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Potpourri

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FOOD
July 21, 1993 | by Anne B. Adams and Nancy Nash-Cummings, Special to the Daily News
Dear Anne and Nan: Potpourri had been placed in a large wooden salad bowl before I purchased it. Dye from the potpourri stained the bowl, and the fragrance still lingers. Any suggestions to help remove either the fragrance or stain will sure be appreciated. - Kay Sanding the bowl might help. If the oil in the potpourri has penetrated the wood, it's going to be hard to get rid of the fragrance. A friend who knows a lot about dried flowers suggested a couple of things. She thought you might try steaming the bowl to force the oil through it or soak it with a solution of baking soda and water.
NEWS
August 3, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / KENDALL WILKINSON
The annual Garden State extravaganza of rides, displays and entertainment is under way at Garden State Park in Cherry Hill through next Sunday. Singers Nicolette Larson and Kris Kristofferson are on the bill today, along with enough things to see and do to tire out even the most energetic child. Among the options is this Ferris wheel, from the top of which one can see the clubhouse (left) and the potpourri of activities below.
NEWS
October 6, 1999
The tendency to view things in black or white, to think in opposing categories, is setting back our deliberations on diversity and multiculturalism, as it often does in other areas. Actually, we have, to some extent, and can further develop, a societal conception that allows ample room for diversity without sacrificing unity. An Image may help: Instead of thinking of a melting pot ( in which all differences are melted down to one homogenous potpourri) or rainbow (in which different colors lie next to one another, like many tribes stretching over a landscape)
NEWS
July 2, 2002 | By Crispin Sartwell
Civilization depends on, or simply is, appearance. It's the slight lie, the thin veneer, the cosmetics, the corporate uniform, the etiquette that covers up the hairy mammal each of us is. This is a good thing, within certain limits. I don't necessarily want to follow you into the bathroom or bedroom to witness the full truth of your mammalian being. But it's possible to take the thing too far, to lose the truth completely. Martha Stewart is a symbol of civilization. She's the empress of appearances.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | Mark Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
LET THEM EAT CAKE End-of-summer houseguests take note: Bring food. So says Helen Sloane Dudman, former executive woman's editor of the Washington Post. In the Bangor (Maine) Daily News, she writes: "Please don't bring a trivet or a windsock or napkin rings or potpourri. . . . What we can use is something to eat. With guests scheduled for just about every weekend in a house we've tried to keep simple, we can always use something for the pantry or the freezer. " DECAL DANGERS Parents, beware: Delta Enterprise Corp.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Felicity and taste were characteristics of the Concerto Soloists Chamber Orchestra's playing on Monday night, during its final season appearance at the Walnut Street Theater. Kurt Redel made a return visit as guest conductor. The music was the usual potpourri - Georg Philipp Telemann, Carl Stamitz, Marin Marais, Alexander Tcherepnin and Dvorak - a pileup of facile, brief selections that did not quite seem worthy of this conductor's efforts. Redel, who is also a flutist, has led many major-league orchestras abroad; he is the founder and director of the PRO-ARTE Orchestra of Munich.
NEWS
January 19, 1987
I've been watching the Mummers Parade - sometimes from the curb but most times from my easy chair - for nearly 40 years now. When I decide on being there I try to get as close to Snyder Avenue as possible. Legend has it - and I vouch for it - that the string bands sound best there because cold has not yet affected the strings. The Mummers Parade was born and bred in South Philadelphia. It is the child of the rich ethnic potpourri that has existed there. A New Year's celebration of, by and for the folks of Philly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
Another full weekend is in store for regular shoppers at the 4th Mellon Jazz Festival. The attractions range from Saturday night's summit, featuring the Miles Davis group and the Benny Golson Quartet, to a David Chertok film potpourri, to Sunday's final wrap-up package of poet-playwright Ntozake Shange, woodwind player John Purcell and blues guitarist Jean-Paul Bourelly. The free alfresco offerings of this afternoon include the Edgar Bateman Ensemble at JFK Plaza, the group Catch 22 at Commerce Square and the solo piano of Mark Randall at Mellon Independence Center.
SPORTS
May 23, 2010 | By Stephen A. Smith, Inquirer Columnist
The year was 2001, months before the 76ers would galvanize a city with a rare combination of heart and tenacity, propelling the team to heights unseen since its halcyon days nearly two decades earlier. Inside Gustine Lake, a dilapidated gymnasium, never to be associated with affluence, was a potpourri of Philadelphia stars in attendance looking to hone its skills, determined to make itself better - and leaning on John Hardnett, who left us last week. Aaron McKie was there one minute.
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | By Eric L. Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Russians descended on Cinnaminson last week, but they had food on their minds, not politics. Chefs Victor Ledovsky and Konstantin Gaivoronsky and translator Alexander Ptitsyn toured Cinnaminson High School on Wednesday as part of a culinary exchange program aimed at taking some of America's dishes overseas. "The main goal of our visit is to get acquainted with the American food industry," said Ledovsky, director of the Pyatigorsk Polytechnical Institute. "We've seen a lot of interesting things, like the wide variety of foods and the different technology used for cooking and preparing these foods.
