CollectionsPottery
IN THE NEWS

Pottery

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
The Abington Art Center exhibited and sold students' works of pottery Sunday. A huge array of all types of ceramic works by students were sold at the sixth annual sale and holiday arts and crafts exhibit.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Back in 1959, auctioneer Ronald Pook would have us know, a certain Omer Tobias, anticipating trouble with the law, decided it was time for a quick relocation to Canada. One of the few possessions that Tobias, a collector among other occupations, took with him were two dozen of his finest pieces of Gaudy Dutch pottery. Getting near the border, according to Pook, Tobias had a change of heart, left his Gaudy Dutch in a New England antique shop and returned to New York to face the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1990 | By Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
As a 17-year-old growing up in Brooklyn, the closest Jerry Brody had been to the Southwest was watching a John Wayne movie at his neighborhood theater. But all that changed in 1947 at one of his regular haunts, the Brooklyn Museum, when he saw the Native American-style rock art of Agnes Sims. "I had no idea what the Southwest was," Brody recalled, "But those rubbings were like a magnet that caused me to do things and study in a way I never would have. I never forgot it. " Today, archaeologists regard Brody, now professor emeritus at the University of New Mexico, as the foremost authority on Pueblo Indian pottery from the Four Corners area of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1986 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
Could you identify a stoneware pitcher for us and tell us what it may be worth? There are no manufacturer's marks. It is 12 inches high and 7 inches in diameter at its widest part. There are three classical-style figures appliqued on it in blue. I showed your photographs to half a dozen dealers in stoneware, some of whom thought your jug was German. But I had a feeling that it was American and sent the photograph to New York dealer Gary Stradling. He identified it as a piece from Noah White's Utica pottery and estimated it was worth $200 to $300.
NEWS
November 15, 1998 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The clear-cut shapes of David MacDonald's pottery, its surfaces covered with direct linear patterns impressed into wet clay with a wooden comb, are a major recurrent motif of his recent work, on view at Swarthmore College. The widely exhibited, longtime Syracuse University ceramics teacher is profoundly influenced by his African American roots. MacDonald has made his reputation with functional, earth-toned covered casseroles, teapots and platters that use decoration to define their form.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Piers Wedgwood, 59, of Chestnut Hill, a British lord and a fifth-generation great-grandson of Josiah Wedgwood, creator of the distinctive blue-and-white pottery that embellishes tea tables and china collections, died Wednesday, Jan. 29, of cardiac failure at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Lord Wedgwood devoted his life to keeping alive regard for his family's ceramic and decorative arts. During a career spanning four decades, he traveled thousands of miles as Josiah Wedgwood & Sons' international ambassador.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by David M Warren
Fourth grader Cody Stevens' discovery of pottery fragments at Haddonfield's Tatem Elementary School led to a visit yesterday from a woman who recalled the pottery factory that used to be on the property. Louisa Endlien Talley, 88, also spoke about her childhood in the borough.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | By Ralph and Terry Kovel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Gouda art pottery is the name given by collectors to art-nouveau and art- deco pottery made in various shops near Gouda, Arnhem and other towns in the Netherlands and Belgium. The distinctive designs and colors used by potters in the area attracted buyers from all parts of the world. The pieces are usually marked with factory names: Zuid Holland, Goedewaagen, Schoonhoven, Regina or Platteelbakkery. "Zuid" also means south, and it refers to the province where the town of Gouda is located.
