: Cumulative research indicates that reducing sodium intake can prevent hypertension from developing.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | By Edward Colimore and Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writers
Dr. Anthony R. Paul, the Philadelphia cancer specialist who killed his family and himself last week with intravenous drugs, used a synthetic narcotic to sedate his wife and children and gave them potassium to induce heart failure, sources in the Police Department and the criminal justice system said yesterday. Potassium and Demerol, the narcotic, were found in the bodies of Paul's wife, Malanie, 47; their daughter, Medhini, 17, and their son, Anthony Rejiva, 12, the sources said.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | By Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
An overdose of potassium that killed three babies at Albert Einstein Medical Center may also have been given to a fourth infant there, hospital spokeswoman Annemarie Armstrong said yesterday. But the infant, listed as critically ill, survived. "One other critically ill infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit experienced symptoms which may have been due to receiving the incorrectly prepared heparin IV solution which contained potassium," Armstrong said in a statement. "The baby received prompt medical attention and was stabilized within a few minutes with no adverse consequences.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patients with heart failure engage in a delicate balancing act all year round, taking care not to drink too much liquid because the weakened heart muscle cannot cope with excess fluid. But what is a person supposed to do during those blast-furnace days of July and August? Perspiration depletes the body of fluids and electrolytes, such as potassium, that are needed for proper heart function. The patient, who is typically also taking a diuretic to excrete excess fluid, then feels the need to drink more water.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | By Susan FitzGerald, Ralph Cipriano, and Thomas Ferrick Jr. Inquirer Staff Writers Inquirer staff writers Jim Detjen, Larry King and Vanessa Williams contributed to this article
Three infants in the neonatal intensive care unit at Albert Einstein Medical Center were killed by overdoses of potassium that hospital officials said were mistakenly added to intravenous lines feeding the babies. The infants died over an 8 1/2-hour period in the intensive care unit beginning at 10 p.m. June 15. Hospital officials did not release word of the deaths until yesterday, saying they wanted to give the staff and families time to compose themselves without media attention.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Solar panels generate electricity by absorbing sunlight, but that is only half the battle. Once electrons in the panel are energized, they must be channeled in the same direction - a process that typically requires a panel made with layers of two kinds of material. Not in the future, if a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University can help it. In a new study published online by the journal Nature, the scientists reported they had created a new class of ceramic material that could accomplish both tasks cheaply and efficiently.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A diet rich in potassium from fruits and vegetables protects arteries from the ravages of high blood pressure and dramatically lowers the risk of stroke, animal studies show. "You get tremendous protection from strokes by eating more fruits and vegetables," Louis Tobian of the University of Minnesota said yesterday. A single extra helping of fruits or vegetables daily might cut stroke risk by as much as 40 percent over an extended period, Tobian said at the American Heart Association's annual meeting on high blood pressure.
NEWS
July 18, 2011
Study questions theory of diet for poor, supermarket proximity Poor people would have healthier diets if their neighborhoods had more supermarkets and fewer fast-food outlets - or so many community and public health activists argue. But a new analysis led by University of North Carolina researchers suggests this "food environment" theory is too simple. Using data from a heart disease study that followed 5,115 people in four cities for 15 years, the researchers correlated fast-food consumption and diet quality with proximity to fast food, supermarket, and grocery stores.
SPORTS
September 13, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
MICHAEL JORDAN has been fined by the NBA for making comments about the league's ongoing collective bargaining process. NBA spokesman Tim Frank yesterday confirmed the penalty for the Charlotte Bobcats owner, but said the league doesn't comment on the total. ESPN.com reported the fine was $100,000. In an interview last month with Australia's Herald Sun, Jordan said the NBA's current model was "broken" and called for revenue-sharing for small-market teams such as his Bobcats and the Milwaukee Bucks, whom Australian Andrew Bogut plays for. Jordan added that he knows "owners are not going to move off what we feel is very necessary for us to get a deal in place where we can coexist as partners.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
LAWYER SHORTAGE Did you ever think you'd hear anyone complain that there are too few lawyers? Well, although there is no shortage of them in general, there's a distinct shortage of criminal lawyers in particular. Officials say lawyers are fleeing criminal-defense work for more lucrative business, leaving many defendants languishing in jail because they can't find attorneys. Of 725,574 actively practicing U.S. lawyers, it's estimated that fewer than 50,000 are defense lawyers, including public defenders.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patients with heart failure engage in a delicate balancing act all year round, taking care not to drink too much liquid because the weakened heart muscle cannot cope with excess fluid. But what is a person supposed to do during those blast-furnace days of July and August? Perspiration depletes the body of fluids and electrolytes, such as potassium, that are needed for proper heart function. The patient, who is typically also taking a diuretic to excrete excess fluid, then feels the need to drink more water.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Solar panels generate electricity by absorbing sunlight, but that is only half the battle. Once electrons in the panel are energized, they must be channeled in the same direction - a process that typically requires a panel made with layers of two kinds of material. Not in the future, if a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University can help it. In a new study published online by the journal Nature, the scientists reported they had created a new class of ceramic material that could accomplish both tasks cheaply and efficiently.
