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Poverty

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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
August 31, 2005
AS PRESIDENT Bush's approval ratings continue to slide, his allies have begun to grumble. The economy is improving. Why isn't the president getting the credit? Here's a clue: According to new Census Bureau figures, the number of Americans who slipped into poverty is now 37 million, an increase of 1.1 million from 2003. In the Philadelphia, the number increased so dramatically, that the city jumped from 11th- to ninth-poorest in the nation. The White House says it's not surprised by the numbers.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
DURING A crowded launch of Mayor Nutter's new anti-poverty initiative yesterday at the Free Library, someone observed, "It costs a lot to be poor. " And that, among the many dispiriting facts and helpful observations uttered yesterday, might be the most meaningful. Poverty extracts a huge price tag from individuals - in health, well-being, future potential and general living conditions, to name just a few. But poverty also extracts a high price from all of us in the city. Some of those costs can be measured specifically, like the nearly $300 million that the city spends for "health and opportunity," which includes public health and housing (but not the library, or parks and rec)
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By MICHAEL B. KATZ
Jack Kemp, chosen to head the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Bush administration, proposes to launch a new War on Poverty. Will he succeed any better than Lyndon Johnson, who officially began the last one in 1964? What lessons should he learn? According to many current assessments, during the years from 1964 until 1972-73, when federal social benefits in real dollars peaked, Washington threw massive amounts of money into a futile attempt to eliminate poverty.
NEWS
January 5, 2009 | By MARGY WALLER
LONG before the onset of the current economic slide, some Washington insiders called on government to set a goal of reducing poverty. While recognizing the good intentions, we must acknowledge what the recent election proves: Changes in our nation in the years since citizens heard a similar plea - more than 40 years ago - require a new vision for the economy. Any effort to revive a policy and political focus targeted specifically on the poor will demand significant energy and resources and, unfortunately, can't yield the desired policy results.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By CRAIG SNYDER
Notwithstanding the tortured and intrigue-filled path by which we have arrived here, Philadelphia's voters now have a choice of mayoral candidates that is well above average. Joe Egan and Ed Rendell are bright and serious people who are actually talking about bold ideas and policy choices needed to govern a city that has teetered on the brink of financial collapse. The fact is, however, that if Philadelphia is to stem its decline, far more is required than to solve the budget crisis.
NEWS
October 18, 2007
IAPPLAUD Mark Hughes for focusing on the compelling challenges we face in Philadelphia. I only wish he'd made the acquaintance of Dr. Ala Stanford Frey at Temple University before declaring in his Oct. 15 op-ed that poverty in Philadelphia is not fixable. Dr. Frey was born to a teenage single mom in North Philadelphia. She applied herself and went on to medical school after participating in the Fattah Higher Education Conference, which has affected more than 10,000 disadvantaged young people.
NEWS
June 28, 2007
AT THE press conference that launched Safe and Sound's Children's Report Card, Pat de Carlo of the Norris Square Civic Association said, "Make no mistake: This is about poverty. Until we solve the problem of poverty, none of the issues that are being addressed here will disappear. " She is right, and, in fact, the Report Card shows a huge increase in poverty. While I agree with the Daily News that we need to look carefully at all programs that serve the city's children, all the scrutiny in the world won't create jobs for the parents, or build houses for the families, or provide the mental-health services so crucial to solving the issues of abuse and neglect.
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | BY CAL THOMAS
America seems to be locked in an unwinnable debate over who or what is responsible for poverty. Conservatives blame the welfare programs of the Great Society. Liberals blame the Reagan-Bush years which they believe have gutted programs that were working. Is there a third way? Can't we all "get along," in the words of Rodney King? It should be stipulated that there are some people who are, and will forever remain, poor. These are the impoverished in spirit. Their list of addictions, whatever else it includes, is topped by a lack of initiative.
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NEWS
July 10, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE CITY yesterday opened six BenePhilly Centers to assist low-income Philadelphians who are eligible for benefits but are not receiving them. Increasing benefits access is a major goal of Shared Prosperity, an anti-poverty plan that Mayor Nutter unveiled last year. He tasked Eva Gladstein, executive director of the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity, with creating and implementing the plan. The centers, Gladstein said, will help people "get benefits that can help alleviate some of the worst effects of poverty.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Dr. Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
"The ultimate test of a moral society is the kind of world that it leaves to its children. " - Theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer It's spring, and once again I find myself sitting on my back porch gazing at the disparities on the two sides of our modest backyard. On the sunny side, a dozen varieties of flowers blossom in a colorful collage of reds, blues and whites, attracting honeybees and even hummingbirds. On the shady side, the ground is hard, the grass grows poorly, and the colors are bland.
