CollectionsPoverty Rate
IN THE NEWS

Poverty Rate

NEWS
September 23, 2011
With the poverty rate in Philadelphia nearing 27 percent, are you concerned for the city's future?
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Poverty has increased a startling 62 percent in the communities of Lower Northeast Philadelphia since 1999. At the same time, poverty increased 42 percent in Roxborough and Manayunk, while declining 13 percent in South Philadelphia. Those findings come from an Inquirer comparison of 2000 census figures with new data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. The new federal data were contained in the American Community Survey (ACS), a compilation of information collected from 24.5 million people nationwide between 2008 to 2012.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an unusually frank document, the city has laid out stark statistical descriptions of poverty in Philadelphia, accompanied by a plan to try to deal with the problem. The Shared Prosperity Philadelphia plan, presented Thursday at the Central Library of the Free Library of Philadelphia, states that at a "staggering 28 percent," the poverty rate here is the highest among the nation's 10 largest cities. More than 430,000 of the city's 1,547,600 residents live below the federal poverty line, the report points out. The poverty line ranges from $11,490 for a single person to $23,550 for a family of four.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
Philadelphia in 2016 is younger, more diverse, and in the midst of a historic, decadelong population upswing - a city undergoing dramatic change after decades of decline. But some of the city's most enduring problems - poverty, low educational attainment, and unemployment - remain frustratingly unsolved, according to the Pew Charitable Trust's State of the City report, released Thursday. The report described Philadelphia as a city transformed - but one that must use its encouraging growth as a stepping-stone.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
MORE Philadelphians are living in poverty today than a decade ago, and the city's median household income has plummeted, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates being released today. This comes even as there are more city residents who have their high-school diploma or GED, and more who have a bachelor's degree. The rise in poverty and the drop in income are especially stark among the city's African-American residents. The new estimates tell "us that Philadelphia is a pretty harsh place to grow up," said Mariana Chilton, a professor at Drexel University's School of Public Health and a national expert on hunger.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey registered the highest increase in the number of poor people in America between 2012 and 2013, while poverty dropped slightly in Philadelphia. In South Jersey, which includes Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, an additional 12,145 people became impoverished, a spike of 10 percent that year. In Philadelphia, while 9,000 residents moved out of poverty - a dip from 26.9 percent to 26.3 percent - the city was still the poorest of America's 10 largest cities. The findings were compiled in the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey One-Year Estimates, a huge and diverse set of data based on a survey of people living at 3.5 million addresses throughout the nation.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia remained the poorest of America's 10 largest cities in 2014, with more than one quarter of its residents - 26 percent - living below the poverty line. At the same time, Camden recorded a seemingly significant drop in poverty in 2014 from 42.6 percent to 36.5 percent - a change experts had a hard time explaining. Both findings were mined from the massive data trove known as the American Community Survey 1-Year Estimate, a product of the U.S. Census Bureau, set to officially be released Thursday.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when much of the nation was recovering from recession, many more of Philadelphia's citizens were slipping into poverty. At time when Philadelphia was winning acclaim for getting its fiscal house in order, many more of its children were joining the poor. Even as state and federal lawmakers are considering deep cuts in welfare and other aid crucial to cities, new research at Temple University provides a disturbing picture of Philadelphia in the early 1990s. The Temple analysis shows that the region's "urban poverty rate" went from 18.2 percent in 1989 to 25.6 percent in 1993 as Philadelphia stumbled out of the national recession like a weakened fighter.
NEWS
September 18, 2015
A Sunday Business article about demand for office space in Center City misstated the address of the Icon apartment tower. The correct address is 1616 Walnut St. An article Thursday on U.S. Census data incorrectly reported the poverty rates for Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The poverty rate for Pennsylvania went from 13.7 percent in 2013 to 13.6 percent in 2014. The New Jersey rate changed from 11.4 percent to 11.1 percent during the same period. An article Thursday on the arrest in the Agatha Hall homicide gave incorrect funeral information.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Pew Charitable Trusts said Tuesday it will give $8.59 million over the next three years to 45 Philadelphia-area groups that help the region's low-income children, youth, and their families. The Center City foundation it expected the grants annually to assist more than 22,000 local young people. The poverty rate for children in the city is 37 percent, Pew said. The grants from the Pew Fund for Health and Human Services is geared to these areas: early education and child care; prevention and early intervention services to reduce behavioral and academic problems; mental health services; quality after-school programs; and helping parents secure and retain public benefits and services to strengthen household stability.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|