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Pov

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1995 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
It's a banner year for P.O.V., PBS's annual independent-documentaries series, which is leaving some of its politics behind. PBS is having tough times, and P.O.V., a lightning rod for congressional dyspepsia in past years, may be lying low. Funny that the result is a series of captivating independent films with broad appeal. One of them, Dealers Among Dealers, scheduled at the end of the series on July 25, actually extols capitalism and free enterprise, and, for the first time in memory, there are no films about gays.
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
P.O.V. - the title stands for "point of view" - returns for its second season tonight on Channel 12 at 10 p.m. This 12-week series offers a notably diverse range of documentary films, most of them exhibiting a strong subjectivity - a point of view - about their chosen subjects. Tonight's opening P.O.V. entry will be difficult to top: It's Who Killed Vincent Chin?, a harrowing, fascinating film directed by Christine Choy and Renee Tajima that was nominated for a 1988 Oscar. Who Killed Vincent Chin?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1991 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Television Critic
"Modern man suffers from a kind of poverty of the spirit," said the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., "which stands in glaring contrast to his scientific and technological abundances. " We are nearly 30 years more modern than we were when Dr. King spoke those words at Berkeley, Calif., but outposts remain - even in that most technologically obsessed medium of television - in which men and women display spiritual richness. P.O.V., the PBS series that began its fourth season Tuesday, and which will feature an excerpt of Dr. King's speech in a July documentary, is a distinguished example - a showcase for films made against heavy odds by individuals with minuscule finances but deep reserves of spirit.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By Jonathan Storm, Television Critic Inquirer staff writer Gail Shister contributed to this article
Saying the short film contained a "pervasive tone of ridicule" of the Catholic Church, PBS has pulled "Stop the Church" from the schedule of its P.O.V. documentary series. P.O.V. boss David M. Davis said he agreed with the decision to withhold the 23-minute film from the Aug. 27 schedule - not because of its subject matter, but because it would have followed too soon after another controversial P.O.V., "Tongues Untied. " That explicit film about gay black men, shown July 16, was widely praised for its artistic achievement.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1993 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
As announcements go, it's the same old boring news. As television, it's an annual cause for celebration: the festival of independent documentaries that is P.O.V. Just as the commercial networks are dozing off for the summer every year, P.O.V., a PBS showcase of unusual, often opinionated, always stimulating films, gears up. Like Northern Exposure or Seinfeld, it's a program you can plan your week around - or you could, if Channel 12 would air it at the same time every week.
NEWS
July 22, 1997 | by Melanie C. Redmond, Daily News Staff Writer
"P.O.V.: GIRLS LIKE US. " 10 tonight, Channel 12. "Girls Like Us" is a documentary worth watching if you're a teen-ager or someone who wishes to understand teen-age life in the '90s. The hour-long documentary, which profiled four South Philadelphia girls over the course of four years, will be broadcast nationally tonight on PBS's critically acclaimed "P.O.V. " The girls come from different cultural backgrounds (Anna is Vietnamese-American, De'Yona is African-American, Lisa is Italian-American and Raelene is a combination of European and Native American)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1990 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Summertime, and the viewin's not easy. The TV networks go into rehash mode in summer, barely bothering to warm up the leftovers they serve us. For viewers, that means an opportunity to look elsewhere: offbeat cable channels, independent stations and, especially, public television. On Tuesday, for instance, rather than suffer a second time as Michael and Elliot engage in office politics on thirtysomething or see Sam's return-return to the 1957 South on Quantum Leap, you should try WHYY-TV (Channel 12)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2010
POV. THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN AMERICA: DANIEL ELLSBERG. 9 tonight, Channel 12. ANYONE WHO believes the subject of "The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg" is or was actually dangerous will probably avoid even watching the Oscar-nominated documentary with which PBS' "POV" wraps up its 23rd season tonight. Let's just say they don't call it "POV" - as in "point of view" - for nothing. Produced and directed by Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith, this two-hour look at the events leading up to Ellsberg's release of the classified reports about the war in Vietnam that came to be known as the Pentagon Papers is many things: a formidable history lesson, an examination of one man's crisis of conscience, an action movie for wonks, even a love story.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"Alfie" apparently failed to cure Jude Law of his need to be unfavorably compared to Michael Caine. He resurrects a totemic Caine role again in the remake "Sleuth" and ups the stakes by appearing opposite Caine himself, who takes the role once occupied by Laurence Olivier. Much has changed from 1972 original, but its structural essence is intact - a two-character piece built around the battle of wits between an apparently shallow young man and a sophisticated older gent. Law is Milo, an out-of-work actor visiting the modernist country estate of a wealthy writer (Caine)
NEWS
September 1, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
These are supposed to be the dog days of television, aren't they? Between the writers' strike and the usual amount of summer reruns, the Vast Wasteland should be even more arid than usual, isn't that so? Well, it's mostly true, unless your idea of a good night of television is a rerun of Full House followed by the sixth time around for a few of those Moonlighting shows. (All right, I want to see hands: Which of you used to think that series was actually witty?) But tonight, there is such a clear exception to the current rule that attention must be paid.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2010
POV. THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN AMERICA: DANIEL ELLSBERG. 9 tonight, Channel 12. ANYONE WHO believes the subject of "The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg" is or was actually dangerous will probably avoid even watching the Oscar-nominated documentary with which PBS' "POV" wraps up its 23rd season tonight. Let's just say they don't call it "POV" - as in "point of view" - for nothing. Produced and directed by Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith, this two-hour look at the events leading up to Ellsberg's release of the classified reports about the war in Vietnam that came to be known as the Pentagon Papers is many things: a formidable history lesson, an examination of one man's crisis of conscience, an action movie for wonks, even a love story.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2010
9 tonight CHANNEL 12 A Brooklyn, N.Y., teenage track star Avery Klein-Cloud (right), the adopted African-American child of white Jewish lesbians, contacts her birth mother, and the response throws her into crisis over her "true" identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"Alfie" apparently failed to cure Jude Law of his need to be unfavorably compared to Michael Caine. He resurrects a totemic Caine role again in the remake "Sleuth" and ups the stakes by appearing opposite Caine himself, who takes the role once occupied by Laurence Olivier. Much has changed from 1972 original, but its structural essence is intact - a two-character piece built around the battle of wits between an apparently shallow young man and a sophisticated older gent. Law is Milo, an out-of-work actor visiting the modernist country estate of a wealthy writer (Caine)
NEWS
July 22, 1997 | by Melanie C. Redmond, Daily News Staff Writer
"P.O.V.: GIRLS LIKE US. " 10 tonight, Channel 12. "Girls Like Us" is a documentary worth watching if you're a teen-ager or someone who wishes to understand teen-age life in the '90s. The hour-long documentary, which profiled four South Philadelphia girls over the course of four years, will be broadcast nationally tonight on PBS's critically acclaimed "P.O.V. " The girls come from different cultural backgrounds (Anna is Vietnamese-American, De'Yona is African-American, Lisa is Italian-American and Raelene is a combination of European and Native American)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1995 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
It's a banner year for P.O.V., PBS's annual independent-documentaries series, which is leaving some of its politics behind. PBS is having tough times, and P.O.V., a lightning rod for congressional dyspepsia in past years, may be lying low. Funny that the result is a series of captivating independent films with broad appeal. One of them, Dealers Among Dealers, scheduled at the end of the series on July 25, actually extols capitalism and free enterprise, and, for the first time in memory, there are no films about gays.
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