SPORTS
September 13, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
MICHAEL JORDAN has been fined by the NBA for making comments about the league's ongoing collective bargaining process. NBA spokesman Tim Frank yesterday confirmed the penalty for the Charlotte Bobcats owner, but said the league doesn't comment on the total. ESPN.com reported the fine was $100,000. In an interview last month with Australia's Herald Sun, Jordan said the NBA's current model was "broken" and called for revenue-sharing for small-market teams such as his Bobcats and the Milwaukee Bucks, whom Australian Andrew Bogut plays for. Jordan added that he knows "owners are not going to move off what we feel is very necessary for us to get a deal in place where we can coexist as partners.
NEWS
July 18, 2011
Study questions theory of diet for poor, supermarket proximity Poor people would have healthier diets if their neighborhoods had more supermarkets and fewer fast-food outlets - or so many community and public health activists argue. But a new analysis led by University of North Carolina researchers suggests this "food environment" theory is too simple. Using data from a heart disease study that followed 5,115 people in four cities for 15 years, the researchers correlated fast-food consumption and diet quality with proximity to fast food, supermarket, and grocery stores.
FOOD
January 17, 2008 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
Dried fruit in the pantry is always money in the bank, but the qualities of shriveled apricots, raisins, cherries and their kin seem even more valuable in the winter months. I mean, aside from booze-mummified fruitcake made when the Beatles were on stage. It is now that nuggets of desiccated fruit pop up more frequently in all manner of dishes. They add color and sweetness to desserts, muffins and quick breads. In savory recipes, dried fruit does that and more: It provides depth of flavor by balancing acidity, spiciness and saltiness.
NEWS
July 17, 2002 | By Judy Harch
Talk about a dose of reality. Even though I had heard rumors, the public notice from the state printed in the newspaper last Wednesday was a shocker. Potassium iodide tablets are being offered to residents within 10 miles of the nuclear power stations in Ocean and Salem Counties. As I read the notice, I thought back to that day many years ago when my husband and I took Frank and Sarah Sauers, our friend's elderly parents, on a sightseeing tour of some of the remaining wilderness of South Jersey.
NEWS
July 14, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Worrying about nuclear disaster seemed an unlikely thing to be doing on a sunny summer afternoon in this sleepy farm town. But Joanne Gross, her husband and granddaughter in tow, said she wasn't taking any chances. "We're at war," Gross said grimly, scooping up three tiny, silver-wrapped pills that officials hope will keep her family safer in the event of a nuclear accident or attack. "We have to do everything we can to be safe. " This weekend, New Jersey began the first of six sessions aimed at preparing residents for the worst.
FOOD
August 11, 1996 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
I am tasting salt for the first time. After years of coveting its crystalline crunch on pretzels, its salty flocking on popcorn and chips, I am here with several shakers and I'm tasting the stuff, straight. Kosher salt, iodized salt, free-flowing table salt, purified crystals of sea salt, potassium salt, reduced-sodium salt, pretzel salt, and several varieties of raw sea salt lie on plates across my kitchen counter. Some are as coarse as gravel, while others are powdery fine. They differ in color, moisture content, transparency, flavor, and, most surprisingly, aroma.
NEWS
January 11, 1996 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Army Humvee, the back doors of its camouflage facade swung open to the chill, sat yesterday in the crowded parking lot of the Vivra Renal Care Center of Philadelphia, in West Philadelphia. Inside, where the battle was being fought, National Guardsmen in green Army fatigues carried Emethel Dunbar, 61, on a stretcher and lay her on a reclining chair, next to a lifesaving dialysis machine. She had already missed one of her thrice-weekly sessions because no one could get through the snow piled high in front of her home on Hazel Street, just blocks from the center.
FOOD
January 25, 1995 | by Nancy Byal, Special to the Daily News
Q: What's the best dietary change a person can make to reduce blood pressure? A: If you are more than 10 percent above your ideal body weight, cut calories to lose weight and keep the weight off. Overweight people are two to six times more likely to develop hypertension. When overweight adults lose weight, there is a notable reduction in the incidence of hypertension. Q: I'm confused about sodium's effect on blood pressure. Is salt such a bad thing? A: Cumulative research indicates that reducing sodium intake can prevent hypertension from developing.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|