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Poverty Rate

NEWS
September 23, 2011
With the poverty rate in Philadelphia nearing 27 percent, are you concerned for the city's future?
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey registered the highest increase in the number of poor people in America between 2012 and 2013, while poverty dropped slightly in Philadelphia. In South Jersey, which includes Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, an additional 12,145 people became impoverished, a spike of 10 percent that year. In Philadelphia, while 9,000 residents moved out of poverty - a dip from 26.9 percent to 26.3 percent - the city was still the poorest of America's 10 largest cities. The findings were compiled in the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey One-Year Estimates, a huge and diverse set of data based on a survey of people living at 3.5 million addresses throughout the nation.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poverty rose significantly in Philadelphia and its surrounding counties over the last two years, while the city's median household income in 2011 ranked second-worst among the nation's 25 largest cities. The findings were released Thursday in the American Community Survey One-Year Estimate, an annual sampling of three million people conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The report has a higher margin of error than the census, which is a separate undertaking. "These are very bleak and disconcerting statistics," said Mark Zandi, chief economist with Moody's Analytics, the economic-consulting firm in West Chester.
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hoping to stabilize the dilapidated West Philadelphia neighborhood of Mantua, the city wants to entice police officers and firefighters to move into the struggling area - with cash to help buy homes and pay taxes on them. Officials think having police and firefighters living in Mantua and interacting as neighbors with residents would improve the quality of life in the area. But even with the cash incentives, the initial $200,000 program could be a hard sell. "It's a good idea," said Joe Schulle, president of the International Association of Fire Fighters Local 22. "However, our guys are still going to be reluctant to move into transient neighborhoods if they have kids and families.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
"It is a time . . . when want is keenly felt, and abundance rejoices. " - A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens Despite biblical assurances on the awful staying power of poverty, Mayor Nutter deserves credit for launching a high-profile effort to whittle away at the number of poor living in Philadelphia. With poverty clouding the future prospects for one in four Philadelphians - many of them children - parts of the city might offer reminders of Dickensian London, but for the fact of a robust social safety net (not to mention modern sanitation methods)
NEWS
July 20, 2013
By Paul R. Levy and Jeremy Nowak We applaud Mayor Nutter for shining a spotlight on Philadelphia's soaring poverty rate with the release of Shared Prosperity. Well in advance of the next mayor's race, he has defined a central challenge: How can Philadelphia, with so many success stories, have an unacceptably high poverty rate of 28 percent, second only to Detroit among major cities? Shared Prosperity links the goal of job growth to the task of supporting residents in gaining the skills and resources to participate in that growth.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Harold Jackson, Editor of the Editorial Page
Growing up poor isn't so bad. Most poor kids don't even notice it, since it's unlikely that their friends and neighbors are doing any better. But being accustomed to poverty doesn't excuse its existence. As a child, it never struck me as anything other than normal that my brothers and I wore patched jeans. I didn't care, but in retrospect I know my mother did. She took the time to sew the patches on the inside of our pants and used a darning technique to make the patchwork less visible.
NEWS
April 13, 2011
If you can put down all the other loaded questions and look strictly at the numbers, it is pretty safe to say this: If there's any city in America that should be mailing condoms out to 11-year-olds, Philadelphia would be a strong candidate. Statistics about the city and its youth show two things. First, Philadelphia fares poorly when you look at the risk factors for teen sexual activity - especially poverty and single-parent households. Second, perhaps as a result, the city is at or near the top of most measures for sex among teens and adolescents.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when much of the nation was recovering from recession, many more of Philadelphia's citizens were slipping into poverty. At time when Philadelphia was winning acclaim for getting its fiscal house in order, many more of its children were joining the poor. Even as state and federal lawmakers are considering deep cuts in welfare and other aid crucial to cities, new research at Temple University provides a disturbing picture of Philadelphia in the early 1990s. The Temple analysis shows that the region's "urban poverty rate" went from 18.2 percent in 1989 to 25.6 percent in 1993 as Philadelphia stumbled out of the national recession like a weakened fighter.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
  The poverty rate in Philadelphia fell last year while the need for food stamps grew, a seeming paradox teased out by the widely respected American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census. What it means, experts say, is that the economy may be yielding low-wage jobs that lift some people out of poverty, but ultimately the jobs don't pay enough to feed their families. A similar pattern was repeated in Camden, where the poverty rate dipped from a startling 43 percent to 39 percent, while food-stamp need rose 12.6 percentage points between 2011 and 2012.
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