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Poverty Line

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NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
More New Jersey residents lived in poverty in 2010 than ever before, according to a report released Sunday. A record 885,0000 people in the state, nearly 300,000 of them children, lived below the poverty line, say authors of an analysis by the Legal Services of New Jersey Poverty Research Institute in Edison, which is based on the most recent numbers available. Overall, the poverty rate increased from 8.7 percent in 2008 to 9.4 percent in 2009, and finally to 10.3 percent in 2010.
NEWS
December 17, 1995 | By Sally Steenland
Imagine working full-time and earning $8,890 a year. Try living on that. Imagine paying for food, rent, child care and transportation with such meager wages. Not to mention buying Christmas presents. You can't. You'd run out of money before basic expenses are paid. The problem isn't that you're lazy - you're working 40 hours a week. The problem is that you're earning minimum wage - $4.25 an hour. Millions of people who work full-time at minimum wage jobs are poor. Contrary to stereotype, the majority are neither teenagers flipping hamburgers nor wives earning pin money.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Already the poorest big city in America, Philadelphia also has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.2 percent, or nearly 185,000 people, including about 60,000 children. That's almost twice the U.S. deep-poverty rate of 6.3 percent. Camden's deep-poverty rate of 20 percent is more than three times the national mark, but its population is a fraction of Philadelphia's.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Gloucester County has joined a handful of local governments in the nation that require the companies they contract to pay wages above the federal poverty line. The freeholders last night passed the living-wage measure, 7-0. It requires companies awarded bids for county jobs to pay workers who receive medical benefits at least $8.50 an hour - the amount the federal government says the wage earner in a family of four needs to stay above the poverty line - or $10.87 without medical benefits.
NEWS
May 16, 2002 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Council gave initial approval yesterday to a second major tax-cut bill, but the legislation to give Philadelphia's poor a steep wage-tax break faces an uncertain future. The preliminary vote was a victory for Councilman David Cohen, the veteran legislator who occupies Council's left wing. Yesterday, however, Cohen sounded like a Republican supply-sider, explaining that cutting the wage tax from 4.54 to 1.5 percent for poor people would spur spending in their neighborhoods, thereby raising overall economic activity and tax revenue, and therefore not hurting city services.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. The annual salary for a single person at half the poverty line is around $5,700; for a family of four, it's around $11,700. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.9 percent, or around 200,000 people. Phoenix, Chicago, and Dallas are the nearest to Philadelphia, with deep-poverty rates of more than 10 percent. The numbers come from an examination of the 2009 through 2011 three-year estimate of the U.S. Census American Community Survey by The Inquirer and Temple University sociologist David Elesh.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Lansdale project may still be a year from completion, but people in upper Montgomery County and across the state are already bubbling about what may be its most striking and unusual feature: The front door. When North Penn Commons is finished, the door will be the lone entranceway for seemingly disparate groups: members exercising at the local YMCA, seniors living in affordable housing, and visitors to a soup kitchen, Manna on Main Street. The design is intentional, part of a bid to reach across age and economic barriers to integrate struggling older people into the community.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
ANISSA MALLORY knows what it's like to live in poverty. The 20-year-old Kensington mother of 1-year-old twins, a boy and a girl, says she and her husband "survive day-to-day," but also have to sacrifice. "It's hard to keep up with the bills and rent," she said. Although they're able to feed the kids, she and her husband will forgo buying new clothes or sneakers. Mallory, a home-health aide, says they make about $19,000 a year - including welfare. They live in north Kensington, an area of the city with the largest cluster of people living below the poverty line, according to a Daily News analysis of census estimates being released today.
NEWS
November 14, 2011
A NEW, supplemental measure of poverty released last week by the Census Bureau provided a slightly different view of just who is poor in America. But it doesn't change the reality that a shocking number of Americans are struggling to provide a decent life for themselves and their families. The federal government's traditional method of measuring poverty - and therefore its way of determining eligibility for federal safety-net programs - is dreadfully out of date. Devised in 1964, it is based on the notion (applicable at the time)
NEWS
August 13, 2011
In a Friday story on hunger in the First Congressional District, Barbie Izquierdo, a woman who was quoted, miscalculated her salary. Izquierdo, a single mother of two, is paid more than $28,000 annually, which is above the poverty line for a family of three. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Lansdale project may still be a year from completion, but people in upper Montgomery County and across the state are already bubbling about what may be its most striking and unusual feature: The front door. When North Penn Commons is finished, the door will be the lone entranceway for seemingly disparate groups: members exercising at the local YMCA, seniors living in affordable housing, and visitors to a soup kitchen, Manna on Main Street. The design is intentional, part of a bid to reach across age and economic barriers to integrate struggling older people into the community.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
LIFE ON the poverty line can mean getting some cupcakes in your stomach, even if you're dreaming of an avocado. Fresh fruit and vegetables might require a bus trip out of town or waiting until a check clears. Hitting up the corner store instead often means eating junk food. But news that Chester's brand-new supermarket, the Bottom Dollar on Edgmont Avenue near 15th Street, is closing seven months after it opened wasn't greeted with great shock by the people standing in the snow flurries with their bags Tuesday afternoon.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Already the poorest big city in America, Philadelphia also has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.2 percent, or nearly 185,000 people, including about 60,000 children. That's almost twice the U.S. deep-poverty rate of 6.3 percent. Camden's deep-poverty rate of 20 percent is more than three times the national mark, but its population is a fraction of Philadelphia's.
