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FOOD
August 2, 1989 | The Inquirer staff
A coalition of consumer advocates, farmers and poultry-plant workers has released a report criticizing the poultry-inspection procedures of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) as well as the business practices of large U.S. poultry producers. USDA inspectors each week approve 40 million chickens infested with salmonella bacteria, according to the report, released last week by the North Carolina-based Institute for Southern Studies. The institute is a nonprofit group supported by public donations.
FOOD
July 5, 1987 | The Inquirer staff
The weeks-old controversy over the wholesomeness of American poultry heightened in the days leading up to this holiday weekend, with a consumer group urging people to boycott chicken when planning their cookouts and the country's poultry producers fighting back. "American chicken lovers can enjoy their Independence Day cookouts with the assurance that the chicken they eat is nutritious and safe when cooked and handled properly," said George B. Watts, president of the National Broiler Council.
NEWS
October 22, 2002 | By Fred Kleinberg
If you have a weak stomach, you might want to pass on this story. With all the talk about impending war with Iraq, threats of bioterrorism, and potential chemical and nuclear attacks on the United States, the White House and Congress have a lot on their plates. But it's what's on our plates that's giving us the most trouble: bad poultry produced by some of the biggest food processors in the country. Pilgrim's Pride Corp. recalled turkey and chicken products after inspectors found listeria germs at its Wampler Foods plant in Montgomery County.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Robert E. Croshaw, 77, known as "The Egg Man" while delivering fresh eggs, chickens and turkeys to customers' homes for more than half a century, died Saturday at Memorial Hospital of Burlington County, Mount Holly. A Burlington Township resident, Mr. Croshaw's white delivery van was for many years a fixture for customers in Burlington County's riverfront communities as well as in Mount Holly. Although by 1961 he had stopped delivering chickens and turkeys, he continued to deliver eggs to area homes until becoming ill three years ago. "He was like the Pony Express.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By Alison Carper, Special to The Inquirer
Inside a makeshift church in an abandoned shop on a Sunday afternoon, voices singing in French rise to offer thanks for life in a new land of opportunity. Outside is Laurel's two-block, deserted downtown, with several shops vacant. Beyond, in small towns nearby, are the Eastern Shore's numerous poultry-processing plants. The voices belong to Haitians. And for untold numbers, the exodus from their poverty-stricken Caribbean country did not stop in Florida or New York, but here on the Eastern Shore - in the poultry capital of America.
FOOD
November 11, 1987 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
It's time to open the mail bag again. The questions I'm receiving these days have more to do with health, nutrition, food-born illness and food safety than with requests for recipes. So today I would like to discuss one issue about which many readers have questions. I will admit up front that I am neither a food scientist nor a nutritionist, but then neither are a lot of the people passing out "scientific" and "nutritional" information about meat. Most of the recent questions have to do with chicken and salmonella, and most of them are a direct result of the piece that "60 Minutes" did on the subject earlier this year and re-ran recently.
FOOD
October 9, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
What is the life-expectancy of steakhouses in a decade that appears to be saying thumbs-down on red meat? Doctors and health organizations are saying beef is bad for you, especially prime beef, which is loaded with fat. And the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is already forecasting that we're going to eat less red meat in 1989 and that we'll be buying more chicken instead. The bad news for the health groups trying to change eating habits is that the government forecast and the fact that people are eating less red meat appear to have little, if anything, to do with health concerns.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Jill Morrison, Special to The Inquirer
Nicholas Iacorino was one cold turkey Friday afternoon as he puffed away on a cigarette, his back to a biting cold wind and his brown and orange feathers flying. "I'm ready to go south, molt," he said between drags. "Maybe a Bahamas trip. " Iacorino was one of 10 ersatz turkeys and chickens freezing in their feathers at the New Hope & Ivyland Rail Road station to film the first major television commercial for Wampler Longacre Turkey and Chicken, a company with origins in Quakertown and now a subsidiary of WLR Foods Inc. of Hinton, Va. "It's a good, healthy day's work," said fellow turkey John Sloman.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | By Malcolm Garcia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Last year, David Fitzpatrick drove through Rockledge looking at houses for sale. He turned down Burke Street and was impressed by the quiet, tree-lined neighborhood near Huntingdon Pike. Children played in their yards and raced their bicycles past parked cars. But what really caught his eye were the four chickens pecking at the pebbled ground outside one home. "We thought it was nice," Fitzpatrick recalled yesterday. "Kind of countrylike. You don't see that in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 29, 1998 | By Mary Otto, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Spring has returned to the green depths of Delaware's largest forest, and so have the birds. They are up from Central America, places such as the Maya Forest of Guatemala and the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Around the forest, the rural landscape and small towns are also being transformed, by people who have likewise come from Central America. Asylum-seekers from war-torn Guatemala and migrant farmers from Mexico are being drawn to Delaware, to jobs making $6 or more an hour in the area's booming poultry plants.
