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Pound Cake

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FOOD
January 9, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
Most of us settle these days for store-bought cakes, either for lack of time or because of the intimidation factor: What if my cake is a failure? But there is something so satisfying about mixing together a few basic ingredients and transforming them into a delightful creation that smells great and tastes even better. Old-fashioned pound cake is a good choice because both method and ingredients are simple. It's rich enough to need no icing and simple enough even for super-conservative children.
FOOD
May 22, 2003 | By Bev Bennett FOR THE INQUIRER
Pound cake is the white sofa of the dessert world: classic and easy to accessorize. And this may be the year for pound cake, just as it is for understated white and neutral home furnishings. If you've avoided pound cakes and are considering a "knock-'em-dead" chocolate extravaganza for your Memorial Day menu, you're missing out on the luscious flavor and texture that an excessive (and essential) amount of butter, sugar and eggs can provide. A well-made pound cake has a texture as fine as $200 bed sheets and a flavor as delicate and rich as silk brocade.
NEWS
June 1, 2007 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dough isn't the only thing rising in Philadelphia's bakeries. Several bakers are fuming over the city's decision to ban trans fats, saying it's no small matter to tweak a cake or cookie recipe with a substitute ingredient, especially a recipe that dates back generations. "My grandfather passed away a couple of years ago, I'm glad he's not alive to witness this," said Mark Stock, a fourth-generation owner of Stock's Bakery in Port Richmond. Stock's pound cake, he says, isn't any old pound cake.
FOOD
August 31, 1988 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q.Is vitamin C completely destroyed when boiling water is poured over it? Does it do any good to drink hot water and lemon juice for a cold, other than just the benefits of drinking something hot? Nancy Sparks APO, N.Y. Q.I bought supplements containing both calcium and vitamin C in one pill, the idea being that vitamin C increases the body's ability to absorb and utilize calcium carbonate. But since vitamin C is an acid and calcium is a base, isn't it possible that they could neutralize each other if some moisture were to get in the jar, therefore making the pill valueless?
NEWS
September 3, 2003 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Growing up in Swampoodle 60 years ago, they all had nicknames: Froggy and Scribby, Jackie Prosciutto and Junior Punior, Gooch and Rocky. Theirs was a largely Italian enclave in North Philadelphia, where Sunday meant Latin Mass at St. Mary of the Eternal and early dinners of macaroni and red gravy. They played halfball with a broomstick bat, and their football was a rolled-up newspaper sealed with rubber bands. They were always together - at school, at play, at church - and it seemed as if they never tired of each other.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
COMEDIAN BILL COSBY has placed the blame for the high rate of incarceration, illiteracy and dropouts among youth squarely on parents. Cosby declined to be interviewed for our story. But here are excerpts from the 2004 speech he delivered during a commemoration of the 1954 Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education decision. "In our own neighborhood, we have men in prison. No longer is a person embarrassed because they're pregnant without a husband. No longer is a boy considered an embarrassment if he tries to run away from being the father . . . " "Ladies and gentlemen, the lower economic and lower middle economic people are [not]
FOOD
May 21, 1986 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Charcoal grilling is a natural for burgers and ribs, a trendy flavor enhancer for seafood and fish. But when it comes to the rest of the meal, most people find that grilling is an unnatural act. Its violent flame scorches the filmy skin of eggplants and runs slipshod over the tender buds of asparagus and broccoli. It can char a green bean beyond recognition and transform a cauliflower into a bouquet of briquettes. Dessert on the grill? It's practically unheard of. There's no little knob for you to turn to set a bed of burning charcoal to a nice, neat 350 degrees.
FOOD
August 23, 2012 | By Michael Klein
Everyone knows Cindy Rollins Hertneck, or someone like her: The baker. You want her at your party. Sure, there's her scintillating conversation, but you are really counting on her to walk through the door with a fabulous cake or batch of signature cookies. Hertneck, a former fourth-grade teacher from Merchantville, tiptoed into a more public role by baking a groom's cake and mini-wedding cakes for her daughter's wedding last November. At the reception, her niece Katie mentioned that she'd be getting married in July and wondered if her aunt would bake her cake.
NEWS
June 17, 2005 | MS. DEMEANOR
Dear Ms. Demeanor: We work for a member of City Council, answering phones, responding to letters and solving problems for constituents. When we solve a problem, constituents often want to show their appreciation in concrete ways, with gifts. Are they all off limits? For example, a senior citizen who we helped solve a problem with her property taxes sent us a thank you note and homemade lemon pound cake. Can we accept the cake? Then, a neighborhood businessman who we helped get a loading zone sent us a $25 gift certificate to thank us. Won't it offend him if we give it back?
