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Poverty

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NEWS
August 31, 2005
AS PRESIDENT Bush's approval ratings continue to slide, his allies have begun to grumble. The economy is improving. Why isn't the president getting the credit? Here's a clue: According to new Census Bureau figures, the number of Americans who slipped into poverty is now 37 million, an increase of 1.1 million from 2003. In the Philadelphia, the number increased so dramatically, that the city jumped from 11th- to ninth-poorest in the nation. The White House says it's not surprised by the numbers.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
DURING A crowded launch of Mayor Nutter's new anti-poverty initiative yesterday at the Free Library, someone observed, "It costs a lot to be poor. " And that, among the many dispiriting facts and helpful observations uttered yesterday, might be the most meaningful. Poverty extracts a huge price tag from individuals - in health, well-being, future potential and general living conditions, to name just a few. But poverty also extracts a high price from all of us in the city. Some of those costs can be measured specifically, like the nearly $300 million that the city spends for "health and opportunity," which includes public health and housing (but not the library, or parks and rec)
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By MICHAEL B. KATZ
Jack Kemp, chosen to head the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Bush administration, proposes to launch a new War on Poverty. Will he succeed any better than Lyndon Johnson, who officially began the last one in 1964? What lessons should he learn? According to many current assessments, during the years from 1964 until 1972-73, when federal social benefits in real dollars peaked, Washington threw massive amounts of money into a futile attempt to eliminate poverty.
NEWS
January 5, 2009 | By MARGY WALLER
LONG before the onset of the current economic slide, some Washington insiders called on government to set a goal of reducing poverty. While recognizing the good intentions, we must acknowledge what the recent election proves: Changes in our nation in the years since citizens heard a similar plea - more than 40 years ago - require a new vision for the economy. Any effort to revive a policy and political focus targeted specifically on the poor will demand significant energy and resources and, unfortunately, can't yield the desired policy results.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By CRAIG SNYDER
Notwithstanding the tortured and intrigue-filled path by which we have arrived here, Philadelphia's voters now have a choice of mayoral candidates that is well above average. Joe Egan and Ed Rendell are bright and serious people who are actually talking about bold ideas and policy choices needed to govern a city that has teetered on the brink of financial collapse. The fact is, however, that if Philadelphia is to stem its decline, far more is required than to solve the budget crisis.
NEWS
October 18, 2007
IAPPLAUD Mark Hughes for focusing on the compelling challenges we face in Philadelphia. I only wish he'd made the acquaintance of Dr. Ala Stanford Frey at Temple University before declaring in his Oct. 15 op-ed that poverty in Philadelphia is not fixable. Dr. Frey was born to a teenage single mom in North Philadelphia. She applied herself and went on to medical school after participating in the Fattah Higher Education Conference, which has affected more than 10,000 disadvantaged young people.
NEWS
June 28, 2007
AT THE press conference that launched Safe and Sound's Children's Report Card, Pat de Carlo of the Norris Square Civic Association said, "Make no mistake: This is about poverty. Until we solve the problem of poverty, none of the issues that are being addressed here will disappear. " She is right, and, in fact, the Report Card shows a huge increase in poverty. While I agree with the Daily News that we need to look carefully at all programs that serve the city's children, all the scrutiny in the world won't create jobs for the parents, or build houses for the families, or provide the mental-health services so crucial to solving the issues of abuse and neglect.
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | BY CAL THOMAS
America seems to be locked in an unwinnable debate over who or what is responsible for poverty. Conservatives blame the welfare programs of the Great Society. Liberals blame the Reagan-Bush years which they believe have gutted programs that were working. Is there a third way? Can't we all "get along," in the words of Rodney King? It should be stipulated that there are some people who are, and will forever remain, poor. These are the impoverished in spirit. Their list of addictions, whatever else it includes, is topped by a lack of initiative.
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | By Donald Kimelman, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
You wouldn't know it from watching the presidential debates, but the War on Poverty may be about to resume. Not the all-out war envisioned by President Lyndon Johnson, but something more akin to a guerrilla war: concentrating resources on the most promising targets. Anyone who doubts that attacking poverty is back on the national agenda should have been in Williamsburg, Va., last week for the Democratic Leadership Council's (DLC) second annual conference. The first thing to understand about the DLC is that it was formed by a group of white, centrist Democratic leaders to move the party away from its heavy identification with the poor and minorities.
