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Poverty Line

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NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
More New Jersey residents lived in poverty in 2010 than ever before, according to a report released Sunday. A record 885,0000 people in the state, nearly 300,000 of them children, lived below the poverty line, say authors of an analysis by the Legal Services of New Jersey Poverty Research Institute in Edison, which is based on the most recent numbers available. Overall, the poverty rate increased from 8.7 percent in 2008 to 9.4 percent in 2009, and finally to 10.3 percent in 2010.
NEWS
December 17, 1995 | By Sally Steenland
Imagine working full-time and earning $8,890 a year. Try living on that. Imagine paying for food, rent, child care and transportation with such meager wages. Not to mention buying Christmas presents. You can't. You'd run out of money before basic expenses are paid. The problem isn't that you're lazy - you're working 40 hours a week. The problem is that you're earning minimum wage - $4.25 an hour. Millions of people who work full-time at minimum wage jobs are poor. Contrary to stereotype, the majority are neither teenagers flipping hamburgers nor wives earning pin money.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Already the poorest big city in America, Philadelphia also has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.2 percent, or nearly 185,000 people, including about 60,000 children. That's almost twice the U.S. deep-poverty rate of 6.3 percent. Camden's deep-poverty rate of 20 percent is more than three times the national mark, but its population is a fraction of Philadelphia's.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Gloucester County has joined a handful of local governments in the nation that require the companies they contract to pay wages above the federal poverty line. The freeholders last night passed the living-wage measure, 7-0. It requires companies awarded bids for county jobs to pay workers who receive medical benefits at least $8.50 an hour - the amount the federal government says the wage earner in a family of four needs to stay above the poverty line - or $10.87 without medical benefits.
NEWS
May 16, 2002 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Council gave initial approval yesterday to a second major tax-cut bill, but the legislation to give Philadelphia's poor a steep wage-tax break faces an uncertain future. The preliminary vote was a victory for Councilman David Cohen, the veteran legislator who occupies Council's left wing. Yesterday, however, Cohen sounded like a Republican supply-sider, explaining that cutting the wage tax from 4.54 to 1.5 percent for poor people would spur spending in their neighborhoods, thereby raising overall economic activity and tax revenue, and therefore not hurting city services.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. The annual salary for a single person at half the poverty line is around $5,700; for a family of four, it's around $11,700. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.9 percent, or around 200,000 people. Phoenix, Chicago, and Dallas are the nearest to Philadelphia, with deep-poverty rates of more than 10 percent. The numbers come from an examination of the 2009 through 2011 three-year estimate of the U.S. Census American Community Survey by The Inquirer and Temple University sociologist David Elesh.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Lansdale project may still be a year from completion, but people in upper Montgomery County and across the state are already bubbling about what may be its most striking and unusual feature: The front door. When North Penn Commons is finished, the door will be the lone entranceway for seemingly disparate groups: members exercising at the local YMCA, seniors living in affordable housing, and visitors to a soup kitchen, Manna on Main Street. The design is intentional, part of a bid to reach across age and economic barriers to integrate struggling older people into the community.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
ANISSA MALLORY knows what it's like to live in poverty. The 20-year-old Kensington mother of 1-year-old twins, a boy and a girl, says she and her husband "survive day-to-day," but also have to sacrifice. "It's hard to keep up with the bills and rent," she said. Although they're able to feed the kids, she and her husband will forgo buying new clothes or sneakers. Mallory, a home-health aide, says they make about $19,000 a year - including welfare. They live in north Kensington, an area of the city with the largest cluster of people living below the poverty line, according to a Daily News analysis of census estimates being released today.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Several City Council members want Mayor Kenney to add an income cap to his universal prekindergarten program to ensure it benefits the city's poorest residents. "Fundamentally, I'm trying to understand why we're subsidizing people who can afford to pay for slots," Council President Darrell L. Clarke said at Tuesday's budget hearing. "It's not normally what . . . government does. " Otis Hackney, the mayor's director of education, said low-income families would have priority under Kenney's plan because the city would draw from the list of families living below 300 percent of the federal poverty line first.
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Even as poverty leveled off in New Jersey last year, it remained at a 50-year high and showed no signs of abating given persistent structural problems such as income inequality and changing employment trends that are trapping the poor, a new report has found. "New Jersey's current and long-term employment outlooks are ominous and raise the possibility that we are witnessing profound and long-term shifts in employment opportunity, potentially requiring corresponding paradigm shifts in government economic development and antipoverty strategies," reads a 146-page annual report of the Legal Services of New Jersey Poverty Research Institute.