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NEWS
November 27, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Based on its propensity to steal other birds' fish, Ben Franklin once judged the eagle "a rank coward" and "a bird of bad moral character. " He was therefore pleased that one official rendition of the national symbol looked more like a turkey, "a bird of courage" that, according to Franklin, "would not hesitate to attack a grenadier of the British guards who should presume to invade his farm yard with a red coat on. " While Thanksgiving as a national festival...
NEWS
October 19, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A central Pennsylvania chicken factory accused this week of treating newborn chicks cruelly has denied the allegations made by an animal-rights organization. "Over my 40 years as a chicken farmer, I always strive to be the leading advocate of humane treatment for all animals," Scott Sechler, owner of Lebanon County-based Bell & Evans, wrote in a letter on the firm's website. "We've never strayed from humane animal best practices. " Compassion Over Killing, a Washington-based nonprofit that says its mission is preventing animal cruelty and promoting vegetarianism, released a video this week recorded by an undercover investigator who spent several weeks working in the Bell & Evans hatchery in Fredericksburg.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Christopher Bodeen, Associated Press
BEIJING - Fire swept through a poultry processing plant in northeastern China on Monday, trapping workers inside a slaughterhouse with only a single open exit and killing at least 119 people in one of the country's worst industrial disasters in years. Survivors described panic as workers, mostly women, struggled through smoke and flames to reach doors that turned out to be locked or blocked. One worker, Guo Yan, 39, said the emergency exit at her workstation could not be opened and she was knocked to the ground in the crush of workers searching for a way to escape.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
Emotions linger after disasters Kaitlyn Greeley burst into tears when a car backfired the other day. She's afraid to take her usual train to work at a Boston hospital. "This is how people live every day in other countries. But I'm not used to it here," said Greeley, 27, a technician at Tufts Medical Center, who was on duty Monday when part of the hospital was briefly evacuated even as blast victims were being treated in the ER. Anger, crying jags, and nightmares are all normal for survivors of the Boston Marathon bombings and witnesses to the mayhem.
NEWS
July 18, 2011 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along the shopping strip of Woodland Avenue, between the pizza shop and an abandoned building, a wind chime carved with the Chinese symbol for luck dangles in the doorway, next to a well-used fly strip. In walks a young woman chatting in Spanish on her cellphone. A regular, she passes through a second glass door to the middle of the store, stands in front of a wall of cages that house live chickens, and picks out a plump red pullet. A clerk holds the prized poultry by its feet and places it on the scale.
FOOD
June 9, 2011
Roast chicken redux If Boston Chicken's sad chain birds long ago ruined take-out chicken for me, Philly's new poultry roast-master, Rotisseur, has given the genre new life. At this rustic-chic 21st Street nook, hormone- and antibiotic-free Lancaster County chickens get a secret brine ("I make a concoction," co-owner Aaron Matzkin says, "with quite a bit of Japanese ingredients. . . . ") before spit-roasting to a superb juiciness that is chicken at its straightforward, sauce-less best.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
WHICH CAME first, the local, pasture-raised, free-roaming chicken, or the brown, heritage-breed organic egg? Most of us eat chicken and eggs regularly. The question is, what are we getting for our money? Where have those chicken and eggs been, and what are your options if you want to branch out from the mass-produced varieties that dominate most supermarket offerings? Whether you're a newly minted locavore, or a longtime proponent of the buy-fresh, buy-local movement, the notion of supporting smaller farms and producers is gaining popularity, driven by everything from creative chefs to the Food Network's nonstop foodie programming.
NEWS
August 2, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tevis Goldhaft, 95, a South Jersey veterinarian and business executive, died of heart failure July 20 at the Quadrangle, the retirement community in Haverford. "He was one of the world's foremost authorities on poultry diseases, and he traveled all over the world speaking on the subject of managing poultry diseases and preventing them," daughter Linda Johnson said. A 1986 Inquirer article reported that Dr. Goldhaft's father, Arthur, had grown up in the Alliance Colony in Cumberland County in South Jersey, "considered to be the first all-Jewish farm settlement in America.
NEWS
February 12, 2008 | By Sam Wood and Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The first hint of trouble was captured by surveillance cameras: Four males entering Northeast High School at 9:30 p.m. Sunday. At 4:30 a.m. yesterday, the school building engineer found a trail of what appeared to be sawdust leading from his office down the hallway. That's when he spotted the first chickens. "I turned on the light, and out of the corner of my eye, I saw 12 chickens in a circle," Michael Cice said. "Big, huge chickens. "I looked down the other end of the hallway and I saw more chickens.
NEWS
November 16, 2006 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Already known as a major poultry producer and a magnet for illegal immigrants, this quiet southern Delaware town now has new celebrity: movie stardom. Nearly 500 townspeople - Hispanics and Anglos alike - packed an auditorium at Delaware Technical and Community College on Monday night to see Estamos Aqui (We Are Here), a new documentary about the surge of Guatemalan immigrants here. The sympathetic portrayal, by a Wilmington film company, juxtaposed the poverty of the immigrants' homeland in the highlands of San Marcos, Guatemala, with the relative prosperity they have found in Delaware.
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