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Poverty

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NEWS
August 31, 2005
AS PRESIDENT Bush's approval ratings continue to slide, his allies have begun to grumble. The economy is improving. Why isn't the president getting the credit? Here's a clue: According to new Census Bureau figures, the number of Americans who slipped into poverty is now 37 million, an increase of 1.1 million from 2003. In the Philadelphia, the number increased so dramatically, that the city jumped from 11th- to ninth-poorest in the nation. The White House says it's not surprised by the numbers.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
DURING A crowded launch of Mayor Nutter's new anti-poverty initiative yesterday at the Free Library, someone observed, "It costs a lot to be poor. " And that, among the many dispiriting facts and helpful observations uttered yesterday, might be the most meaningful. Poverty extracts a huge price tag from individuals - in health, well-being, future potential and general living conditions, to name just a few. But poverty also extracts a high price from all of us in the city. Some of those costs can be measured specifically, like the nearly $300 million that the city spends for "health and opportunity," which includes public health and housing (but not the library, or parks and rec)
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By MICHAEL B. KATZ
Jack Kemp, chosen to head the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Bush administration, proposes to launch a new War on Poverty. Will he succeed any better than Lyndon Johnson, who officially began the last one in 1964? What lessons should he learn? According to many current assessments, during the years from 1964 until 1972-73, when federal social benefits in real dollars peaked, Washington threw massive amounts of money into a futile attempt to eliminate poverty.
NEWS
January 5, 2009 | By MARGY WALLER
LONG before the onset of the current economic slide, some Washington insiders called on government to set a goal of reducing poverty. While recognizing the good intentions, we must acknowledge what the recent election proves: Changes in our nation in the years since citizens heard a similar plea - more than 40 years ago - require a new vision for the economy. Any effort to revive a policy and political focus targeted specifically on the poor will demand significant energy and resources and, unfortunately, can't yield the desired policy results.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By CRAIG SNYDER
Notwithstanding the tortured and intrigue-filled path by which we have arrived here, Philadelphia's voters now have a choice of mayoral candidates that is well above average. Joe Egan and Ed Rendell are bright and serious people who are actually talking about bold ideas and policy choices needed to govern a city that has teetered on the brink of financial collapse. The fact is, however, that if Philadelphia is to stem its decline, far more is required than to solve the budget crisis.
NEWS
October 18, 2007
IAPPLAUD Mark Hughes for focusing on the compelling challenges we face in Philadelphia. I only wish he'd made the acquaintance of Dr. Ala Stanford Frey at Temple University before declaring in his Oct. 15 op-ed that poverty in Philadelphia is not fixable. Dr. Frey was born to a teenage single mom in North Philadelphia. She applied herself and went on to medical school after participating in the Fattah Higher Education Conference, which has affected more than 10,000 disadvantaged young people.
NEWS
June 28, 2007
AT THE press conference that launched Safe and Sound's Children's Report Card, Pat de Carlo of the Norris Square Civic Association said, "Make no mistake: This is about poverty. Until we solve the problem of poverty, none of the issues that are being addressed here will disappear. " She is right, and, in fact, the Report Card shows a huge increase in poverty. While I agree with the Daily News that we need to look carefully at all programs that serve the city's children, all the scrutiny in the world won't create jobs for the parents, or build houses for the families, or provide the mental-health services so crucial to solving the issues of abuse and neglect.
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | BY CAL THOMAS
America seems to be locked in an unwinnable debate over who or what is responsible for poverty. Conservatives blame the welfare programs of the Great Society. Liberals blame the Reagan-Bush years which they believe have gutted programs that were working. Is there a third way? Can't we all "get along," in the words of Rodney King? It should be stipulated that there are some people who are, and will forever remain, poor. These are the impoverished in spirit. Their list of addictions, whatever else it includes, is topped by a lack of initiative.
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | By Donald Kimelman, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
You wouldn't know it from watching the presidential debates, but the War on Poverty may be about to resume. Not the all-out war envisioned by President Lyndon Johnson, but something more akin to a guerrilla war: concentrating resources on the most promising targets. Anyone who doubts that attacking poverty is back on the national agenda should have been in Williamsburg, Va., last week for the Democratic Leadership Council's (DLC) second annual conference. The first thing to understand about the DLC is that it was formed by a group of white, centrist Democratic leaders to move the party away from its heavy identification with the poor and minorities.
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NEWS
January 14, 2016
By Claire Grandison and Jamie Gullen While the recent news that our national unemployment rate has fallen to around 5 percent is cause for optimism, a troubling trend should not be overlooked: the persistently high youth unemployment rate. According to the latest release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for youths aged 16 to 19 is 16 percent, more than triple the national average. For African American youths, the number is 24 percent. Although the youth unemployment rate remains consistently high, it is often written off. Some people believe that young people are merely seeking employment to supplement a comfortable family income, occupy time over a languid summer, or gain experience for a college application.
