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Poverty

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NEWS
May 9, 2015 | Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Around 400 people - many of them homeless - crowded into the Broad Street Ministry early Thursday evening to hear the mayoral candidates talk about poverty. But as the setting sun blasted through the old church's stained glass, the fragmented, colored light revealed a startling truth up on the stage: Just two of the seven candidates had shown up, Democrat James F. Kenney and the only Republican running, Melissa Murray Bailey. Herself aglow with sunlight and anger, Sister Mary Scullion, president and executive director of the anti-homelessness nonprofit Project HOME, stood in front of the church with her hands on her hips and let people hear her pique.
NEWS
August 31, 2005
AS PRESIDENT Bush's approval ratings continue to slide, his allies have begun to grumble. The economy is improving. Why isn't the president getting the credit? Here's a clue: According to new Census Bureau figures, the number of Americans who slipped into poverty is now 37 million, an increase of 1.1 million from 2003. In the Philadelphia, the number increased so dramatically, that the city jumped from 11th- to ninth-poorest in the nation. The White House says it's not surprised by the numbers.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
DURING A crowded launch of Mayor Nutter's new anti-poverty initiative yesterday at the Free Library, someone observed, "It costs a lot to be poor. " And that, among the many dispiriting facts and helpful observations uttered yesterday, might be the most meaningful. Poverty extracts a huge price tag from individuals - in health, well-being, future potential and general living conditions, to name just a few. But poverty also extracts a high price from all of us in the city. Some of those costs can be measured specifically, like the nearly $300 million that the city spends for "health and opportunity," which includes public health and housing (but not the library, or parks and rec)
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By MICHAEL B. KATZ
Jack Kemp, chosen to head the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Bush administration, proposes to launch a new War on Poverty. Will he succeed any better than Lyndon Johnson, who officially began the last one in 1964? What lessons should he learn? According to many current assessments, during the years from 1964 until 1972-73, when federal social benefits in real dollars peaked, Washington threw massive amounts of money into a futile attempt to eliminate poverty.
NEWS
January 5, 2009 | By MARGY WALLER
LONG before the onset of the current economic slide, some Washington insiders called on government to set a goal of reducing poverty. While recognizing the good intentions, we must acknowledge what the recent election proves: Changes in our nation in the years since citizens heard a similar plea - more than 40 years ago - require a new vision for the economy. Any effort to revive a policy and political focus targeted specifically on the poor will demand significant energy and resources and, unfortunately, can't yield the desired policy results.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By CRAIG SNYDER
Notwithstanding the tortured and intrigue-filled path by which we have arrived here, Philadelphia's voters now have a choice of mayoral candidates that is well above average. Joe Egan and Ed Rendell are bright and serious people who are actually talking about bold ideas and policy choices needed to govern a city that has teetered on the brink of financial collapse. The fact is, however, that if Philadelphia is to stem its decline, far more is required than to solve the budget crisis.
NEWS
October 18, 2007
IAPPLAUD Mark Hughes for focusing on the compelling challenges we face in Philadelphia. I only wish he'd made the acquaintance of Dr. Ala Stanford Frey at Temple University before declaring in his Oct. 15 op-ed that poverty in Philadelphia is not fixable. Dr. Frey was born to a teenage single mom in North Philadelphia. She applied herself and went on to medical school after participating in the Fattah Higher Education Conference, which has affected more than 10,000 disadvantaged young people.
NEWS
June 28, 2007
AT THE press conference that launched Safe and Sound's Children's Report Card, Pat de Carlo of the Norris Square Civic Association said, "Make no mistake: This is about poverty. Until we solve the problem of poverty, none of the issues that are being addressed here will disappear. " She is right, and, in fact, the Report Card shows a huge increase in poverty. While I agree with the Daily News that we need to look carefully at all programs that serve the city's children, all the scrutiny in the world won't create jobs for the parents, or build houses for the families, or provide the mental-health services so crucial to solving the issues of abuse and neglect.