NEWS
May 13, 2014 | BY SANDRA SHEA, Daily News Staff Writer sheas@phillynews.com, 215-854-5886
IT WAS dusk, growing dark quickly, so when a man suddenly appeared at my car window in the parking lot of Home Depot, I instinctively moved to lock the door. But he wasn't acting like a predator. For one thing, he was elderly, and he was gesturing urgently, so I opened the door and got out. "Miss, please," he said, pointing to his mouth, which was twisted in grimace. "I'm sorry. I need help. " He spoke in halting English, so it took a while to understand what he was saying. Something like, "I need help, my family has no food.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A glitch in the Obamacare window-shopping tool that incorrectly responded "not eligible" to queries about financial help from households just above the poverty line was fixed hours after the administration learned of the issue, officials said Friday. For 35 days, Healthcare.gov used the wrong year's federal poverty-level guidelines for informal assessments of eligibility. And, while that website has been the only one empowered to make final decisions in most states, similar mistakes uncovered at independent sites raise the possibility that wrong information is still being disseminated less than 10 days before open enrollment ends for the year.
NEWS
January 29, 2014
FIFTY years ago, Lyndon Johnson used his first State of the Union address to declare a war on poverty. At that time, 19 percent of Americans lived below the poverty line. Thanks to the programs created during Johnson's war - including Medicaid, Medicare, food stamps and Head Start, among others - poverty was cut by one quarter over three years. Today, at 16 percent, the poverty rate is just three percentage points below 1964's high-water mark; the United States now has 11 million more people living in poverty than it did 50 years ago. Tonight, during his State of the Union address, President Obama is expected to deliver what many might consider a system upgrade - version 2.0 of the war on poverty.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many people smoke after they've eaten. Lindell Harvey smokes because he hasn't. "You smoke out of anxiety because you don't have the food you need," said Harvey, 54, who lives alone in Crum Lynne, Delaware County. He receives disability checks from the Navy that keep him $2,000 below the poverty line. Harvey relies on his Newports to see him through his hard days. "In my mind, the smoking becomes a comfort as I try to create ways to get food. " In lives where people endure a dearth of nearly everything important - food, jobs, medical care, a safe place to live - the poor suffer an abundance of one thing: Nicotine.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michael A. Nutter and Eva Gladstein
When we talk about poverty in Philadelphia, let's keep one basic concept in mind: We are all in this together. The effects of poverty ripple out beyond those directly affected to everyone who lives and works in this city. Poverty means fewer people have money to spend on goods and services in local businesses, and therefore fewer dollars flow through the economy. It means an increased burden on city services, and therefore a higher burden on city homeowners and taxpayers. But this isn't all about dollars and cents.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an unusually frank document, the city has laid out stark statistical descriptions of poverty in Philadelphia, accompanied by a plan to try to deal with the problem. The Shared Prosperity Philadelphia plan, presented Thursday at the Central Library of the Free Library of Philadelphia, states that at a "staggering 28 percent," the poverty rate here is the highest among the nation's 10 largest cities. More than 430,000 of the city's 1,547,600 residents live below the federal poverty line, the report points out. The poverty line ranges from $11,490 for a single person to $23,550 for a family of four.
NEWS
June 7, 2013
Seek out a modern-day Girard With Girard College planning to shut its doors to high school students and end its boarding program, the ruling Board of City Trusts should go to every Forbes 500 individual and have each walk the grounds of this magnificent school. Surely, there is another Stephen Girard - if not two or three - among today's wealthiest who might have grown up in a single-parent household and who would be willing to sustain Girard's legacy. Marjorie R. Wilhite, Philadelphia Probe before deal's court approval Orphans' Court should order an investigation of Girard College finances because Stephen Girard's money, buildings, and school are very much connected to politics in Philadelphia.
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