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Poverty Rate

NEWS
September 16, 2016 | Alfred Lubrano, Jan Hefler, and Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writers
Higher wages for professionals and a jump in the number of low-end jobs combined to give the income of Philadelphians a surprising boost in 2015. The 5.5 percent spike in median household income jibes with a similar rise nationwide. Most of the suburbs also enjoyed satisfying income bumps, with Delaware County leading the way with a robust 7.2 percent increase. Of Philadelphia's surrounding counties, just Burlington and Gloucester registered income shortfalls. The data come from the U.S. Census American Community Survey released Thursday.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
With the poverty rate in Philadelphia nearing 27 percent, are you concerned for the city's future?
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey registered the highest increase in the number of poor people in America between 2012 and 2013, while poverty dropped slightly in Philadelphia. In South Jersey, which includes Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, an additional 12,145 people became impoverished, a spike of 10 percent that year. In Philadelphia, while 9,000 residents moved out of poverty - a dip from 26.9 percent to 26.3 percent - the city was still the poorest of America's 10 largest cities. The findings were compiled in the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey One-Year Estimates, a huge and diverse set of data based on a survey of people living at 3.5 million addresses throughout the nation.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia remained the poorest of America's 10 largest cities in 2014, with more than one quarter of its residents - 26 percent - living below the poverty line. At the same time, Camden recorded a seemingly significant drop in poverty in 2014 from 42.6 percent to 36.5 percent - a change experts had a hard time explaining. Both findings were mined from the massive data trove known as the American Community Survey 1-Year Estimate, a product of the U.S. Census Bureau, set to officially be released Thursday.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
By Paul R. Levy and Jeremy Nowak We applaud Mayor Nutter for shining a spotlight on Philadelphia's soaring poverty rate with the release of Shared Prosperity. Well in advance of the next mayor's race, he has defined a central challenge: How can Philadelphia, with so many success stories, have an unacceptably high poverty rate of 28 percent, second only to Detroit among major cities? Shared Prosperity links the goal of job growth to the task of supporting residents in gaining the skills and resources to participate in that growth.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Poverty has increased a startling 62 percent in the communities of Lower Northeast Philadelphia since 1999. At the same time, poverty increased 42 percent in Roxborough and Manayunk, while declining 13 percent in South Philadelphia. Those findings come from an Inquirer comparison of 2000 census figures with new data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. The new federal data were contained in the American Community Survey (ACS), a compilation of information collected from 24.5 million people nationwide between 2008 to 2012.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poverty rose significantly in Philadelphia and its surrounding counties over the last two years, while the city's median household income in 2011 ranked second-worst among the nation's 25 largest cities. The findings were released Thursday in the American Community Survey One-Year Estimate, an annual sampling of three million people conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The report has a higher margin of error than the census, which is a separate undertaking. "These are very bleak and disconcerting statistics," said Mark Zandi, chief economist with Moody's Analytics, the economic-consulting firm in West Chester.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when much of the nation was recovering from recession, many more of Philadelphia's citizens were slipping into poverty. At time when Philadelphia was winning acclaim for getting its fiscal house in order, many more of its children were joining the poor. Even as state and federal lawmakers are considering deep cuts in welfare and other aid crucial to cities, new research at Temple University provides a disturbing picture of Philadelphia in the early 1990s. The Temple analysis shows that the region's "urban poverty rate" went from 18.2 percent in 1989 to 25.6 percent in 1993 as Philadelphia stumbled out of the national recession like a weakened fighter.
NEWS
September 18, 2015
A Sunday Business article about demand for office space in Center City misstated the address of the Icon apartment tower. The correct address is 1616 Walnut St. An article Thursday on U.S. Census data incorrectly reported the poverty rates for Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The poverty rate for Pennsylvania went from 13.7 percent in 2013 to 13.6 percent in 2014. The New Jersey rate changed from 11.4 percent to 11.1 percent during the same period. An article Thursday on the arrest in the Agatha Hall homicide gave incorrect funeral information.
NEWS
September 26, 2002
WAS WELFARE reform really a success? We're about to find out. The 1996 welfare reform law, which is up for re-authorization in Congress (the deadline is Monday), just happened to coincide with the biggest economic boom in the nation's history. Jobs were plentiful, even for unskilled single mothers. Yet a typical entry-level $7-$8 an-hour wage is not exactly livable. Not when it takes an estimated $16.75-an-hour wage to make a two- bedroom apartment in Philadelphia affordable.
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