SPORTS
June 1, 2012
NEW YORK - As Freddy Galvis stood in front of his locker at Busch Stadium last Friday night and talked about the relay throw that helped save a 5-3 win over the Cardinals, he did so while munching on a slice of pound cake. In all likelihood, he isn't the first player to celebrate a victory with a baked good. For all we know, he finished the cake, went back to the players' cafeteria, and chased a shot of Jameson with a beer. But what we saw was a 22-year-old who looked like he had just been dropped off at the local arcade after an American Legion game.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
August 23, 2012 | By Michael Klein
Everyone knows Cindy Rollins Hertneck, or someone like her: The baker. You want her at your party. Sure, there's her scintillating conversation, but you are really counting on her to walk through the door with a fabulous cake or batch of signature cookies. Hertneck, a former fourth-grade teacher from Merchantville, tiptoed into a more public role by baking a groom's cake and mini-wedding cakes for her daughter's wedding last November. At the reception, her niece Katie mentioned that she'd be getting married in July and wondered if her aunt would bake her cake.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Second of two parts. Therice Denby's career track crystallized in the late 1980s while she was enrolled at Cheyney University - but not in the classroom. Her entrepreneurial calling came in her dorm room, where she toiled over a double-burner hot plate and an electric frying pan. "I was selling food out of my room," Denby explained. Her menu included pork chop and chicken sandwiches. On weekends, she met breakfast demands with eggs, grits and potatoes. It was all forbidden by university rules so "we would buy incense to try to cover up the smell," Denby confessed recently.
SPORTS
June 1, 2012
NEW YORK - As Freddy Galvis stood in front of his locker at Busch Stadium last Friday night and talked about the relay throw that helped save a 5-3 win over the Cardinals, he did so while munching on a slice of pound cake. In all likelihood, he isn't the first player to celebrate a victory with a baked good. For all we know, he finished the cake, went back to the players' cafeteria, and chased a shot of Jameson with a beer. But what we saw was a 22-year-old who looked like he had just been dropped off at the local arcade after an American Legion game.
SPORTS
May 21, 2010
THERE IS AN old beatitude in the Church of Baseball Batechism: "Blessed are the hunch players, for they shall see three-run homers. " Charlie Manuel is a deacon in the C of B and his hunches are educated ones. When it comes to lineup tinkering, he is the Thomas Edison of better mousetrap building. The matinee against Lou Piniella's scuffling Cubs was leadoff man Jimmy Rollins' fourth game since he came off the disabled list after missing a month with a calf strain suffered minutes before the home opener running a get-loose sprint on the newly sodded grass of The Bank.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
COMEDIAN BILL COSBY has placed the blame for the high rate of incarceration, illiteracy and dropouts among youth squarely on parents. Cosby declined to be interviewed for our story. But here are excerpts from the 2004 speech he delivered during a commemoration of the 1954 Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education decision. "In our own neighborhood, we have men in prison. No longer is a person embarrassed because they're pregnant without a husband. No longer is a boy considered an embarrassment if he tries to run away from being the father . . . " "Ladies and gentlemen, the lower economic and lower middle economic people are [not]
NEWS
June 1, 2007 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dough isn't the only thing rising in Philadelphia's bakeries. Several bakers are fuming over the city's decision to ban trans fats, saying it's no small matter to tweak a cake or cookie recipe with a substitute ingredient, especially a recipe that dates back generations. "My grandfather passed away a couple of years ago, I'm glad he's not alive to witness this," said Mark Stock, a fourth-generation owner of Stock's Bakery in Port Richmond. Stock's pound cake, he says, isn't any old pound cake.
NEWS
June 17, 2005 | MS. DEMEANOR
Dear Ms. Demeanor: We work for a member of City Council, answering phones, responding to letters and solving problems for constituents. When we solve a problem, constituents often want to show their appreciation in concrete ways, with gifts. Are they all off limits? For example, a senior citizen who we helped solve a problem with her property taxes sent us a thank you note and homemade lemon pound cake. Can we accept the cake? Then, a neighborhood businessman who we helped get a loading zone sent us a $25 gift certificate to thank us. Won't it offend him if we give it back?
NEWS
September 3, 2003 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Growing up in Swampoodle 60 years ago, they all had nicknames: Froggy and Scribby, Jackie Prosciutto and Junior Punior, Gooch and Rocky. Theirs was a largely Italian enclave in North Philadelphia, where Sunday meant Latin Mass at St. Mary of the Eternal and early dinners of macaroni and red gravy. They played halfball with a broomstick bat, and their football was a rolled-up newspaper sealed with rubber bands. They were always together - at school, at play, at church - and it seemed as if they never tired of each other.
FOOD
May 22, 2003 | By Bev Bennett FOR THE INQUIRER
Pound cake is the white sofa of the dessert world: classic and easy to accessorize. And this may be the year for pound cake, just as it is for understated white and neutral home furnishings. If you've avoided pound cakes and are considering a "knock-'em-dead" chocolate extravaganza for your Memorial Day menu, you're missing out on the luscious flavor and texture that an excessive (and essential) amount of butter, sugar and eggs can provide. A well-made pound cake has a texture as fine as $200 bed sheets and a flavor as delicate and rich as silk brocade.
SPORTS
November 30, 2002 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bringing down Washington Township fullback Ryne Cantwell is a tough job, but add bone-chilling conditions and the chore becomes even tougher. Eastern found that out the hard way yesterday. The 5-foot-10, 210-pound Cantwell plowed through defenders en route to 159 yards and four touchdowns as the Minutemen marched to a 35-7 road triumph against Eastern in a Burlco/Olympic Conference American Division football game. The win clinched at least a share of the American Division title for defending champion Washington Township (10-1 overall, 7-1 division)
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