CollectionsPoverty
IN THE NEWS

Poverty

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 31, 2005
AS PRESIDENT Bush's approval ratings continue to slide, his allies have begun to grumble. The economy is improving. Why isn't the president getting the credit? Here's a clue: According to new Census Bureau figures, the number of Americans who slipped into poverty is now 37 million, an increase of 1.1 million from 2003. In the Philadelphia, the number increased so dramatically, that the city jumped from 11th- to ninth-poorest in the nation. The White House says it's not surprised by the numbers.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
DURING A crowded launch of Mayor Nutter's new anti-poverty initiative yesterday at the Free Library, someone observed, "It costs a lot to be poor. " And that, among the many dispiriting facts and helpful observations uttered yesterday, might be the most meaningful. Poverty extracts a huge price tag from individuals - in health, well-being, future potential and general living conditions, to name just a few. But poverty also extracts a high price from all of us in the city. Some of those costs can be measured specifically, like the nearly $300 million that the city spends for "health and opportunity," which includes public health and housing (but not the library, or parks and rec)
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By MICHAEL B. KATZ
Jack Kemp, chosen to head the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Bush administration, proposes to launch a new War on Poverty. Will he succeed any better than Lyndon Johnson, who officially began the last one in 1964? What lessons should he learn? According to many current assessments, during the years from 1964 until 1972-73, when federal social benefits in real dollars peaked, Washington threw massive amounts of money into a futile attempt to eliminate poverty.
NEWS
January 5, 2009 | By MARGY WALLER
LONG before the onset of the current economic slide, some Washington insiders called on government to set a goal of reducing poverty. While recognizing the good intentions, we must acknowledge what the recent election proves: Changes in our nation in the years since citizens heard a similar plea - more than 40 years ago - require a new vision for the economy. Any effort to revive a policy and political focus targeted specifically on the poor will demand significant energy and resources and, unfortunately, can't yield the desired policy results.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By CRAIG SNYDER
Notwithstanding the tortured and intrigue-filled path by which we have arrived here, Philadelphia's voters now have a choice of mayoral candidates that is well above average. Joe Egan and Ed Rendell are bright and serious people who are actually talking about bold ideas and policy choices needed to govern a city that has teetered on the brink of financial collapse. The fact is, however, that if Philadelphia is to stem its decline, far more is required than to solve the budget crisis.
NEWS
October 18, 2007
IAPPLAUD Mark Hughes for focusing on the compelling challenges we face in Philadelphia. I only wish he'd made the acquaintance of Dr. Ala Stanford Frey at Temple University before declaring in his Oct. 15 op-ed that poverty in Philadelphia is not fixable. Dr. Frey was born to a teenage single mom in North Philadelphia. She applied herself and went on to medical school after participating in the Fattah Higher Education Conference, which has affected more than 10,000 disadvantaged young people.
NEWS
June 28, 2007
AT THE press conference that launched Safe and Sound's Children's Report Card, Pat de Carlo of the Norris Square Civic Association said, "Make no mistake: This is about poverty. Until we solve the problem of poverty, none of the issues that are being addressed here will disappear. " She is right, and, in fact, the Report Card shows a huge increase in poverty. While I agree with the Daily News that we need to look carefully at all programs that serve the city's children, all the scrutiny in the world won't create jobs for the parents, or build houses for the families, or provide the mental-health services so crucial to solving the issues of abuse and neglect.
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | BY CAL THOMAS
America seems to be locked in an unwinnable debate over who or what is responsible for poverty. Conservatives blame the welfare programs of the Great Society. Liberals blame the Reagan-Bush years which they believe have gutted programs that were working. Is there a third way? Can't we all "get along," in the words of Rodney King? It should be stipulated that there are some people who are, and will forever remain, poor. These are the impoverished in spirit. Their list of addictions, whatever else it includes, is topped by a lack of initiative.
