CollectionsPoverty Rate
IN THE NEWS

Poverty Rate

BUSINESS
October 6, 1995 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The poverty rate fell in 1994 for the first time in four years, the Census Bureau reported yesterday, but median income remained stuck - a sign that gains from a surging economy are not getting through to all middle-class households. The Census Bureau also found that nearly one in seven Americans - 39.7 million people - lacked health insurance in 1994, about the same as the previous year. Single mothers and black families gained ground in 1994, but full-time workers and single people living alone fell behind economically.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | By Joseph Gyourko and Anita A. Summers
Block grants to states - a portion of which will wend their way to cities - are an active item in the current policy debate and there are compelling reasons for the nation's political leadership to use these grants to design a new urban strategy. The GOP, in particular, has not been identified as a close friend of urban America. And cities, for their part, have rarely been shining examples of efficiency. But a new strategy is needed to address skewed national responsibilities.
NEWS
September 29, 2000
The poverty level for a family of three is income of $13,290 a year. Does that mean that if you give a dollar to a single mother of two kids, who earns exactly that amount, she won't be poor anymore? Does it mean she'll automatically be able to pay her rent, keep her kids healthy and well fed, with a little left over for the higher heating costs expected this winter? You might think so listening to all the political self-congratulation from the U.S. Census Bureau at the news that the poverty rate is 11.9 percent - the lowest since 1979, with historic lows marked for African-American and Latinos.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Although businesses are hiring and consumers are buying, the benefits of a steadily growing economy have not been reaching America's poor, the Census Bureau reported yesterday. The bureau's annual income, poverty and health-insurance report showed that middle-class incomes had risen modestly in 1996. The median household income stood at $35,492, an increase of $410, or 1.2 percent, from 1995. (Half the households in the country earned more than $35,492; half earned less.) But the poverty rate barely budged, with 13.7 percent of Americans living below the poverty line.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The child-poverty rate declined in Philadelphia during most of the 1990s, but it climbed slightly in some suburban counties amid the economic expansion, according to a U.S. Census Bureau estimate being released today. From 1995 to 1997, the poverty rate rose in Montgomery, Delaware and Bucks Counties, and in New Jersey's Camden, Burlington and Gloucester Counties. During that period, the only suburban county to show improvement was Chester County, in which it fell slightly. The uptick - which took place after a decline in the first half of the decade - comes despite steadily falling poverty rates nationwide and in Pennsylvania, according to previous census reports.
NEWS
August 30, 2006 | By Frank Kummer, Dylan Purcell and Alletta Emeno INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Amid hopes of an economic revival sparked by the surge in condos and waterfront development, Philadelphia and Camden remain dogged by striking poverty levels, new census figures show. Among the nation's 10 largest cities, Philadelphia ranks first in the percentage of people living in poverty: 24.5 percent. Camden also ranks first among cities of its size, with 44 percent in poverty. "I think it's very unfortunate that we are leading the country in this kind of statistic," said Gloria Guard, executive director of the People's Emergency Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 19, 2014
THE U.S. CENSUS released figures this week that show that the national poverty rate has decreased for the first time since 2006. Don't rush to plan a victory parade, though. The percentage of people in poverty has dropped slightly, but the implications are more mathematical than practical: Median household income has remained the same, and the number of those in poverty in 2013 - 45.3 million - is about the same as the year before. And worse news: The percentage of people living below the poverty level in the Philadelphia metro area rose slightly from 2010 to 2013, from 12.7 percent to 13.5 percent; poverty rates in the city fell slightly.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. The annual salary for a single person at half the poverty line is around $5,700; for a family of four, it's around $11,700. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.9 percent, or around 200,000 people. Phoenix, Chicago, and Dallas are the nearest to Philadelphia, with deep-poverty rates of more than 10 percent. The numbers come from an examination of the 2009 through 2011 three-year estimate of the U.S. Census American Community Survey by The Inquirer and Temple University sociologist David Elesh.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
MORE Philadelphians are living in poverty today than a decade ago, and the city's median household income has plummeted, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates being released today. This comes even as there are more city residents who have their high-school diploma or GED, and more who have a bachelor's degree. The rise in poverty and the drop in income are especially stark among the city's African-American residents. The new estimates tell "us that Philadelphia is a pretty harsh place to grow up," said Mariana Chilton, a professor at Drexel University's School of Public Health and a national expert on hunger.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
With the poverty rate in Philadelphia nearing 27 percent, are you concerned for the city's future?
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|