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Poverty

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NEWS
August 31, 2005
AS PRESIDENT Bush's approval ratings continue to slide, his allies have begun to grumble. The economy is improving. Why isn't the president getting the credit? Here's a clue: According to new Census Bureau figures, the number of Americans who slipped into poverty is now 37 million, an increase of 1.1 million from 2003. In the Philadelphia, the number increased so dramatically, that the city jumped from 11th- to ninth-poorest in the nation. The White House says it's not surprised by the numbers.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
DURING A crowded launch of Mayor Nutter's new anti-poverty initiative yesterday at the Free Library, someone observed, "It costs a lot to be poor. " And that, among the many dispiriting facts and helpful observations uttered yesterday, might be the most meaningful. Poverty extracts a huge price tag from individuals - in health, well-being, future potential and general living conditions, to name just a few. But poverty also extracts a high price from all of us in the city. Some of those costs can be measured specifically, like the nearly $300 million that the city spends for "health and opportunity," which includes public health and housing (but not the library, or parks and rec)
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By MICHAEL B. KATZ
Jack Kemp, chosen to head the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Bush administration, proposes to launch a new War on Poverty. Will he succeed any better than Lyndon Johnson, who officially began the last one in 1964? What lessons should he learn? According to many current assessments, during the years from 1964 until 1972-73, when federal social benefits in real dollars peaked, Washington threw massive amounts of money into a futile attempt to eliminate poverty.
NEWS
January 5, 2009 | By MARGY WALLER
LONG before the onset of the current economic slide, some Washington insiders called on government to set a goal of reducing poverty. While recognizing the good intentions, we must acknowledge what the recent election proves: Changes in our nation in the years since citizens heard a similar plea - more than 40 years ago - require a new vision for the economy. Any effort to revive a policy and political focus targeted specifically on the poor will demand significant energy and resources and, unfortunately, can't yield the desired policy results.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By CRAIG SNYDER
Notwithstanding the tortured and intrigue-filled path by which we have arrived here, Philadelphia's voters now have a choice of mayoral candidates that is well above average. Joe Egan and Ed Rendell are bright and serious people who are actually talking about bold ideas and policy choices needed to govern a city that has teetered on the brink of financial collapse. The fact is, however, that if Philadelphia is to stem its decline, far more is required than to solve the budget crisis.
NEWS
October 18, 2007
IAPPLAUD Mark Hughes for focusing on the compelling challenges we face in Philadelphia. I only wish he'd made the acquaintance of Dr. Ala Stanford Frey at Temple University before declaring in his Oct. 15 op-ed that poverty in Philadelphia is not fixable. Dr. Frey was born to a teenage single mom in North Philadelphia. She applied herself and went on to medical school after participating in the Fattah Higher Education Conference, which has affected more than 10,000 disadvantaged young people.
NEWS
June 28, 2007
AT THE press conference that launched Safe and Sound's Children's Report Card, Pat de Carlo of the Norris Square Civic Association said, "Make no mistake: This is about poverty. Until we solve the problem of poverty, none of the issues that are being addressed here will disappear. " She is right, and, in fact, the Report Card shows a huge increase in poverty. While I agree with the Daily News that we need to look carefully at all programs that serve the city's children, all the scrutiny in the world won't create jobs for the parents, or build houses for the families, or provide the mental-health services so crucial to solving the issues of abuse and neglect.
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | BY CAL THOMAS
America seems to be locked in an unwinnable debate over who or what is responsible for poverty. Conservatives blame the welfare programs of the Great Society. Liberals blame the Reagan-Bush years which they believe have gutted programs that were working. Is there a third way? Can't we all "get along," in the words of Rodney King? It should be stipulated that there are some people who are, and will forever remain, poor. These are the impoverished in spirit. Their list of addictions, whatever else it includes, is topped by a lack of initiative.
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | By Donald Kimelman, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
You wouldn't know it from watching the presidential debates, but the War on Poverty may be about to resume. Not the all-out war envisioned by President Lyndon Johnson, but something more akin to a guerrilla war: concentrating resources on the most promising targets. Anyone who doubts that attacking poverty is back on the national agenda should have been in Williamsburg, Va., last week for the Democratic Leadership Council's (DLC) second annual conference. The first thing to understand about the DLC is that it was formed by a group of white, centrist Democratic leaders to move the party away from its heavy identification with the poor and minorities.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Miley's social responsibility With success and wealth comes social responsibility, says Miley Cyrus , whose Happy Hippie Foundation helps homeless youth. Cyrus tells Elle that she's a lot like the character she plays in Woody Allen 's Crisis in Six Scenes : a hippie activist riddled with anxiety about the world's injustices. The role reminded Cyrus of the guilt that consumes her for not helping others. "I was covered in rashes because I was so stressed," she says. "So now I try to do as much as I can. " Cyrus says she has vowed never to do the red carpet again, since it's such an ostentatious sign of privilege.