NEWS
December 31, 2015
By Antony Davies and James R. Harrigan Once again, the Fraser Institute has released its annual Economic Freedom of North America report. And once again - unsurprisingly- the United States is in a downward spiral. Over the past 15 years, the United States has dropped from an 8.6 on Fraser's 10-point scale to a 7.7. In 2000, Fraser ranked the United States as the most economically free country on the planet. Today, we are 14th - less economically free than Canada, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, and the United Arab Emirates.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2015 | Solomon Jones, Daily News Columnist
For me, Christmas is a time for reflection and gratitude, a time of celebration and worship. It is a time that we give gifts to commemorate the birth of Jesus. Christmas is a time of reflection for my family, too. We laugh about Christmases past, share gifts and smiles in the present, and share hope for what's to come in the future. That future is embodied in our children, so the gifts are often for them. However, this Christmas, as my wife and I endeavor to give my children the gifts they desire, I'm going to do something different.
NEWS
December 13, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Jonathan Tamari, and Chris Brennan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
NEW YORK - Former Gov. Ed Rendell on Saturday challenged Philadelphia's business and political elite to contribute personally to Mayor-elect Jim Kenney's $60 million goal of providing universal pre-kindergarten throughout the city. Speaking at the main gala of the annual Pennsylvania Society weekend, he made a broad appeal to the well-heeled crowd, saying that poverty remained a stubborn problem throughout Pennsylvania in spite of the renaissance enjoyed in parts of Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has made some strides in helping its poor over the last two years, but has a long way to go as the most deeply impoverished of the nation's 10 largest cities, according to a City Hall report released Friday. An office established two years ago to reduce poverty in the city reported that in the last year alone, a new network of benefits centers has helped connect several thousand impoverished Philadelphians with about $13 million in local, state, and federal benefits. Other measures also have yielded results since Mayor Nutter created the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity in 2013 and placed Eva Gladstein at the helm as executive director, the group reported.
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Even as poverty leveled off in New Jersey last year, it remained at a 50-year high and showed no signs of abating given persistent structural problems such as income inequality and changing employment trends that are trapping the poor, a new report has found. "New Jersey's current and long-term employment outlooks are ominous and raise the possibility that we are witnessing profound and long-term shifts in employment opportunity, potentially requiring corresponding paradigm shifts in government economic development and antipoverty strategies," reads a 146-page annual report of the Legal Services of New Jersey Poverty Research Institute.
NEWS
November 13, 2015
WE ARE HEADING toward the holiday that encourages gluttony. Supermarkets are already overstocking their shelves with traditional Thanksgiving food items. But in many homes, there will be people who won't have a traditional Thanksgiving dinner or a meal at all that day. How many of us stuff ourselves on Thanksgiving not fully appreciating that many people regularly go hungry, scraping by on a few dollars a day? Typically at the beginning of the month, I select a personal finance book with wisdom or strategies to help individuals improve their financial situation.
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | Daily News Editorial Board
FIRST, WE congratulate Jim Kenney on his victory in yesterday's election, after an impressive campaign that revealed the mayor-elect as a man of passion and purpose. After more than two decades in city government, Kenney understands the challenges that the city faces in the years ahead. Succeeding as mayor means being attuned to the street-level issues, as well as the ability to focus on the "long game" of big and complicated issues. We believe three issues in particular are of overriding importance for the Kenney administration: *  Poverty . The figure is always shocking, however many times we hear it. More than one in four Philadelphians live in poverty, nearly 400,000 in a city of 1.5 million.
FOOD
October 23, 2015 | Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
Leave it to a Canadian to put a positive spin on SNAP (a.k.a. food stamps), a program whose ungainly full name is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program . "We don't have food stamps in Canada. A lot of Americans don't appreciate that the program is actually really cool and effective," says Leanne Brown , author of Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4 a Day (Workman). She'll discuss the book and sign copies Tuesday, Oct. 27 at the Free Library of Philadelphia . The book has become an unlikely phenomenon, and the interest in it started before it was officially published in July.
NEWS
October 1, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among America's 10 biggest cities, an examination of federal data by The Inquirer shows. The city is already the poorest in that group. Deep poverty is measured as income of 50 percent or less of the poverty rate. A family of four living in deep poverty takes in $12,000 or less annually, half the poverty rate of $24,000 for a family that size. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.3 percent, or around 186,000 people - 60,000 of whom are children, an examination of the newly released U.S. Census 2014 American Community Survey shows.
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