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Poverty

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NEWS
August 31, 2005
AS PRESIDENT Bush's approval ratings continue to slide, his allies have begun to grumble. The economy is improving. Why isn't the president getting the credit? Here's a clue: According to new Census Bureau figures, the number of Americans who slipped into poverty is now 37 million, an increase of 1.1 million from 2003. In the Philadelphia, the number increased so dramatically, that the city jumped from 11th- to ninth-poorest in the nation. The White House says it's not surprised by the numbers.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
DURING A crowded launch of Mayor Nutter's new anti-poverty initiative yesterday at the Free Library, someone observed, "It costs a lot to be poor. " And that, among the many dispiriting facts and helpful observations uttered yesterday, might be the most meaningful. Poverty extracts a huge price tag from individuals - in health, well-being, future potential and general living conditions, to name just a few. But poverty also extracts a high price from all of us in the city. Some of those costs can be measured specifically, like the nearly $300 million that the city spends for "health and opportunity," which includes public health and housing (but not the library, or parks and rec)
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By MICHAEL B. KATZ
Jack Kemp, chosen to head the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Bush administration, proposes to launch a new War on Poverty. Will he succeed any better than Lyndon Johnson, who officially began the last one in 1964? What lessons should he learn? According to many current assessments, during the years from 1964 until 1972-73, when federal social benefits in real dollars peaked, Washington threw massive amounts of money into a futile attempt to eliminate poverty.
NEWS
January 5, 2009 | By MARGY WALLER
LONG before the onset of the current economic slide, some Washington insiders called on government to set a goal of reducing poverty. While recognizing the good intentions, we must acknowledge what the recent election proves: Changes in our nation in the years since citizens heard a similar plea - more than 40 years ago - require a new vision for the economy. Any effort to revive a policy and political focus targeted specifically on the poor will demand significant energy and resources and, unfortunately, can't yield the desired policy results.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By CRAIG SNYDER
Notwithstanding the tortured and intrigue-filled path by which we have arrived here, Philadelphia's voters now have a choice of mayoral candidates that is well above average. Joe Egan and Ed Rendell are bright and serious people who are actually talking about bold ideas and policy choices needed to govern a city that has teetered on the brink of financial collapse. The fact is, however, that if Philadelphia is to stem its decline, far more is required than to solve the budget crisis.
NEWS
October 18, 2007
IAPPLAUD Mark Hughes for focusing on the compelling challenges we face in Philadelphia. I only wish he'd made the acquaintance of Dr. Ala Stanford Frey at Temple University before declaring in his Oct. 15 op-ed that poverty in Philadelphia is not fixable. Dr. Frey was born to a teenage single mom in North Philadelphia. She applied herself and went on to medical school after participating in the Fattah Higher Education Conference, which has affected more than 10,000 disadvantaged young people.
NEWS
June 28, 2007
AT THE press conference that launched Safe and Sound's Children's Report Card, Pat de Carlo of the Norris Square Civic Association said, "Make no mistake: This is about poverty. Until we solve the problem of poverty, none of the issues that are being addressed here will disappear. " She is right, and, in fact, the Report Card shows a huge increase in poverty. While I agree with the Daily News that we need to look carefully at all programs that serve the city's children, all the scrutiny in the world won't create jobs for the parents, or build houses for the families, or provide the mental-health services so crucial to solving the issues of abuse and neglect.
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | BY CAL THOMAS
America seems to be locked in an unwinnable debate over who or what is responsible for poverty. Conservatives blame the welfare programs of the Great Society. Liberals blame the Reagan-Bush years which they believe have gutted programs that were working. Is there a third way? Can't we all "get along," in the words of Rodney King? It should be stipulated that there are some people who are, and will forever remain, poor. These are the impoverished in spirit. Their list of addictions, whatever else it includes, is topped by a lack of initiative.
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | By Donald Kimelman, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
You wouldn't know it from watching the presidential debates, but the War on Poverty may be about to resume. Not the all-out war envisioned by President Lyndon Johnson, but something more akin to a guerrilla war: concentrating resources on the most promising targets. Anyone who doubts that attacking poverty is back on the national agenda should have been in Williamsburg, Va., last week for the Democratic Leadership Council's (DLC) second annual conference. The first thing to understand about the DLC is that it was formed by a group of white, centrist Democratic leaders to move the party away from its heavy identification with the poor and minorities.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | Solomon Jones
I AM NOT Catholic, but I understand the significance of the upcoming papal visit. In short, the presence of Pope Francis, a man who has placed poverty at the center of his papacy, will put the world's eyes squarely on our city. The world will see the brick tower of Independence Hall standing tall against a cloud-speckled sky. The world will view the architecture of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and be moved by the classical strains of the Philadelphia Orchestra. The world will see the opulence of City Hall, with William Penn gazing down on the city for which he prayed.