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NEWS
April 18, 2016
ISSUE | HUMANITARIANISM Helping each other Greece is suffering a financial crisis, one-third of its people at risk of falling below the poverty line. Yet they have responded by organizing a social movement called the "Wall of Kindness" ("When a wall is not a divider," April 10). Citizens are providing food for the needy on racks lining busy streets. I am deeply touched by such a selfless endeavor and wish that those in our country who are proposing the erection of walls to shun others would take notice.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Several City Council members want Mayor Kenney to add an income cap to his universal prekindergarten program to ensure it benefits the city's poorest residents. "Fundamentally, I'm trying to understand why we're subsidizing people who can afford to pay for slots," Council President Darrell L. Clarke said at Tuesday's budget hearing. "It's not normally what . . . government does. " Otis Hackney, the mayor's director of education, said low-income families would have priority under Kenney's plan because the city would draw from the list of families living below 300 percent of the federal poverty line first.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Richard Harris, For The Inquirer
Last month, Republicans held a forum on poverty in South Carolina, the next primary state, a signal that some in the GOP don't want to cede the issue of income inequality to the Democrats. House Speaker Paul Ryan began by scolding his fellow Republicans: "We've treated poverty like [it's] potholes that need to be filled up and then we move on. " For sheer symbolism, though, there might have been no better place to hold a poverty forum than Reading. In 2011, Reading earned the dubious distinction of being America's poorest city, with the highest proportion of residents below the poverty line.
NEWS
January 6, 2016
(Trigger Warning: The following includes political opinions that make some feel uncomfortable.) THE 99TH mayor of Philadelphia was sworn in yesterday, and I wonder if James F. Kenney was thinking, "99? Geez. Why didn't I let Darrell run? Then I could have been the 100th, and that's so cool. If I get reelected now - and there's no chance of a Democratic mayor not being reelected - I am still 99, not 100. " Chances are Kenney was not thinking that. More likely he was thinking of the challenges of the next four (really eight)
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has made some strides in helping its poor over the last two years, but has a long way to go as the most deeply impoverished of the nation's 10 largest cities, according to a City Hall report released Friday. An office established two years ago to reduce poverty in the city reported that in the last year alone, a new network of benefits centers has helped connect several thousand impoverished Philadelphians with about $13 million in local, state, and federal benefits. Other measures also have yielded results since Mayor Nutter created the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity in 2013 and placed Eva Gladstein at the helm as executive director, the group reported.
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Even as poverty leveled off in New Jersey last year, it remained at a 50-year high and showed no signs of abating given persistent structural problems such as income inequality and changing employment trends that are trapping the poor, a new report has found. "New Jersey's current and long-term employment outlooks are ominous and raise the possibility that we are witnessing profound and long-term shifts in employment opportunity, potentially requiring corresponding paradigm shifts in government economic development and antipoverty strategies," reads a 146-page annual report of the Legal Services of New Jersey Poverty Research Institute.
NEWS
October 16, 2015
ALTHOUGH THE shelves in my home office are packed with books by financial experts offering really good advice, it was my grandmother Big Mama who taught me most of what I know about handling money. And she did it while living below the poverty line. To this day, I marvel at how Big Mama raised five grandchildren on her tiny salary. Pride and frustration with the welfare system made her refuse monetary assistance from the state. At times we may not have had enough for seconds during meals, but we never went hungry.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia remained the poorest of America's 10 largest cities in 2014, with more than one quarter of its residents - 26 percent - living below the poverty line. At the same time, Camden recorded a seemingly significant drop in poverty in 2014 from 42.6 percent to 36.5 percent - a change experts had a hard time explaining. Both findings were mined from the massive data trove known as the American Community Survey 1-Year Estimate, a product of the U.S. Census Bureau, set to officially be released Thursday.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Lansdale project may still be a year from completion, but people in upper Montgomery County and across the state are already bubbling about what may be its most striking and unusual feature: The front door. When North Penn Commons is finished, the door will be the lone entranceway for seemingly disparate groups: members exercising at the local YMCA, seniors living in affordable housing, and visitors to a soup kitchen, Manna on Main Street. The design is intentional, part of a bid to reach across age and economic barriers to integrate struggling older people into the community.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
LIFE ON the poverty line can mean getting some cupcakes in your stomach, even if you're dreaming of an avocado. Fresh fruit and vegetables might require a bus trip out of town or waiting until a check clears. Hitting up the corner store instead often means eating junk food. But news that Chester's brand-new supermarket, the Bottom Dollar on Edgmont Avenue near 15th Street, is closing seven months after it opened wasn't greeted with great shock by the people standing in the snow flurries with their bags Tuesday afternoon.
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