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Potholes

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NEWS
January 31, 1986
As we enter phase two of the reconstruction of the Schuylkill Expressway, I am concerned about the quality of the repair work. The portion of the Roosevelt Extension just north of the Twin Bridges was rebuilt less than two years ago. It now has a number of potholes, broken segments and worn areas, which are excessive for so recently restored a roadway. I would like to see the road improvements lasting longer than it takes to double the national debt. George Weinbaum Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 14, 2001
Since nothing lives forever, it's safe to say that newspaper series - like everything else - must come to an end. The only possible exception could be Urban Warrior's "Dump of the Day. " Her source material seems inexhaustible. Even if, by some miracle, every trash-strewn eyesore in Philadelphia could disappear overnight, more would spring up by morning, like the proverbial dragon's teeth. Sad to say, there seems no limit to Philadelphians' capacity to foul their own nests.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
Drivers getting crunched by potholes on or near city trolley tracks have complained so loudly and sued so often that Mayor Goode and SEPTA General Manager Louis J. Gambaccini yesterday agreed that it's crunch time for those responsible - themselves. So they and Pennsylvania Department of Transportation district engineer Stephen B. Lester held a press conference to announce that the city and transit and highway authorities each would contribute $250,000 to a fund to fix the car-wrecking holes.
SPORTS
April 25, 1994 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By the time Sydney Maree and Brendan Hilliard turned the corner on West River Drive in yesterday's Penn Relays 20K, they must have thought they were running in the Rocky Horror Road Race. Already they had dodged bicycles and two oversize vans, picked their way down a two-mile stretch of torn-up roadway, sidestepped potholes and large stones, and survived swirling dust. Now, as they made the final turn onto West River Drive, they faced their final fright - March of Dimes walkers.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you are sick of dodging the axle-busting, tire-flattening potholes that seem to be everywhere, get over it - the craters are likely here until late spring, experts say. "We are fighting Mother Nature," said Leslie A. McCarthy, a Villanova University engineering professor whose research includes pavement design and construction. This year, pothole season began early, on Jan. 6, when temperatures in the region went from freezing into the 60s and back into the teens, according to state Department of Transportation spokesman Gene Blaum.
NEWS
February 28, 1987 | By Russell Cooke, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spring may look good from this distance, but Streets Commissioner Harry M. Perks warned yesterday of one reason not to look forward to the warm weather: potholes. "We keep charts on the number of potholes . . . and this is going to be a very, very bad year," Perks told City Council members during a daylong hearing on Streets Department operations. "You're going to be having a lot of phone calls within the next month," he told Councilwoman Ann J. Land. Worse, Perks also disclosed that his department would need six to eight weeks to get around to fixing a pothole reported at this time of year because of the sheer volume of holes and budget constraints.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
If the road to hell is paved with good intentions, the road from the mayor's house to his office sure isn't. It's paved with pool-table-smooth asphalt, in fact. A 20-minute cruise from East Falls to City Hall found Warden Drive, the mayor's street, a little bumpy but with no potholes; Midvale Avenue almost like glass; Kelly Drive with maybe a dozen bumps, mostly manholes and a couple of gullies north and south of Fountain Green Road, and a smooth Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
NEWS
May 5, 1986 | By Russell Cooke and Robin Clark, Inquirer Staff Writers
Margaret Power was walking home from a church bingo game one March evening when she stumbled into a gaping hole while crossing Porter Street in South Philadelphia. Her left kneecap was fractured in the fall. Hospitalized for 13 days in 1982, Power - a mother of nine - recently was awarded $21,500 to settle a lawsuit she filed against the city. Her case, city records show, is just one of dozens of financial settlements paid by the city each year to Philadelphians who stumble into potholes and utility excavations, trip over uneven trolley tracks or plunge into open manholes and defective sewer inlets.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Where Joseph Borucki sees destruction and expense, Scott Kleiger sees liquid gold. Borucki, a Mount Laurel lawyer, just spent $500 to fix a wheel bearing damaged by a pothole. For him, every drive has become a slalom run around road craters. Kleiger, a Harleysville entrepreneur, operates a fleet of specially equipped trucks that fill potholes in seconds, and this is his high season. "It's like our birthday!" Kleiger exulted last week, watching one of his Pothole Killer trucks back up traffic for a half-mile on U.S. 1 in Bucks County as it squirted a warm mix of asphalt and cement into hole after hole.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By John Moritz and Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writers
For Heather Redfern, a trip to the Target store turned out to be far costlier than she planned. On the way home from the store, near the Neshaminy Mall, in Bucks County, she had an unfortunate encounter with that late-winter nemesis - the pothole. "Some of them you hit, and you just cringe and hope nothing bad happened to your car," said Redfern, who works in SEPTA's media-relations department. In this case, hope wasn't enough. Redfern needed a new tire, wheel, and valve stem - for $550.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Leah Kochenour, Inquirer Staff Writer
Summer is coming to a close, but some of the region's road crews might be wondering if last winter is ever going to end. "We're still in the midst of treating roads that suffered extensive damage during the winter," said Eugene Blaum, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. From Dec. 1 through Aug. 14, he said, PennDot used 15,922 tons of patching material on the region's roads - about double what it used during the comparable periods in the previous two years combined.
