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Poverty Rate

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NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Latinos have the highest rate of poverty of any racial or ethnic group in Philadelphia. In the city, 44 percent of Latinos live in poverty - twice the national rate of 23.5 percent. The overall Philadelphia poverty rate is 26.3 percent. Latino poverty prevails throughout most of the region as well, both in the Pennsylvania suburbs and in South Jersey. In six of the eight counties in the region - Bucks and Chester Counties being the exceptions - Latinos have the highest poverty rate of all groups.
NEWS
October 7, 1994 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In yet another sign that many Americans remain shut out from a growing economy, the Census Bureau reported yesterday that the poverty rate rose last year to its highest level in 10 years. There were 39.3 million poor Americans in 1993, or 15.1 percent of the population. Although that marked only a slight change from a poverty rate of 14.8 percent in 1992, the increase came at a time of economic expansion. The poverty rate in 1983 was 15.2 percent. The poverty level for a family of four was $14,763 in 1993.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | By Ken Moritsugu, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Demonstrating the power of a strong economy to help the poor, the nation's poverty rate fell in 1999 to its lowest level in two decades, the Census Bureau reported yesterday. Last year 32.3 million people lived in poverty, which the government defines as a maximum annual income of $8,501 for a single person and $17,029 for a family of four. That is 11.8 percent of the nation's 273.5 million people, down from 12.7 percent, or 34.5 million people, in 1998. More than 80 percent of the decline nationwide occurred in "central cities," the urban cores of metropolitan regions.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number of people living in poverty in America last year remained stalled at the same record high level as in 2010, newly released government figures show. In addition, real median household income declined by 1.5 percent between 2010 and 2011 to $50,054. At the same time, the number of people without health-insurance coverage fell from 50 million to 48.6 million during the year. The figures, released Wednesday, come from a U.S. Census Bureau report. According to the report, 46.2 million Americans were living in poverty in 2011, a poverty rate of 15 percent.
NEWS
October 1, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among America's 10 biggest cities, an examination of federal data by The Inquirer shows. The city is already the poorest in that group. Deep poverty is measured as income of 50 percent or less of the poverty rate. A family of four living in deep poverty takes in $12,000 or less annually, half the poverty rate of $24,000 for a family that size. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.3 percent, or around 186,000 people - 60,000 of whom are children, an examination of the newly released U.S. Census 2014 American Community Survey shows.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. poverty rate has decreased for the first time since 2006, according to U.S. Census figures released Tuesday. Children's poverty also declined, while median household income barely changed between 2012 and 2013. The report further shows that 42 million people, 13.4 percent of Americans, were without health-insurance coverage in 2013. The data were compiled in the 2014 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement, which describes conditions in 2013.
NEWS
September 17, 2010 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Driven by the relentless recession, the U.S. poverty rate soared to 14.3 percent in 2009, its highest level in 15 years, new government figures show. The rate was up from 13.2 percent in 2008, according to a report the Census Bureau released Thursday. Locally the picture was less dire, with poverty rising slightly to 11.1 percent in Pennsylvania and to 9.3 percent in New Jersey. The number of people in poverty nationally rose from 39.8 million in 2008 to 43.6 million in 2009 - the most in the 51 years for which poverty figures are available.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The poverty rate in Philadelphia jumped nearly two percentage points from 2009 to 2010, according to a federal report released Thursday, underscoring the growing plight of residents being swamped by unemployment and hard times. "I'm always crying," said Valencia Sydney, a 34-year-old Northeast Philadelphia single mother of one who lost her part-time certified nursing assistant job last year, then plummeted from the working class into poverty. She and her 21/2-year-old daughter face eviction from their $640-a-month apartment, and the two may have to move into a shelter, she said.
NEWS
January 14, 2016
By Claire Grandison and Jamie Gullen While the recent news that our national unemployment rate has fallen to around 5 percent is cause for optimism, a troubling trend should not be overlooked: the persistently high youth unemployment rate. According to the latest release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for youths aged 16 to 19 is 16 percent, more than triple the national average. For African American youths, the number is 24 percent. Although the youth unemployment rate remains consistently high, it is often written off. Some people believe that young people are merely seeking employment to supplement a comfortable family income, occupy time over a languid summer, or gain experience for a college application.