NEWS
September 2, 2016
By Ronnie Dunn We know what the Republicans and Democrats think about race and poverty in America. Now it's time to see what they actually plan to do about these persistent and potentially catastrophic societal problems. Following the two national conventions there were some significant takeaways related to how each party views race, exemplified by the images themselves. The Republicans reflected the monochromatic early days of television where nonwhites were rarely seen on the TV screen.
NEWS
August 24, 2016 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Columnist
SO THIS IS IT? Donald Trump's long-expected "pivot" toward more substance in race for the White House is a sudden show of concern for the plight of black people in America? OK, but the problem is that whenever Trump tries to pivot in the 2016 race, he usually trips over his own two feet. Last week, in a series of speeches beginning in West Bend, Wis. - an exurban community about 40 minutes outside of Milwaukee, site of recent racial unrest over the killing of a black criminal suspect and often described as the most segregated big city in America - Trump has suddenly begun addressing what he sees as the problems facing black citizens today.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Like thousands of other delegates to the Democratic National Convention this week, Gendy Tchuda made her way to Philadelphia by plane. Unlike most, the 25-year-old from Bayamon, Puerto Rico, bought a one-way ticket. "There's no jobs in Puerto Rico right now," said Tchuda, who's been searching fruitlessly for work since graduating from the University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras in May 2015. "If I can get an opportunity, I would stay here. " Tchuda is among 23 Bernie Sanders delegates from Puerto Rico, which sent 67 delegates altogether.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
Richard Henry and Robert Jones took a break Tuesday from their maintenance jobs and sat on a ledge outside the Municipal Services Building to watch the protests that had overtaken the plaza. From a stage, a woman crooned for the cheering crowd a shaky soul song - an original, it seemed: "Feeeel the Berrrnn. " There was a Bernie supporter in a Superman costume and another in Bernie jammies. There was guy bearing a large wooden cross on his shoulder with the message, "Vote 4 Jesus.
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Grace Toohey, Staff Writer
Ryan Morehart thought he had found a field that was both valuable and enjoyable: child care. But as he advanced, he realized there wasn't much advancing to do. He considered going back to school, but that didn't promise enough financial benefit. "I love working with kids," said Morehart, 29, of Philadelphia. But after nine years in early childhood education, he switched to office management. "My benefits are a lot better, the pay is a lot better, I have money left over to the point where we could do stuff," he said.
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
We see all kinds of symptoms. An 8-year-old boy with a badly swollen jaw due to an infection. A 2-year-old boy who weighs what a 1-year-old should because he can't eat solid foods. A 6-year-old girl who can't fall asleep at night or pay attention in school. A 4-year-old who gets teased at preschool because he "talks funny. " One look inside their mouths, and the telltale erosions and cavernous divots on their "baby teeth" bring to light the probable cause of all these problems that cause so much pain and disability, and yet are so preventable.
NEWS
June 15, 2016
By Darrell L. Clarke, Bobby Henon, Blondell Reynolds Brown, and Bill Greenlee On Thursday, City Council will pass a progressive budget that makes historic investments in our children, public spaces, and long-term economic vitality, and demonstrates that cities can rise above the political paralysis gripping state capitals and Washington. We commend Mayor Kenney and his staff for a bold first budget and for a collaborative and productive process. Communication with Council was key to building consensus and producing a final budget that is fiscally responsible and equitable.
NEWS
May 26, 2016
PHILADELPHIA'S soda tax has been the subject of cheers and jeers from Democratic presidential candidates, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and a slew of pundits on both sides of the issue. If only Philadelphia's deep poverty crisis and the near-destruction of our public schools at the hands of former Gov. Corbett had garnered this much attention. Our city finds itself at a crossroads between new prosperity and the abject poverty that plagues one out of four of our neighbors.
NEWS
May 12, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Kenney's plan critical to combat poverty City Council President Darrell L. Clarke says a proposed 3-cents-an-ounce sugary-beverage tax is too high ("Clarke: Drink tax may be high," Friday). The headline ought to have read: Illiteracy is too high; obesity rate is too high; high school dropout rate is too high; number of crumbling recreation centers is too high; number of decrepit libraries is too high; number of pre-K children without a classroom is too high. Mayor Kenney's Rebuilding Community Infrastructure initiative would begin the process of transforming Philadelphia from the poorest large city in America into the most successful large city in America.
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