NEWS
May 28, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many Philadelphians, Paul Pettet spent much of Friday and Saturday, the unofficial first weekend of summer, driving. Except Pettet wasn't headed for the Shore or the Poconos. The 27-year city Streets Department employee was pushing on the gas pedal with his salt-stained work boots, guiding a six-wheel patcher truck down East Luzerne Street in the Juniata Park section, patching up the wounds of a brutal winter: the potholes. Philadelphia's second-snowiest winter on record (68 inches of snowfall)
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Readers' communications come in a mixed mailbag. Most ask questions. Others offer opinions. Some of the letters are complimentary, others not so much. I took a particular pounding for this opening paragraph of a recent column: "There was a time when the full-size pickup truck was largely blue-collar transit with a blue-collar price tag. As it turns out, that nostalgic note has gone the way of whitewalls, wire wheel hubcaps, and moderate Republicans. " I thought the reference to "moderate Republicans" was at once innocuous and factual, since the rise of the tea parties has left a number of moderate Republican lawmakers by the wayside.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
ONLY ABOUT once every 30 years does Philadelphia see the kind of winter just past, with 19 separate snowfalls and extreme temperature fluctuations. And that's why the city is on track to fill the most potholes in its history, city officials say. Readers may have noticed the "Crater Philly" graphic that ran in the Daily News for weeks, with many writing in to share their tumultuous tales of breaks in the blacktop, with their cars taking the beating. Typical is this plea from Stacey Scanlan: "Please urgently fix the potholes on City Ave. from just before [St. Joseph's]
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you are sick of dodging the axle-busting, tire-flattening potholes that seem to be everywhere, get over it - the craters are likely here until late spring, experts say. "We are fighting Mother Nature," said Leslie A. McCarthy, a Villanova University engineering professor whose research includes pavement design and construction. This year, pothole season began early, on Jan. 6, when temperatures in the region went from freezing into the 60s and back into the teens, according to state Department of Transportation spokesman Gene Blaum.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Where Joseph Borucki sees destruction and expense, Scott Kleiger sees liquid gold. Borucki, a Mount Laurel lawyer, just spent $500 to fix a wheel bearing damaged by a pothole. For him, every drive has become a slalom run around road craters. Kleiger, a Harleysville entrepreneur, operates a fleet of specially equipped trucks that fill potholes in seconds, and this is his high season. "It's like our birthday!" Kleiger exulted last week, watching one of his Pothole Killer trucks back up traffic for a half-mile on U.S. 1 in Bucks County as it squirted a warm mix of asphalt and cement into hole after hole.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bucks County lawyer Niels Eriksen blew two tires in potholes Wednesday. The first was en route to a district court in Bristol to defend a man in an assault case. He called the judge from a nearby bar to say he was going to be late. "Isn't it a little early for that?" the judge joked. Two hours later, the temporary spare on Eriksen's Acura was shredded on the Route 1 Superhighway, effectively canceling an appointment with a client at Bucks County Prison. "I paid $250," Eriksen said of two new tires and installation.
NEWS
January 11, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what has proved to be an unusual winter, drivers already have endured snow, rain, ice, and a weather whiplash that have contributed to an earlier-than-expected nuisance: A surge of potholes. "The potholes are jumping up like crazy," Erich Wendel, public works director in Middletown Township, Bucks County, said Thursday. "We have a lot of guys now patching up. " "This pothole season is incredibly early, and it is due to the wide fluctuation in temperatures we're having," Philadelphia Streets Commissioner David Perri said Thursday.
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