CollectionsPoverty Rate
IN THE NEWS

Poverty Rate

NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. The annual salary for a single person at half the poverty line is around $5,700; for a family of four, it's around $11,700. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.9 percent, or around 200,000 people. Phoenix, Chicago, and Dallas are the nearest to Philadelphia, with deep-poverty rates of more than 10 percent. The numbers come from an examination of the 2009 through 2011 three-year estimate of the U.S. Census American Community Survey by The Inquirer and Temple University sociologist David Elesh.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
With the poverty rate in Philadelphia nearing 27 percent, are you concerned for the city's future?
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has made some strides in helping its poor over the last two years, but has a long way to go as the most deeply impoverished of the nation's 10 largest cities, according to a City Hall report released Friday. An office established two years ago to reduce poverty in the city reported that in the last year alone, a new network of benefits centers has helped connect several thousand impoverished Philadelphians with about $13 million in local, state, and federal benefits. Other measures also have yielded results since Mayor Nutter created the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity in 2013 and placed Eva Gladstein at the helm as executive director, the group reported.
NEWS
November 2, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As it prepares to choose its next mayor, Philadelphia is on a roll. Crime and unemployment are down. Center City is undergoing a revival that is spreading to the neighborhoods. Residents new and old are living in a city that is cleaner, greener, and more enjoyable than it has been in years. But Philadelphia still struggles with the highest poverty rate among the nation's 10 biggest cities, epidemic gun and drug violence, a pension liability threatening to unravel city finances, growth-killing business and wage taxes, and egregiously underfunded, underperforming schools.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Poverty has increased a startling 62 percent in the communities of Lower Northeast Philadelphia since 1999. At the same time, poverty increased 42 percent in Roxborough and Manayunk, while declining 13 percent in South Philadelphia. Those findings come from an Inquirer comparison of 2000 census figures with new data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. The new federal data were contained in the American Community Survey (ACS), a compilation of information collected from 24.5 million people nationwide between 2008 to 2012.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when much of the nation was recovering from recession, many more of Philadelphia's citizens were slipping into poverty. At time when Philadelphia was winning acclaim for getting its fiscal house in order, many more of its children were joining the poor. Even as state and federal lawmakers are considering deep cuts in welfare and other aid crucial to cities, new research at Temple University provides a disturbing picture of Philadelphia in the early 1990s. The Temple analysis shows that the region's "urban poverty rate" went from 18.2 percent in 1989 to 25.6 percent in 1993 as Philadelphia stumbled out of the national recession like a weakened fighter.
NEWS
October 1, 2015
ONE OF THE MANY bright spots of the pope's visit to America - as well as his presence in the Vatican - is his insistence on talking about poverty. Last week, he reminded Congress that capitalism is a worthy system, as long as it helps benefit all. Francis is certainly not the first voice on the subject, but his actions and humility backing his sentiments has brought a new dimension to the subject; the pope has infused poverty and those who experience it with dignity that has long been lost in the divisive and bitter political dialogues that has emerged in the last decade - one that blames the victim while ignoring the underpinnings of an economy that bolsters only a select few. Despite Francis' words, real change is going to require something closer to a miracle.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
MORE Philadelphians are living in poverty today than a decade ago, and the city's median household income has plummeted, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates being released today. This comes even as there are more city residents who have their high-school diploma or GED, and more who have a bachelor's degree. The rise in poverty and the drop in income are especially stark among the city's African-American residents. The new estimates tell "us that Philadelphia is a pretty harsh place to grow up," said Mariana Chilton, a professor at Drexel University's School of Public Health and a national expert on hunger.
NEWS
September 18, 2015
A Sunday Business article about demand for office space in Center City misstated the address of the Icon apartment tower. The correct address is 1616 Walnut St. An article Thursday on U.S. Census data incorrectly reported the poverty rates for Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The poverty rate for Pennsylvania went from 13.7 percent in 2013 to 13.6 percent in 2014. The New Jersey rate changed from 11.4 percent to 11.1 percent during the same period. An article Thursday on the arrest in the Agatha Hall homicide gave incorrect funeral information.
NEWS
September 26, 2002
WAS WELFARE reform really a success? We're about to find out. The 1996 welfare reform law, which is up for re-authorization in Congress (the deadline is Monday), just happened to coincide with the biggest economic boom in the nation's history. Jobs were plentiful, even for unskilled single mothers. Yet a typical entry-level $7-$8 an-hour wage is not exactly livable. Not when it takes an estimated $16.75-an-hour wage to make a two- bedroom apartment in Philadelphia affordable.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|