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | BY CAL THOMAS
America seems to be locked in an unwinnable debate over who or what is responsible for poverty. Conservatives blame the welfare programs of the Great Society. Liberals blame the Reagan-Bush years which they believe have gutted programs that were working. Is there a third way? Can't we all "get along," in the words of Rodney King? It should be stipulated that there are some people who are, and will forever remain, poor. These are the impoverished in spirit. Their list of addictions, whatever else it includes, is topped by a lack of initiative.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAWTUCKET, R.I. - The door was open, and Bianca Perry stepped into the vacant room that had changed her life. The bed was made. The dresser emptied. Brother Michael had always promised a place for her in the large residence next to St. Joseph's Church in Pawtucket. A few of her belongings remained untouched last week, long after Perry had departed for college in Philadelphia and broken her family's cycle of despair. The scars are etched into her soul: Three hungry siblings trying to boil a raw potato while their stoned mother locked herself in a room.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | John Baer, Daily News Political Columnist
THE MAYOR'S race keeps drawing Zzzzs; today we offer Yyyys. Why have six Democratic candidates for an open seat in a Democratic city been unable to generate voter enthusiasm? Pollsters could actually change one choice from "undecided" to "uninterested" and run up a pretty big number. Why is turnout likely to be lower than in the last three open-seat primaries? (It was 49 percent in 1991 when Ed Rendell won a four-way race; 35 percent in '99 when John Street won a six-way; 33 percent in '07 when Michael Nutter won a five-way.)
NEWS
May 9, 2015 | Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Around 400 people - many of them homeless - crowded into the Broad Street Ministry early Thursday evening to hear the mayoral candidates talk about poverty. But as the setting sun blasted through the old church's stained glass, the fragmented, colored light revealed a startling truth up on the stage: Just two of the seven candidates had shown up, Democrat James F. Kenney and the only Republican running, Melissa Murray Bailey. Herself aglow with sunlight and anger, Sister Mary Scullion, president and executive director of the anti-homelessness nonprofit Project HOME, stood in front of the church with her hands on her hips and let people hear her pique.
NEWS
May 1, 2015
MY 14-year-old daughter asked me recently if we are poor. "Your dad and I aren't poor, but you are because we have all the money," I jokingly responded. It was an intentionally light moment during a heavy conversation about poverty in America. I seized the opportunity - as rare as it comes with a teenager - to elicit her thoughts on poverty and, in particular, on a new law in Kansas that prevents families that receive government aid from using the money to go to the movies or a swimming pool.
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For first-year Temple nursing students, a recent classroom session on how to cover rent, child care, food, medicine, and transportation on a bare-bones budget was an academic exercise. But for many of their patients, that simulation symbolizes brutal reality. In Philadelphia, a staggering 28 percent of residents live in poverty. For many, deprivation also means a life of poor health. Without decent housing, access to medical care, healthful food, and safe exercise outlets - and with the stress that comes with deprivation - the poor face major hurdles to getting and staying well.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The criticism that the city election has been too focused on funding public schools underestimates the impact of a poorly educated population on other issues, especially poverty. It is true, however, that better schools won't immediately make the poor wealthy. So what else the mayoral candidates would do to end Philadelphia's reign as America's poorest big city is important. The candidates' answers to that question on today's op-ed page often state the obvious: The city needs more jobs.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput is expected to tour city shelters, soup kitchens, food pantries, and health clinics Monday to draw attention to the issues of homelessness and hunger in advance of Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia in the fall. The tour, in which the archbishop will be joined by civic and business leaders from across the region, will be dubbed the Óscar Romero Day of Commitment, after a former archbishop of San Salvador known for his dedication to bettering conditions for the poor in his country, the archdiocese said Sunday.
NEWS
March 6, 2015
ISSUE | UKRAINE Shining a light Thanks are again due to Trudy Rubin for her reporting on Russia's use of military force in Eastern Ukraine, with the goal of destabilizing and eventually seizing control of the country, and for Rubin's accurate depiction of how dangerous Russian leader Vladimir Putin really is ("Death of Moscow ideals," March 1). By presenting these inconvenient truths, Rubin's commentary educates the public and exerts pressure on Western political leaders to respond appropriately.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
When Philadelphia's next mayor takes the oath of office inside the glittering Academy of Music, he or she should have a plan to help the city residents who cannot afford to attend a concert, don't have enough food to eat, and do not expect life to get better for them or their children. The next mayor will lead the poorest among the nation's 10 biggest cities. More than a quarter of its 1.5 million residents live in poverty. Thirty-nine percent of its children are poor. There are programs to help, but too many people don't know they qualify.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
"It is a time . . . when want is keenly felt, and abundance rejoices. " - A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens Despite biblical assurances on the awful staying power of poverty, Mayor Nutter deserves credit for launching a high-profile effort to whittle away at the number of poor living in Philadelphia. With poverty clouding the future prospects for one in four Philadelphians - many of them children - parts of the city might offer reminders of Dickensian London, but for the fact of a robust social safety net (not to mention modern sanitation methods)
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