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NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Latinos have the highest rate of poverty of any racial or ethnic group in Philadelphia. In the city, 44 percent of Latinos live in poverty - twice the national rate of 23.5 percent. The overall Philadelphia poverty rate is 26.3 percent. Latino poverty prevails throughout most of the region as well, both in the Pennsylvania suburbs and in South Jersey. In six of the eight counties in the region - Bucks and Chester Counties being the exceptions - Latinos have the highest poverty rate of all groups.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY DARRELL L. CLARKE
  AS RECENTLY cited in the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, Philadelphia is still the "poorest of America's 10 largest cities. " While the report showed that 9,000 residents moved out of poverty last year, and that is encouraging, it's hard to take any comfort when so many of our fellow citizens remain in poverty, many of them children and elderly. Over the last 20 years we have witnessed growth in the gap between the haves and have nots and the squeezing of the middle class.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Already the poorest big city in America, Philadelphia also has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.2 percent, or nearly 185,000 people, including about 60,000 children. That's almost twice the U.S. deep-poverty rate of 6.3 percent. Camden's deep-poverty rate of 20 percent is more than three times the national mark, but its population is a fraction of Philadelphia's.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
ISSUE | NEEDY Helping hands The Jewish community is not immune to hardship ("Area's Jewish population is not immune to poverty," Sept. 16). I am a packer and driver for the Beth Sholom Mitzvah Pantry. It is very gratifying when you go to a person's house and are able to provide basic food items. We only pack twice a month, but our tight-knit group of semi-retirees and retirees feels as though we are helping and hope that one day we can break the poverty cycle. |Ann Gold, Philadelphia, gold500219@aol.com Charity is the key Reality has finally hit that the area Jewish population does not all go to Florida in the winter ("Area's Jewish population is not immune to poverty," Sept.
NEWS
September 19, 2014
THE U.S. CENSUS released figures this week that show that the national poverty rate has decreased for the first time since 2006. Don't rush to plan a victory parade, though. The percentage of people in poverty has dropped slightly, but the implications are more mathematical than practical: Median household income has remained the same, and the number of those in poverty in 2013 - 45.3 million - is about the same as the year before. And worse news: The percentage of people living below the poverty level in the Philadelphia metro area rose slightly from 2010 to 2013, from 12.7 percent to 13.5 percent; poverty rates in the city fell slightly.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. poverty rate has decreased for the first time since 2006, according to U.S. Census figures released Tuesday. Children's poverty also declined, while median household income barely changed between 2012 and 2013. The report further shows that 42 million people, 13.4 percent of Americans, were without health-insurance coverage in 2013. The data were compiled in the 2014 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement, which describes conditions in 2013.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The chicken for Rosh Hashanah dinner won't be kosher. Kosher meat is expensive, and Doreen Shelow can't afford it. "People think Jews aren't poor," said Shelow, 56, a disabled and divorced Jewish woman raising her grandson well below the poverty line in a tiny apartment in Somerton, in Northeast Philadelphia. "It's an aspect of poverty that's overlooked. Even other Jews don't accept that there are poor Jews. " Often unseen and rarely discussed, Jewish poverty in the Philadelphia area hobbles lives in the same way it does among other ethnic and cultural groups.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
Paul Ryan is counting on this: Because he says he wants to preserve a safety net, speaks with concern about poor people, and put out a 73-page report, many will elide over the details of the proposals he made last week in his major antipoverty speech. The Wisconsin Republican congressman is certainly aware that one of the biggest political difficulties he and his conservative colleagues face is that many voters suspect them of having far more compassion for a wealthy person paying taxes than for a poor or middle-income person looking for a job. So Ryan gave a well-crafted address at the American Enterprise Institute in which the centerpiece sounded brand spanking new: the "Opportunity Grant.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE CITY yesterday opened six BenePhilly Centers to assist low-income Philadelphians who are eligible for benefits but are not receiving them. Increasing benefits access is a major goal of Shared Prosperity, an anti-poverty plan that Mayor Nutter unveiled last year. He tasked Eva Gladstein, executive director of the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity, with creating and implementing the plan. The centers, Gladstein said, will help people "get benefits that can help alleviate some of the worst effects of poverty.
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