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Poverty Rate

NEWS
September 29, 2000
The poverty level for a family of three is income of $13,290 a year. Does that mean that if you give a dollar to a single mother of two kids, who earns exactly that amount, she won't be poor anymore? Does it mean she'll automatically be able to pay her rent, keep her kids healthy and well fed, with a little left over for the higher heating costs expected this winter? You might think so listening to all the political self-congratulation from the U.S. Census Bureau at the news that the poverty rate is 11.9 percent - the lowest since 1979, with historic lows marked for African-American and Latinos.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Although businesses are hiring and consumers are buying, the benefits of a steadily growing economy have not been reaching America's poor, the Census Bureau reported yesterday. The bureau's annual income, poverty and health-insurance report showed that middle-class incomes had risen modestly in 1996. The median household income stood at $35,492, an increase of $410, or 1.2 percent, from 1995. (Half the households in the country earned more than $35,492; half earned less.) But the poverty rate barely budged, with 13.7 percent of Americans living below the poverty line.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The child-poverty rate declined in Philadelphia during most of the 1990s, but it climbed slightly in some suburban counties amid the economic expansion, according to a U.S. Census Bureau estimate being released today. From 1995 to 1997, the poverty rate rose in Montgomery, Delaware and Bucks Counties, and in New Jersey's Camden, Burlington and Gloucester Counties. During that period, the only suburban county to show improvement was Chester County, in which it fell slightly. The uptick - which took place after a decline in the first half of the decade - comes despite steadily falling poverty rates nationwide and in Pennsylvania, according to previous census reports.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. The annual salary for a single person at half the poverty line is around $5,700; for a family of four, it's around $11,700. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.9 percent, or around 200,000 people. Phoenix, Chicago, and Dallas are the nearest to Philadelphia, with deep-poverty rates of more than 10 percent. The numbers come from an examination of the 2009 through 2011 three-year estimate of the U.S. Census American Community Survey by The Inquirer and Temple University sociologist David Elesh.
NEWS
August 30, 2006 | By Frank Kummer, Dylan Purcell and Alletta Emeno INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Amid hopes of an economic revival sparked by the surge in condos and waterfront development, Philadelphia and Camden remain dogged by striking poverty levels, new census figures show. Among the nation's 10 largest cities, Philadelphia ranks first in the percentage of people living in poverty: 24.5 percent. Camden also ranks first among cities of its size, with 44 percent in poverty. "I think it's very unfortunate that we are leading the country in this kind of statistic," said Gloria Guard, executive director of the People's Emergency Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
With the poverty rate in Philadelphia nearing 27 percent, are you concerned for the city's future?
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Poverty has increased a startling 62 percent in the communities of Lower Northeast Philadelphia since 1999. At the same time, poverty increased 42 percent in Roxborough and Manayunk, while declining 13 percent in South Philadelphia. Those findings come from an Inquirer comparison of 2000 census figures with new data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. The new federal data were contained in the American Community Survey (ACS), a compilation of information collected from 24.5 million people nationwide between 2008 to 2012.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when much of the nation was recovering from recession, many more of Philadelphia's citizens were slipping into poverty. At time when Philadelphia was winning acclaim for getting its fiscal house in order, many more of its children were joining the poor. Even as state and federal lawmakers are considering deep cuts in welfare and other aid crucial to cities, new research at Temple University provides a disturbing picture of Philadelphia in the early 1990s. The Temple analysis shows that the region's "urban poverty rate" went from 18.2 percent in 1989 to 25.6 percent in 1993 as Philadelphia stumbled out of the national recession like a weakened fighter.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
IN A CITY already struggling with a high poverty rate, some Asian ethnic groups are faring worse than the average. About 41 percent of Cambodians in Philadelphia are in poverty, as are about 33 percent of Chinese (not including those from Taiwan), and about 31 percent of Vietnamese. In contrast, the poverty rate for Philadelphia as a whole was 25 percent in the Census Bureau's 2006-10 American Community Survey estimates, used for the poverty figures. The findings were highlighted in a new report, A Community of Contrasts: Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in the Northeast , released yesterday by a consortium of Asian-American organizations.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
  The poverty rate in Philadelphia fell last year while the need for food stamps grew, a seeming paradox teased out by the widely respected American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census. What it means, experts say, is that the economy may be yielding low-wage jobs that lift some people out of poverty, but ultimately the jobs don't pay enough to feed their families. A similar pattern was repeated in Camden, where the poverty rate dipped from a startling 43 percent to 39 percent, while food-stamp need rose 12.6 percentage points between 2011 and 2012.
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