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NEWS
September 16, 2016 | Alfred Lubrano, Jan Hefler, and Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writers
Higher wages for professionals and a jump in the number of low-end jobs combined to give the income of Philadelphians a surprising boost in 2015. The 5.5 percent spike in median household income jibes with a similar rise nationwide. Most of the suburbs also enjoyed satisfying income bumps, with Delaware County leading the way with a robust 7.2 percent increase. Of Philadelphia's surrounding counties, just Burlington and Gloucester registered income shortfalls. The data come from the U.S. Census American Community Survey released Thursday.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
Richard Henry and Robert Jones took a break Tuesday from their maintenance jobs and sat on a ledge outside the Municipal Services Building to watch the protests that had overtaken the plaza. From a stage, a woman crooned for the cheering crowd a shaky soul song - an original, it seemed: "Feeeel the Berrrnn. " There was a Bernie supporter in a Superman costume and another in Bernie jammies. There was guy bearing a large wooden cross on his shoulder with the message, "Vote 4 Jesus.
NEWS
April 21, 2016
By Dan White Pennsylvania, like most of the United States, has a problem. Paychecks have not come back from the Great Recession as strongly as they have following other downturns. American workers' wages and salaries took longer to regain their previous, inflation-adjusted peaks after the Great Recession than after any other recession since World War II. This is especially true in the commonwealth, where wages and salaries grew less than three-quarters of the national rate last year.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
Philadelphia in 2016 is younger, more diverse, and in the midst of a historic, decadelong population upswing - a city undergoing dramatic change after decades of decline. But some of the city's most enduring problems - poverty, low educational attainment, and unemployment - remain frustratingly unsolved, according to the Pew Charitable Trust's State of the City report, released Thursday. The report described Philadelphia as a city transformed - but one that must use its encouraging growth as a stepping-stone.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Pew Charitable Trusts said Tuesday it will give $8.59 million over the next three years to 45 Philadelphia-area groups that help the region's low-income children, youth, and their families. The Center City foundation it expected the grants annually to assist more than 22,000 local young people. The poverty rate for children in the city is 37 percent, Pew said. The grants from the Pew Fund for Health and Human Services is geared to these areas: early education and child care; prevention and early intervention services to reduce behavioral and academic problems; mental health services; quality after-school programs; and helping parents secure and retain public benefits and services to strengthen household stability.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
TODAY IS Super Tuesday, and, by day's end, we could know the respective presidential nominees from each major party. But for Philadelphians, that news pales in comparison with Mayor Kenney's intention to embark on a $600 million plan to remake the city's parks and recreation centers. All politics, after all, are local. And here's our local political reality. The largely white Electrical Workers Union and its equally white counterpart, the Carpenters Union, have dominated taxpayer-funded construction work for years.
NEWS
January 14, 2016
By Claire Grandison and Jamie Gullen While the recent news that our national unemployment rate has fallen to around 5 percent is cause for optimism, a troubling trend should not be overlooked: the persistently high youth unemployment rate. According to the latest release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for youths aged 16 to 19 is 16 percent, more than triple the national average. For African American youths, the number is 24 percent. Although the youth unemployment rate remains consistently high, it is often written off. Some people believe that young people are merely seeking employment to supplement a comfortable family income, occupy time over a languid summer, or gain experience for a college application.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has made some strides in helping its poor over the last two years, but has a long way to go as the most deeply impoverished of the nation's 10 largest cities, according to a City Hall report released Friday. An office established two years ago to reduce poverty in the city reported that in the last year alone, a new network of benefits centers has helped connect several thousand impoverished Philadelphians with about $13 million in local, state, and federal benefits. Other measures also have yielded results since Mayor Nutter created the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity in 2013 and placed Eva Gladstein at the helm as executive director, the group reported.
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Even as poverty leveled off in New Jersey last year, it remained at a 50-year high and showed no signs of abating given persistent structural problems such as income inequality and changing employment trends that are trapping the poor, a new report has found. "New Jersey's current and long-term employment outlooks are ominous and raise the possibility that we are witnessing profound and long-term shifts in employment opportunity, potentially requiring corresponding paradigm shifts in government economic development and antipoverty strategies," reads a 146-page annual report of the Legal Services of New Jersey Poverty Research Institute.
NEWS
November 2, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As it prepares to choose its next mayor, Philadelphia is on a roll. Crime and unemployment are down. Center City is undergoing a revival that is spreading to the neighborhoods. Residents new and old are living in a city that is cleaner, greener, and more enjoyable than it has been in years. But Philadelphia still struggles with the highest poverty rate among the nation's 10 biggest cities, epidemic gun and drug violence, a pension liability threatening to unravel city finances, growth-killing business and wage taxes, and egregiously underfunded, underperforming schools.
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