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Poverty Rate

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NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Latinos have the highest rate of poverty of any racial or ethnic group in Philadelphia. In the city, 44 percent of Latinos live in poverty - twice the national rate of 23.5 percent. The overall Philadelphia poverty rate is 26.3 percent. Latino poverty prevails throughout most of the region as well, both in the Pennsylvania suburbs and in South Jersey. In six of the eight counties in the region - Bucks and Chester Counties being the exceptions - Latinos have the highest poverty rate of all groups.
NEWS
October 7, 1994 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In yet another sign that many Americans remain shut out from a growing economy, the Census Bureau reported yesterday that the poverty rate rose last year to its highest level in 10 years. There were 39.3 million poor Americans in 1993, or 15.1 percent of the population. Although that marked only a slight change from a poverty rate of 14.8 percent in 1992, the increase came at a time of economic expansion. The poverty rate in 1983 was 15.2 percent. The poverty level for a family of four was $14,763 in 1993.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | By Ken Moritsugu, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Demonstrating the power of a strong economy to help the poor, the nation's poverty rate fell in 1999 to its lowest level in two decades, the Census Bureau reported yesterday. Last year 32.3 million people lived in poverty, which the government defines as a maximum annual income of $8,501 for a single person and $17,029 for a family of four. That is 11.8 percent of the nation's 273.5 million people, down from 12.7 percent, or 34.5 million people, in 1998. More than 80 percent of the decline nationwide occurred in "central cities," the urban cores of metropolitan regions.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number of people living in poverty in America last year remained stalled at the same record high level as in 2010, newly released government figures show. In addition, real median household income declined by 1.5 percent between 2010 and 2011 to $50,054. At the same time, the number of people without health-insurance coverage fell from 50 million to 48.6 million during the year. The figures, released Wednesday, come from a U.S. Census Bureau report. According to the report, 46.2 million Americans were living in poverty in 2011, a poverty rate of 15 percent.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. poverty rate has decreased for the first time since 2006, according to U.S. Census figures released Tuesday. Children's poverty also declined, while median household income barely changed between 2012 and 2013. The report further shows that 42 million people, 13.4 percent of Americans, were without health-insurance coverage in 2013. The data were compiled in the 2014 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement, which describes conditions in 2013.
NEWS
September 17, 2010 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Driven by the relentless recession, the U.S. poverty rate soared to 14.3 percent in 2009, its highest level in 15 years, new government figures show. The rate was up from 13.2 percent in 2008, according to a report the Census Bureau released Thursday. Locally the picture was less dire, with poverty rising slightly to 11.1 percent in Pennsylvania and to 9.3 percent in New Jersey. The number of people in poverty nationally rose from 39.8 million in 2008 to 43.6 million in 2009 - the most in the 51 years for which poverty figures are available.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The poverty rate in Philadelphia jumped nearly two percentage points from 2009 to 2010, according to a federal report released Thursday, underscoring the growing plight of residents being swamped by unemployment and hard times. "I'm always crying," said Valencia Sydney, a 34-year-old Northeast Philadelphia single mother of one who lost her part-time certified nursing assistant job last year, then plummeted from the working class into poverty. She and her 21/2-year-old daughter face eviction from their $640-a-month apartment, and the two may have to move into a shelter, she said.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Already the poorest big city in America, Philadelphia also has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.2 percent, or nearly 185,000 people, including about 60,000 children. That's almost twice the U.S. deep-poverty rate of 6.3 percent. Camden's deep-poverty rate of 20 percent is more than three times the national mark, but its population is a fraction of Philadelphia's.
NEWS
November 30, 2000 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an irony of the economic boom, a drop in the poverty rate in Philadelphia's schools and an increased rate in some suburban districts are raising bittersweet concerns about the effect on federal education aid. Fresh estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau being released today show that the percentage of Philadelphia school-age children living in poverty fell by about 19 percent between 1995 and 1997, the last year surveyed. The rate slid from about 36 percent to just under 29 percent.
