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Poverty Rate

NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poverty rose significantly in Philadelphia and its surrounding counties over the last two years, while the city's median household income in 2011 ranked second-worst among the nation's 25 largest cities. The findings were released Thursday in the American Community Survey One-Year Estimate, an annual sampling of three million people conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The report has a higher margin of error than the census, which is a separate undertaking. "These are very bleak and disconcerting statistics," said Mark Zandi, chief economist with Moody's Analytics, the economic-consulting firm in West Chester.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey registered the highest increase in the number of poor people in America between 2012 and 2013, while poverty dropped slightly in Philadelphia. In South Jersey, which includes Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, an additional 12,145 people became impoverished, a spike of 10 percent that year. In Philadelphia, while 9,000 residents moved out of poverty - a dip from 26.9 percent to 26.3 percent - the city was still the poorest of America's 10 largest cities. The findings were compiled in the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey One-Year Estimates, a huge and diverse set of data based on a survey of people living at 3.5 million addresses throughout the nation.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an unusually frank document, the city has laid out stark statistical descriptions of poverty in Philadelphia, accompanied by a plan to try to deal with the problem. The Shared Prosperity Philadelphia plan, presented Thursday at the Central Library of the Free Library of Philadelphia, states that at a "staggering 28 percent," the poverty rate here is the highest among the nation's 10 largest cities. More than 430,000 of the city's 1,547,600 residents live below the federal poverty line, the report points out. The poverty line ranges from $11,490 for a single person to $23,550 for a family of four.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
IN A CITY already struggling with a high poverty rate, some Asian ethnic groups are faring worse than the average. About 41 percent of Cambodians in Philadelphia are in poverty, as are about 33 percent of Chinese (not including those from Taiwan), and about 31 percent of Vietnamese. In contrast, the poverty rate for Philadelphia as a whole was 25 percent in the Census Bureau's 2006-10 American Community Survey estimates, used for the poverty figures. The findings were highlighted in a new report, A Community of Contrasts: Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in the Northeast , released yesterday by a consortium of Asian-American organizations.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Poverty has increased a startling 62 percent in the communities of Lower Northeast Philadelphia since 1999. At the same time, poverty increased 42 percent in Roxborough and Manayunk, while declining 13 percent in South Philadelphia. Those findings come from an Inquirer comparison of 2000 census figures with new data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. The new federal data were contained in the American Community Survey (ACS), a compilation of information collected from 24.5 million people nationwide between 2008 to 2012.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
MORE Philadelphians are living in poverty today than a decade ago, and the city's median household income has plummeted, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates being released today. This comes even as there are more city residents who have their high-school diploma or GED, and more who have a bachelor's degree. The rise in poverty and the drop in income are especially stark among the city's African-American residents. The new estimates tell "us that Philadelphia is a pretty harsh place to grow up," said Mariana Chilton, a professor at Drexel University's School of Public Health and a national expert on hunger.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when much of the nation was recovering from recession, many more of Philadelphia's citizens were slipping into poverty. At time when Philadelphia was winning acclaim for getting its fiscal house in order, many more of its children were joining the poor. Even as state and federal lawmakers are considering deep cuts in welfare and other aid crucial to cities, new research at Temple University provides a disturbing picture of Philadelphia in the early 1990s. The Temple analysis shows that the region's "urban poverty rate" went from 18.2 percent in 1989 to 25.6 percent in 1993 as Philadelphia stumbled out of the national recession like a weakened fighter.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
Not since 1959 have there been so many poor people in the United States. In 2009, 43.6 million people - 14.3 percent of the population - fell below the poverty line. The previous year, the poverty rate was 13.2 percent. More than one in five American children are living in poverty. In Philadelphia, it's about one in three. The deep recession that began in late 2007 has contributed greatly to the rise in poverty. Economists now say the recession ended in June 2009, making it the longest since World War II. But the economic recovery under President Obama has been weak.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
  The poverty rate in Philadelphia fell last year while the need for food stamps grew, a seeming paradox teased out by the widely respected American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census. What it means, experts say, is that the economy may be yielding low-wage jobs that lift some people out of poverty, but ultimately the jobs don't pay enough to feed their families. A similar pattern was repeated in Camden, where the poverty rate dipped from a startling 43 percent to 39 percent, while food-stamp need rose 12.6 percentage points between 2011 and 2012.
NEWS
September 26, 2002
WAS WELFARE reform really a success? We're about to find out. The 1996 welfare reform law, which is up for re-authorization in Congress (the deadline is Monday), just happened to coincide with the biggest economic boom in the nation's history. Jobs were plentiful, even for unskilled single mothers. Yet a typical entry-level $7-$8 an-hour wage is not exactly livable. Not when it takes an estimated $16.75-an-hour wage to make a two- bedroom apartment in Philadelphia affordable.
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