NEWS
June 19, 2014
THE ILLUSTRATED graphic that the School District of Philadelphia is distributing, which depicts in simple terms what will happen without additional money, is ingeniously simple - and a mark of how desperate the district truly must be. The drawings are what you might find in a book for fourth-graders - simple, yet perhaps right on the mark in terms of addressing the comprehension levels of its audience, which is lawmakers at both the city and state...
NEWS
May 30, 2014
I WANT to commend the Daily News and its partners for the recent series on poverty in Philadelphia. As your articles indicated, addressing this issue is an absolute necessity for the city if we want to build a better civic future. Philadelphians know from experience that finances are still tight and everyone is trying to do more with less. Leaders of the public sector and philanthropic community must ensure that we make informed investments in organizations that directly serve the poor.
NEWS
May 28, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The racks and shelves at By Brazil, a shop tucked onto Castor Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia, overflow with yellow-and-green hats, horns, flags, stickers, and soccer jerseys. But roughly three weeks from the opening game of the FIFA World Cup in Sao Paulo, Brazil, owner Lindolfo Neto was glum. "How are we going to spend millions building stadiums, and our people don't have hospitals or schools?" he asked. "I'm not excited for the World Cup in Brazil. " What should be a time of passion and excitement for Brazilians in the Philadelphia area has been tempered, they say, by the civil unrest in their homeland over the billions of taxpayer dollars being spent on the most expensive World Cup in history.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
YOUR REPORT on poverty left me with more questions than answers, particularly the interview with Angela Pote. Where did she receive her bachelor's degree, which would be required before entering a master's program? Who paid for her bachelor's degree and who is paying for her master's degree? Why did she have six children - this is the 21st century, not the 19th. What happened to her husband, and why isn't he providing any support? If she can't understand how to use the resources that are available as she states in the article, how does she comprehend the difficult course work to become a neuropsychologist?
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
NOTICEABLY ABSENT from a news conference held yesterday by the Philadelphia Community of Leaders - a nonprofit group of black citizens dedicated to addressing poverty in Philadelphia - were any black politicians. And there's a good reason for that, according to Rahim Islam Sr., head of the Philadelphia Community of Leaders (PCOL). "We need a long-term plan and unfortunately politicians have a short-term window, you know, two years or four years," said Islam, an official with the local chapter of the NAACP and president and CEO of Universal Companies.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A coalition of about 20 African American community activists announced plans Friday to develop an agenda for reducing poverty in Philadelphia's black community. Known collectively as the Philadelphia Community of Leaders, the group said during a news conference at Laborers District Council headquarters that it planned to address the difficult issue of poverty by focusing on improving education and economic development and reducing violence. The nonprofit group, which includes developers Kenny Gamble and Rahim Islam, lawyer George Burrell, antiviolence activist Bilal Qayyum, and former School Reform Commission Chairwoman Sandra Dungee Glenn, also announced it would host its first community conference at 8:30 a.m. Saturday at Universal Audenried High School, 3301 Tasker St. The event, which is open to the public, will allow members to present their issues and goals and engage members of the community, Islam said.
NEWS
May 16, 2014
THE RISE in poverty and its attendant problems is all the worse because of the shredding of the social safety net, but Philadelphia has a powerful safety net. Ours is a net woven by stalwarts: People who have been in the city for decades working to help people get food, shelter, legal representation and more. Some of the familiar names: Jonathan Stein, Sharon Easterling, Irv Ackelsberg, Alba Martinez, Steve Honeyman, Sandra Dungee Glenn, Carol Tracy, Richard Weishaupt, Steve Gold, Janet Stotland, Lance Haver, Michael DiBerardinis.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY SANDRA SHEA, Daily News Staff Writer sheas@phillynews.com, 215-854-5886
PHILADELPHIANS have strong opinions about the issues facing Philadelphia as well as poverty's causes and solutions. With support from Temple University's Center for Public Interest Journalism, we commissioned a citywide survey from the Insight and Survey Center, a survey-research unit associated with the School of Journalism of the University of Missouri-Columbia and the Reynolds Journalism Institute. Nearly 350 randomly selected people from across the city were phoned. The results of this survey demonstrate that an economically, racially and educationally diverse cross-section of Philadelphians see poverty as one of the most important issues that the city must address to move forward.
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