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NEWS
June 25, 2015
IN A BLACK AND WHITE world, the bad guys are locked up in prison and the good guys are on the outside, living blemish-free lives. But the world has never been black and white, and the issue of who gets locked up in jail has become increasingly gray over the past few decades, even as the prison population has exploded by a factor of four in as many decades. The fact is that who gets locked up is not inscribed in the Constitution. Society and its shifting mores has always determined who gets jailed - including the 17th century when people could be imprisoned for incurring debts.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | John Baer, Daily News Political Columnist
EVERY CANDIDATE in every campaign faces a basic question: Why are you running? Presumably it's a question given much thought before any candidate for any office formally declares and starts a race. To me the answer often offers something fundamental about a candidate's hopes, goals and even character - and I've found one's campaign can be a reflection or extension of a single, usually simple reply. So during a series of sit-downs with top-tier candidates in the May 19 Democratic primary, I posed the question: Why are you running for mayor?
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
Demonstrators in North Philadelphia on Saturday marked the 47th anniversary of the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with demands for a $15 minimum wage. Sharon Sobukwe, a political science professor at Eastern University, told more than 100 people gathered before the march that the poverty rate in the United States has been reduced to 15 percent, but that still means "there are 45 million people living in poverty. " Among African Americans, she said, the poverty rate is 28 percent.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
When Philadelphia's next mayor takes the oath of office inside the glittering Academy of Music, he or she should have a plan to help the city residents who cannot afford to attend a concert, don't have enough food to eat, and do not expect life to get better for them or their children. The next mayor will lead the poorest among the nation's 10 biggest cities. More than a quarter of its 1.5 million residents live in poverty. Thirty-nine percent of its children are poor. There are programs to help, but too many people don't know they qualify.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
"It is a time . . . when want is keenly felt, and abundance rejoices. " - A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens Despite biblical assurances on the awful staying power of poverty, Mayor Nutter deserves credit for launching a high-profile effort to whittle away at the number of poor living in Philadelphia. With poverty clouding the future prospects for one in four Philadelphians - many of them children - parts of the city might offer reminders of Dickensian London, but for the fact of a robust social safety net (not to mention modern sanitation methods)
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
SHARED PROSPERITY Philadelphia - the city's plan to tackle its staggeringly deep poverty rate - has made important strides in its first year of existence, but there's no time for celebration yet. "The challenge is that we're still a desperately poor city," said Eva Gladstein, executive director of the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity, which oversees the program. "Poverty effects 397,000 people - 123,000 of whom are children - in Philadelphia. " In Shared Prosperity's first progress report, released yesterday at the Uniting to Fight Poverty Summit at Community College of Philadelphia, the success of community partnerships, the greater availability of resources for the poor and increased grant funding were heralded as successes.
NEWS
November 19, 2014
IT IS FITTING that yesterday's announcement of Pope Francis' pending visit to Philadelphia fell on the same day as a citywide summit on poverty. The pope has been vocal and consistent in his concern for the world's poor. His focus has come at a very apt time: As the gap between rich and poor grows wider, at the same time compassion for those less fortunate seems to have diminished. Although the occasion of the pope's visit is the World Meeting of Families to be held here, if he wishes the pontiff will have plenty of poor people to visit while he's here.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Latinos have the highest rate of poverty of any racial or ethnic group in Philadelphia. In the city, 44 percent of Latinos live in poverty - twice the national rate of 23.5 percent. The overall Philadelphia poverty rate is 26.3 percent. Latino poverty prevails throughout most of the region as well, both in the Pennsylvania suburbs and in South Jersey. In six of the eight counties in the region - Bucks and Chester Counties being the exceptions - Latinos have the highest poverty rate of all groups.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Already the poorest big city in America, Philadelphia also has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.2 percent, or nearly 185,000 people, including about 60,000 children. That's almost twice the U.S. deep-poverty rate of 6.3 percent. Camden's deep-poverty rate of 20 percent is more than three times the national mark, but its population is a fraction of Philadelphia's.
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