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Poverty Rate

NEWS
September 22, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
MORE Philadelphians are living in poverty today than a decade ago, and the city's median household income has plummeted, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates being released today. This comes even as there are more city residents who have their high-school diploma or GED, and more who have a bachelor's degree. The rise in poverty and the drop in income are especially stark among the city's African-American residents. The new estimates tell "us that Philadelphia is a pretty harsh place to grow up," said Mariana Chilton, a professor at Drexel University's School of Public Health and a national expert on hunger.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poverty rose significantly in Philadelphia and its surrounding counties over the last two years, while the city's median household income in 2011 ranked second-worst among the nation's 25 largest cities. The findings were released Thursday in the American Community Survey One-Year Estimate, an annual sampling of three million people conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The report has a higher margin of error than the census, which is a separate undertaking. "These are very bleak and disconcerting statistics," said Mark Zandi, chief economist with Moody's Analytics, the economic-consulting firm in West Chester.
NEWS
April 13, 2011
If you can put down all the other loaded questions and look strictly at the numbers, it is pretty safe to say this: If there's any city in America that should be mailing condoms out to 11-year-olds, Philadelphia would be a strong candidate. Statistics about the city and its youth show two things. First, Philadelphia fares poorly when you look at the risk factors for teen sexual activity - especially poverty and single-parent households. Second, perhaps as a result, the city is at or near the top of most measures for sex among teens and adolescents.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
TO PLUG budget deficits, cities raise taxes or cut services, or both. To fix potholes, they send out workers to patch the street. To prevent fires, they distribute smoke detectors and encourage safe building practices. But what can local government do about a problem like poverty? "Poverty is affected by so many international and national factors," said Eva Gladstein, executive director of the city's anti-poverty agency, the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when much of the nation was recovering from recession, many more of Philadelphia's citizens were slipping into poverty. At time when Philadelphia was winning acclaim for getting its fiscal house in order, many more of its children were joining the poor. Even as state and federal lawmakers are considering deep cuts in welfare and other aid crucial to cities, new research at Temple University provides a disturbing picture of Philadelphia in the early 1990s. The Temple analysis shows that the region's "urban poverty rate" went from 18.2 percent in 1989 to 25.6 percent in 1993 as Philadelphia stumbled out of the national recession like a weakened fighter.
NEWS
September 26, 2002
WAS WELFARE reform really a success? We're about to find out. The 1996 welfare reform law, which is up for re-authorization in Congress (the deadline is Monday), just happened to coincide with the biggest economic boom in the nation's history. Jobs were plentiful, even for unskilled single mothers. Yet a typical entry-level $7-$8 an-hour wage is not exactly livable. Not when it takes an estimated $16.75-an-hour wage to make a two- bedroom apartment in Philadelphia affordable.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1996 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Inquirer staff writer Andrew Cassel contributed to this report
Riding a growing economy, household income rose last year for the first time in six years, and poverty in America declined for the second year in a row, the Census Bureau reported yesterday. The median - or midpoint - household income was $34,076 in 1995, a gain of nearly 3 percent from 1994. The poverty rate declined, from 14.5 percent of the population in 1994 to 13.8 percent in 1995. About 36 million Americans lived below the official poverty line - $12,158 for a family of three.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | By Kristin Huckshorn, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The poverty rate among Hispanic children in the United States is soaring because their parents lack the education to hold anything but low-paying jobs, according to a report by the Children's Defense Fund. Hispanic children represent the fastest-growing group of children in the country, census statistics show. They also are falling into poverty more rapidly than white or black children, said Leticia C. Miranda, a policy analyst who wrote the report, which is scheduled for release today.
NEWS
March 9, 1999 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia School District has failed to spend about $30 million in federal funding for remedial programs for needy students over the last three years, and despite plans by the administration to spend some of it now, school board members were asking questions yesterday. "Surely we're not in a position of lack of need," board member Jacques Lurie said last night. "If there is $30 million available, we sure as heck ought to be putting it toward programs we say we need. " In an interview last night, Superintendent David Hornbeck said the $30 million accumulated largely because the district could not find the people to fill budgeted positions.
NEWS
September 3, 1986 | By Paul Magnusson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Hispanics are expected by 1990 to replace blacks as the ethnic group with the highest poverty rate in the nation, according to one analysis of recent Census Bureau data. While income levels among blacks are rising, Hispanics are losing ground and per-capita income among Hispanics is now lower than that for blacks, according to the study. The study noted that the black poverty rate of 31.3 percent last year was about the same as it was in 1979. But the poverty rate for Hispanics increased from 21.8 percent to 29 percent during the same six-year period, said the center, which based its findings on U.S. Census data.
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