NEWS
February 21, 1988 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
Fifty people stood in line on a recent Saturday waiting for the doors to open for the advertised sale of 190 pieces of 18th-century English pottery at a New York antiques gallery. Clearly, the exhibition and sale of the Kanter collection, which began Jan. 23 and ran for five days, was a big event for those interested in this rarefied corner of the antiques market. The tea wares, chocolate pots, figures of animals and other rarities were priced from $575 for a teacup (without its saucer)
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | By Karen McAllister, Special to The Inquirer
When the Phoenix Iron Co. built three kilns next to its factory in Phoenixville in 1869, its goal was to make fire-brick for its iron furnaces. In one of the kilns, the brick was produced, and in the other two, workers made various kinds of pottery. Some were terra cotta wall ornaments shaped like the heads of boars, stags or dogs. Ruth Irwin Weidner, an art history professor at West Chester University, said it was common during the time for brick-making operations, such as Phoenixville's, to run a second business making and selling pottery.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's special about Timbuctoo can't be readily seen. The value of this nearly 200-year-old historic village of former slaves and free African Americans in Westampton Township, Burlington County, lies below the surface. Artifacts of the lives of the people who lived there are buried under decades of dirt. In a cemetery, the bones of soldiers from the Civil War-era Sixth Regiment U.S. Colored Troops also lay in the ground, undisturbed by progress and nearby suburban sprawl. On Saturday, about 100 people flocked to this stretch of trees and meadow, fully aware that what lay beneath their feet made the soil sacred and the day special.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
Buried in the soil outside the Indian King Tavern museum in Haddonfield are remains from more than a century ago. Among things retrieved so far: broken pieces of glass goblets and pottery and an old coin drilled through the middle, all discarded there in the underbelly of a long-gone addition to the building. Those shards of history, inside buried brick walls, lay untouched until last month, when an excavation crew of high school students and other local volunteers as well as professional archaeologists began work on the site.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Piers Wedgwood, 59, of Chestnut Hill, a British lord and a fifth-generation great-grandson of Josiah Wedgwood, creator of the distinctive blue-and-white pottery that embellishes tea tables and china collections, died Wednesday, Jan. 29, of cardiac failure at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Lord Wedgwood devoted his life to keeping alive regard for his family's ceramic and decorative arts. During a career spanning four decades, he traveled thousands of miles as Josiah Wedgwood & Sons' international ambassador.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Piers Wedgwood, 59, of Chestnut Hill, a British lord and fifth-generation great-grandson of Josiah Wedgwood, creator of the distinctive blue and white pottery that embellishes tea tables and china collections, died Wednesday, Jan. 29, of cardiac failure at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Lord Wedgwood devoted his life to keeping alive regard for his family's ceramic and decorative arts. During a career spanning four decades, he traveled thousands of miles as Wedgwood's international ambassador.
NEWS
December 10, 2013 | BY SALENA ZITO
  CHESTER, W.Va.- When the family of seven sitting near the front of Connie's Corner restaurant discreetly held hands and bowed their heads in prayer before their meal, no one in the bustling diner seemed surprised. At the same moment, 400 miles east, at Sotheby's auction house in New York City, "Saying Grace" sold for $46 million. The painting by Norman Rockwell vividly depicts a crowded restaurant (not so unlike Connie's Corner) where a grandmother and her grandson pray at a table as truck drivers watch.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 7,000 years ago, in what is now northern Poland, a hardy band of farmers came up with a clever way to preserve the milk from their cows. They poured it into special pottery vessels with holes in the bottom, thereby separating the solids from the precious fluid to make cheese. That is the conclusion of a study published Thursday in the journal Nature based on a chemical analysis of the pottery - the earliest hard evidence for cheese-making by ancient humans. The seeds for the discovery were planted decades ago with a string of chance encounters that began with the travels of a young Polish American college student from Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 7,000 years ago, in what is now northern Poland, a hardy band of farmers came up with a clever way to preserve the milk from their cows. They poured it into special pottery vessels with holes in the bottom, thereby separating the solids from the precious fluid to make cheese. That is the conclusion announced by a team of scientists today in the journal Nature, based on chemical analysis of the pottery - the first hard evidence for cheese-making by prehistoric humans.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Pook & Pook's single-owner sale this weekend of items from Rita and Paul Flack's collection of Pennsylvania American art and antiques will emphasize their interest in the field's scope, not just monetary value. To be sure, among the more than 400 lots to be offered - including decorated slip pottery, Fraktur drawings, folk art, furniture, and quilts - at least a dozen are expected to bring five-figure prices. The sale begins at 10 a.m. Saturday at the gallery at 463 E. Lancaster Ave., Downingtown.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After he retired, Walter R. Myers turned to pottery, religious pottery. With the help of clergy at St. Martin-in-the-Fields parish in Chestnut Hill, Mr. Myers began turning out Communion plates and chalices for Episcopal congregations throughout the United States and in England and Guatemala. "He was a very religious man, a very artistic man," his son Christopher said in an interview. Mr. Myers, 85, a former prep school and college administrator, died of heart failure Tuesday, May 29, at his home in Chestnut Hill.
NEWS
June 2, 2012 | By David Iams and FOR THE INQUIRER
David Rago characterizes his two-day sale on June 16 and 17 of early contemporary, modern, and 21st-century design and contemporary pottery as not being "super exclusive" — unlike certain (ahem) New York auction houses, he explained last week, that sometimes limit sales to a hundred or so costly items. Not only will the three sessions at the Rago Arts and Auction Center in Lambertville offer a total of 1,100 lots, with most expected to sell for three- to high-four-figure prices, Rago is also showcasing them to potential new auction-goers with a special exhibition this weekend in town, at a condominium at 10 Rittenhouse Square.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|