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | By Donald Kimelman, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
You wouldn't know it from watching the presidential debates, but the War on Poverty may be about to resume. Not the all-out war envisioned by President Lyndon Johnson, but something more akin to a guerrilla war: concentrating resources on the most promising targets. Anyone who doubts that attacking poverty is back on the national agenda should have been in Williamsburg, Va., last week for the Democratic Leadership Council's (DLC) second annual conference. The first thing to understand about the DLC is that it was formed by a group of white, centrist Democratic leaders to move the party away from its heavy identification with the poor and minorities.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THERE WERE many news accounts that referred to the latest round of food-stamp reductions out of Washington as only "small cuts. " Don't tell that to Frankford mom Tianna Gaines-Turner when she goes grocery shopping for her family, including her husband and three kids. Gaines-Turner - who's currently out of work from her seasonal rec job and whose husband is only getting part-time hours in food service - said her family already took a hit of roughly $70 a month when the government slashed the food-stamp program last year, and now she's bracing for the impact of the 2014 cuts.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Often highly skilled and high-achieving, Asian immigrants are frequently portrayed as America's "model minorities" - cliched as hardworking green grocers, or math-whiz entrepreneurs from the Far East. But a new report on Asian Americans in Philadelphia released Wednesday challenges the stereotypes with a complex portrait of a community composed of more than two dozen countries of origin and mixed levels of attainment. Disaggregating Asians by their ethnicities, the report finds pockets of poverty, gaps in education, trouble securing affordable housing and other critical needs.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA A charitable fund used primarily to buy heating oil for poor elderly Philadelphians may be out of money within a week. "It's very dire," said Holly Lange, president and CEO of the Philadelphia Corp. for Aging (PCA), which administers the Emergency Fund for Older Philadelphians on behalf of a coalition of 22 social-service agencies. The fund is considered a service of last resort - the safety net beneath all other safety nets - because people can receive payments from it only if they have already exhausted government programs that provide energy assistance.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fifty years and one day after President Lyndon B. Johnson declared war on poverty, LeBaron Harvey was slicing strawberries last week in Cathedral Kitchen, a Camden nonprofit that feeds the poor. Growing up in Camden, Harvey, 32, said he was kept alive by the food-stamp program, greatly expanded under Johnson's initiatives. Harvey learned to be a chef at Cathedral; he hopes to open an Asian/soul-food restaurant. "In the projects I come from, food stamps were a main means of income," said Harvey, quick and efficient with the knife that's become his weapon of choice in LBJ's endless war. "After my [janitor]
NEWS
January 11, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
MANTUA President Obama pointed to one of Philadelphia's most depressing statistics - nearly four in 10 children live below the poverty line - as one of the main reasons the city's Mantua section was chosen as one of the nation's first five Promise Zones. The president officially announced Thursday that West Philadelphia, in particular the Mantua neighborhood, would receive federal help from the new Promise Zones program, aimed at cutting unemployment, poverty, and crime, enhancing education, and attracting private-sector investment and jobs.
NEWS
January 3, 2014
WITH THE new year just beginning, we hope these items of unfinished business from 2013 get the attention they deserve. Money for Education: Despite all that was said and written about the financial plight of Philadelphia's public schools, little was actually done to solve the district's fundamental problem: it lacks the necessary money to do even the basics. The district started the year hundreds of millions of dollars in the red. Despite thousands of layoffs and wrenching cutbacks in staff and programs in every school, it will end it the school year hundreds of millions in the red. In Philadelphia, the situation is desperate.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Poverty has increased a startling 62 percent in the communities of Lower Northeast Philadelphia since 1999. At the same time, poverty increased 42 percent in Roxborough and Manayunk, while declining 13 percent in South Philadelphia. Those findings come from an Inquirer comparison of 2000 census figures with new data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. The new federal data were contained in the American Community Survey (ACS), a compilation of information collected from 24.5 million people nationwide between 2008 to 2012.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol Seaton lives beside the Brandywine River in the genteel precincts of southern Chester County. On crisp and icy days, "it looks like a Currier and Ives painting around me," said Seaton, referencing the iconic 19th-century winter tableaux of snorting horses pulling sleek sleds through snowy woods. But while the world around Seaton shimmers, her own life is burdened by tribulation. A frequent patron of the West Chester Food Cupboard, Seaton, 58 and widowed with no children, lives in poverty in a tiny log cabin in Pocopson Township, where the median household income is in excess of $120,000 a year.
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number of children living in poverty in Delaware County increased by 30 percent between 2008 and 2012, according to a new report. Around 21,000 children 17 and under were living in poverty in the county in 2012, according to the report by Public Citizens for Children and Youth (PCCY), a youth advocacy and research nonprofit in Philadelphia. That's a county child-poverty rate of 16.7 percent, PCCY reported. According to the agency's calculations, the Delaware County child-poverty rate is the highest among the four Pennsylvania suburban counties, PCCY officials said at a news conference in the food pantry at the Bernardine Center in Chester on Monday.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
TO PLUG budget deficits, cities raise taxes or cut services, or both. To fix potholes, they send out workers to patch the street. To prevent fires, they distribute smoke detectors and encourage safe building practices. But what can local government do about a problem like poverty? "Poverty is affected by so many international and national factors," said Eva Gladstein, executive director of the city's anti-poverty agency, the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|