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Poverty Rate

NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Poverty has increased a startling 62 percent in the communities of Lower Northeast Philadelphia since 1999. At the same time, poverty increased 42 percent in Roxborough and Manayunk, while declining 13 percent in South Philadelphia. Those findings come from an Inquirer comparison of 2000 census figures with new data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. The new federal data were contained in the American Community Survey (ACS), a compilation of information collected from 24.5 million people nationwide between 2008 to 2012.
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hoping to stabilize the dilapidated West Philadelphia neighborhood of Mantua, the city wants to entice police officers and firefighters to move into the struggling area - with cash to help buy homes and pay taxes on them. Officials think having police and firefighters living in Mantua and interacting as neighbors with residents would improve the quality of life in the area. But even with the cash incentives, the initial $200,000 program could be a hard sell. "It's a good idea," said Joe Schulle, president of the International Association of Fire Fighters Local 22. "However, our guys are still going to be reluctant to move into transient neighborhoods if they have kids and families.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poverty rose significantly in Philadelphia and its surrounding counties over the last two years, while the city's median household income in 2011 ranked second-worst among the nation's 25 largest cities. The findings were released Thursday in the American Community Survey One-Year Estimate, an annual sampling of three million people conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The report has a higher margin of error than the census, which is a separate undertaking. "These are very bleak and disconcerting statistics," said Mark Zandi, chief economist with Moody's Analytics, the economic-consulting firm in West Chester.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when much of the nation was recovering from recession, many more of Philadelphia's citizens were slipping into poverty. At time when Philadelphia was winning acclaim for getting its fiscal house in order, many more of its children were joining the poor. Even as state and federal lawmakers are considering deep cuts in welfare and other aid crucial to cities, new research at Temple University provides a disturbing picture of Philadelphia in the early 1990s. The Temple analysis shows that the region's "urban poverty rate" went from 18.2 percent in 1989 to 25.6 percent in 1993 as Philadelphia stumbled out of the national recession like a weakened fighter.
NEWS
September 14, 2011 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stymied by a relentlessly dismal economy, more Americans were in poverty in 2010 than at any other time since poverty levels were first published 52 years ago, new government figures show. Overall, 46.2 million Americans lived in poverty in 2010, up from 43.6 million in 2009. The poverty standard for a family of four is an annual income of $22,113. The poverty rate last year was 15.1 percent, compared with 14.3 percent in 2009. It was the highest rate in 17 years, according to U.S. Census figures released Tuesday.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
IN A CITY already struggling with a high poverty rate, some Asian ethnic groups are faring worse than the average. About 41 percent of Cambodians in Philadelphia are in poverty, as are about 33 percent of Chinese (not including those from Taiwan), and about 31 percent of Vietnamese. In contrast, the poverty rate for Philadelphia as a whole was 25 percent in the Census Bureau's 2006-10 American Community Survey estimates, used for the poverty figures. The findings were highlighted in a new report, A Community of Contrasts: Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in the Northeast , released yesterday by a consortium of Asian-American organizations.
NEWS
September 26, 2002
WAS WELFARE reform really a success? We're about to find out. The 1996 welfare reform law, which is up for re-authorization in Congress (the deadline is Monday), just happened to coincide with the biggest economic boom in the nation's history. Jobs were plentiful, even for unskilled single mothers. Yet a typical entry-level $7-$8 an-hour wage is not exactly livable. Not when it takes an estimated $16.75-an-hour wage to make a two- bedroom apartment in Philadelphia affordable.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1996 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Inquirer staff writer Andrew Cassel contributed to this report
Riding a growing economy, household income rose last year for the first time in six years, and poverty in America declined for the second year in a row, the Census Bureau reported yesterday. The median - or midpoint - household income was $34,076 in 1995, a gain of nearly 3 percent from 1994. The poverty rate declined, from 14.5 percent of the population in 1994 to 13.8 percent in 1995. About 36 million Americans lived below the official poverty line - $12,158 for a family of three.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | By Kristin Huckshorn, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The poverty rate among Hispanic children in the United States is soaring because their parents lack the education to hold anything but low-paying jobs, according to a report by the Children's Defense Fund. Hispanic children represent the fastest-growing group of children in the country, census statistics show. They also are falling into poverty more rapidly than white or black children, said Leticia C. Miranda, a policy analyst who wrote the report, which is scheduled for release today.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an unusually frank document, the city has laid out stark statistical descriptions of poverty in Philadelphia, accompanied by a plan to try to deal with the problem. The Shared Prosperity Philadelphia plan, presented Thursday at the Central Library of the Free Library of Philadelphia, states that at a "staggering 28 percent," the poverty rate here is the highest among the nation's 10 largest cities. More than 430,000 of the city's 1,547,600 residents live below the federal poverty line, the report points out. The poverty line ranges from $11,490 for a single person to $23,550 for a family of four.
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