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SPORTS
May 23, 2010 | By Stephen A. Smith, Inquirer Columnist
The year was 2001, months before the 76ers would galvanize a city with a rare combination of heart and tenacity, propelling the team to heights unseen since its halcyon days nearly two decades earlier. Inside Gustine Lake, a dilapidated gymnasium, never to be associated with affluence, was a potpourri of Philadelphia stars in attendance looking to hone its skills, determined to make itself better - and leaning on John Hardnett, who left us last week. Aaron McKie was there one minute.
NEWS
February 26, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shock and weather, sore throats and Disney-love, freeze-dried roses and a hot-air balloon in six neat pieces. This is the 2010 Philadelphia International Flower Show? You betcha. Center City's MODA botanica, which calls itself "an art-driven floral studio," caused a stir at the 2009 flower show with an imaginative interpretation of the traditional garden allée, terrace, and waterfall. "People either loved it or hated it," says Armas Koehler, one of the two-year-old firm's three founders.
LIVING
April 11, 2008 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
Between them, the Philadelphia Antiques Show and the Original 23d Street Armory Antiques Show will offer two interesting exhibitions, 93 excellent dealers, and myriad opportunities to become better acquainted with fine old things. The buying and selling begins today and runs through Sunday at the Armory Show. The Philadelphia Antiques Show opens to the public tomorrow and runs through Tuesday at a new location, the Philadelphia Cruise Terminal at Pier One at the Navy Yard. Closely tied to the Philadelphia Antiques Show's new venue is its 2008 loan exhibit, "Fore & Aft - Philadelphia Collects Maritime," which celebrates the city's seagoing past.
NEWS
November 7, 2004 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Say the word horse in Franklin Township, and Police Chief Michael DiGiorgio groans. DiGiorgio's officers have spent so much time keeping the peace on a local horse farm at the center of a nasty - sometimes violent - dispute that a joke making the rounds in town suggests that the police open a satellite station on the property. "It's a very volatile situation," DiGiorgio said in a recent interview. People connected to the Gloucester County farm have called police 81 times since the start of a continuing animal-cruelty case 13 months ago, police dispatch records show.
NEWS
July 2, 2002 | By Crispin Sartwell
Civilization depends on, or simply is, appearance. It's the slight lie, the thin veneer, the cosmetics, the corporate uniform, the etiquette that covers up the hairy mammal each of us is. This is a good thing, within certain limits. I don't necessarily want to follow you into the bathroom or bedroom to witness the full truth of your mammalian being. But it's possible to take the thing too far, to lose the truth completely. Martha Stewart is a symbol of civilization. She's the empress of appearances.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2001 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andre Englehart is a professional inline skater. The 20-year-old from Lansdale, Montgomery County, says he is also a "huge Flyers fan. " Today, his two loves merge at the First Union Center, when Englehart will compete in the seventh annual ESPN X Games. When he performs aerial tricks off a vert ramp under the Flyers' championship banners, "it's going to be one of the biggest moments of my life," he said. Starting today, the X Games will switch from outdoor locales around Philadelphia to the First Union Center for a final six-day run. And Philadelphia will finally get some of that big media exposure the city is banking on when ABC, which, along with ESPN, is owned by the Walt Disney Co., begins televising selected events Saturday and Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2001 | by Al Hunter Jr. Daily News Staff Writer
The 11th annual Berks Jazz Fest kicks off this weekend with its usual blend -heavy on the "smooth jazz" with a dash of straight-ahead, blues and R&B. But it's a mixture that works - and infuses $2 million into the Berks County area. "We really strive to have a balance," said John Ernesto, the festival's general manager for seven years. "We have a great affiliation with WJJZ," Philadelphia's "smooth jazz" radio station. "Fans of contemporary music come out. They come out to the shows.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | By Trish Boppert
What if they gave a demonstration against police brutality - among scores of other social injustices - and a brutal beating not only didn't erupt but cops smilingly strolled alongside demonstrators holding "Free Mumia" signs? That was pretty much the scene on the Ben Franklin Parkway at Sunday's Unity 2000 protest-a-rama. Cops, protesters and observers mingled under a blistering sun that soon had demonstrators doffing their costumes and giant papier-mache heads while lines formed at the decidedly capitalistic cheesesteak and beverage stands.
NEWS
October 6, 1999
The tendency to view things in black or white, to think in opposing categories, is setting back our deliberations on diversity and multiculturalism, as it often does in other areas. Actually, we have, to some extent, and can further develop, a societal conception that allows ample room for diversity without sacrificing unity. An Image may help: Instead of thinking of a melting pot ( in which all differences are melted down to one homogenous potpourri) or rainbow (in which different colors lie next to one another, like many tribes stretching over a landscape)
LIVING
June 8, 1997 | By Michael Harrington, FOR THE INQUIRER
For readers, summertime is book time. More precisely, paperback time. It's tough enough getting a beach towel and sunscreen in that bag. Who wants a big, heavy, expensive hardback stuffed in the beach bag (or the backpack, if the mountains are your destination)? But what to read among this season's paperbacks? Here are a few suggestions. Just don't get so absorbed that you forget to slather on the sun protection or the bug repellant. The most gripping read of the summer may be Matthew F. Jones' rural-noir novel A Single Shot (Delta, $11.95)
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