FOOD
June 12, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some recipes are sacrosanct, passed down on stained and creased index cards from one generation to the next. If you grew up on soul food, like Dejenaba Gordon did, collard greens is among them. "I've only known one way to cook collard greens: Boil it for hours with turkey or pork," she said. But last week, she stood up in front of a capacity crowd at the Free Library's Culinary Literacy Center and proposed something radical: Quickly saute the greens with caramelized onions, olive oil, and Dijon mustard, a compromise that preserves the nutrition and cuts out the saturated fat. The point wasn't to break with tradition, but to embrace it - while rethinking familiar flavors and ingredients in the context of 21st-century nutrition concerns.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
MAYOR NUTTER, city officials and early education advocates yesterday unveiled an ambitious plan aimed at making sure all Philadelphia children from birth to age 5 are ready to start school. The plan, titled "A Running Start Philadelphia," looks at ways to increase the number of high-quality child-care providers and expand opportunities so more families with young children can access them. Officials said the plan is critical to helping the city reduce poverty and build a stronger workforce.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration on Tuesday laid out an ambitious vision for assuring that all children in Philadelphia benefit from high-quality early learning experiences. Labeled "A Running Start Philadelphia: For Every Child, Birth to Five," the outline offers guidance on how the city can guarantee the best learning opportunities for its youngest citizens as a way to offset the long-term, systemic poverty in some neighborhoods. "With this plan, Philadelphia has developed a strategy to support its children and families by building stronger schools to create a more competitive workforce," Nutter said.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | Dan Spinelli, Daily News Staff Writer
AFTER A RESOUNDING win in the Democratic mayoral primary, Jim Kenney mingled with Gov. Wolf, Republican challenger Melissa Murray Bailey and area homeless. Kenney joined a mishmash of political elites and poverty-stricken locals at a luncheon and fundraiser at Broad Street Ministry, in Center City. The luncheon, which was free to attend, was Kenney's and Bailey's first postprimary election event. BSM board co-chairman Richard Keaveney praised Kenney for celebrating his primary victory with a fundraiser instead of a ritzy lunch.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | BY DOYLE McMANUS
  AN IMPORTANT but often neglected debate broke out in Washington last week: Which political party can do more for the nation's poor? The occasion was a conference at Georgetown University on how religious groups can alleviate poverty. It turned into an opportunity for a spirited exchange between a leading thinker in the Republican Party's reform camp, Arthur C. Brooks, of the American Enterprise Institute, and a noted leader in the Democratic Party, President Obama. In little more than an hour, Obama and Brooks succeeded in identifying a few encouraging points of common ground between the two parties - among people of good will, at least.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAWTUCKET, R.I. - The door was open, and Bianca Perry stepped into the vacant room that had changed her life. The bed was made. The dresser emptied. Brother Michael had always promised a place for her in the large residence next to St. Joseph's Church in Pawtucket. A few of her belongings remained untouched last week, long after Perry had departed for college in Philadelphia and broken her family's cycle of despair. The scars are etched into her soul: Three hungry siblings trying to boil a raw potato while their stoned mother locked herself in a room.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | John Baer, Daily News Political Columnist
THE MAYOR'S race keeps drawing Zzzzs; today we offer Yyyys. Why have six Democratic candidates for an open seat in a Democratic city been unable to generate voter enthusiasm? Pollsters could actually change one choice from "undecided" to "uninterested" and run up a pretty big number. Why is turnout likely to be lower than in the last three open-seat primaries? (It was 49 percent in 1991 when Ed Rendell won a four-way race; 35 percent in '99 when John Street won a six-way; 33 percent in '07 when Michael Nutter won a five-way.)
NEWS
May 9, 2015 | Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Around 400 people - many of them homeless - crowded into the Broad Street Ministry early Thursday evening to hear the mayoral candidates talk about poverty. But as the setting sun blasted through the old church's stained glass, the fragmented, colored light revealed a startling truth up on the stage: Just two of the seven candidates had shown up, Democrat James F. Kenney and the only Republican running, Melissa Murray Bailey. Herself aglow with sunlight and anger, Sister Mary Scullion, president and executive director of the anti-homelessness nonprofit Project HOME, stood in front of the church with her hands on her hips and let people hear her pique.
NEWS
May 1, 2015
MY 14-year-old daughter asked me recently if we are poor. "Your dad and I aren't poor, but you are because we have all the money," I jokingly responded. It was an intentionally light moment during a heavy conversation about poverty in America. I seized the opportunity - as rare as it comes with a teenager - to elicit her thoughts on poverty and, in particular, on a new law in Kansas that prevents families that receive government aid from using the money to go to the movies or a swimming pool.
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