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Poverty Rate

NEWS
October 2, 2010
It's no surprise to see Philadelphia listed as the poorest among America's 10 largest cities. It's held that distinction before. But placing last again is disappointing, and points out the need for public officials to work even harder to create jobs. U.S. census figures released Tuesday put the city's poverty rate at 25 percent, compared with about 14 percent nationally. The recession exacerbated the problem, with record numbers applying for food aid. One out of three children in Philadelphia is poor.
NEWS
August 29, 2007 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Senior Writer
The national poverty rate fell slightly last year, its first decline in a decade, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures released yesterday. Yet while the median household income rose, it remained below 1999 levels in terms of buying power, and real wages fell for a third straight year. "I'm putting in longer and longer hours, and I'm looking for a second part-time job," said Donna Waldemarra, 44, of Newtonville, N.J., who works as a receptionist at a car dealership. "It's very tight.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poverty rose significantly in Philadelphia and its surrounding counties over the last two years, while the city's median household income in 2011 ranked second-worst among the nation's 25 largest cities. The findings were released Thursday in the American Community Survey One-Year Estimate, an annual sampling of three million people conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The report has a higher margin of error than the census, which is a separate undertaking. "These are very bleak and disconcerting statistics," said Mark Zandi, chief economist with Moody's Analytics, the economic-consulting firm in West Chester.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
More New Jersey residents lived in poverty in 2010 than ever before, according to a report released Sunday. A record 885,0000 people in the state, nearly 300,000 of them children, lived below the poverty line, say authors of an analysis by the Legal Services of New Jersey Poverty Research Institute in Edison, which is based on the most recent numbers available. Overall, the poverty rate increased from 8.7 percent in 2008 to 9.4 percent in 2009, and finally to 10.3 percent in 2010.
NEWS
September 29, 2009 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The percentage of households receiving food stamps in Philadelphia increased by nearly 3 percentage points between 2007 and 2008 - the period of time marking the start of the recession - according to figures released yesterday by the U.S. Census Bureau. And that number is only expected to rise, according to Rachel Meeks, food-stamp campaign manager for the Greater Philadelphia Coalition Against Hunger. "Numbers are going up pretty dramatically because of the economy," Meeks said yesterday.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
Gov. Ridge has issued promising guidelines for next year's state budget that suggest new initiatives to improve preschool readiness, health insurance "outreach" to children and child-care options for low-income parents. Under this governor, Pennsylvania has mostly struggled to stitch together such threads of a safety net for the children of the working poor and those leaving welfare for work. The failure to make more progress has been hard to defend - especially given Pennsylvania's spotty use of the federal funds available for states to help former welfare recipients being moved into the low-wage workforce by tough-minded reforms.
NEWS
September 24, 1996 | By Thomas Farragher, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Hoping to remove the chief obstacle to a far-reaching bill to combat illegal immigration, Republicans are dropping language that would have let states deny free public education to illegal immigrant children, congressional sources said yesterday. Under terms of a face-saving compromise, the education component would be stripped from the legislation as early as today, when a House-Senate conference committee meets. The provision then would be resurrected as a stand-alone bill, which would face almost certain defeat in the Senate.
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | By OSHA GRAY DAVIDSON
Speaking to the choir of big-city mayors gathered recently for the Urban Summit in New York City, Mayor Tom Bradley of Los Angeles said: "If we do not save our cities, we shall not save this nation. " But it is a less-frequently heard fact that the country's rural areas are also vital to the nation's health. After all, fully one-quarter of Americans live in rural areas, and virtually all our food, fiber and timber is grown there. But despite the widespread notion of rural prosperity, health, and happiness, the inhabitants of our small towns and countryside are suffering as much as those who live in America's major cities.
NEWS
September 26, 2011
Obama prepares to shift blame I am sick of hearing President Obama castigating Republicans for not supporting his tax proposals. What Obama has done is perfectly position himself to shift blame for next year's even-worse economy. He can argue then that the failed economy is the fault of mean, insensitive, and uncaring Republicans for obstructing his wise and caring policies. I urge the Republican Party to call his bluff. Give him everything he wants, from soak-the-rich taxes to boondoggle stimulus to new environmental regulations.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
Not since 1959 have there been so many poor people in the United States. In 2009, 43.6 million people - 14.3 percent of the population - fell below the poverty line. The previous year, the poverty rate was 13.2 percent. More than one in five American children are living in poverty. In Philadelphia, it's about one in three. The deep recession that began in late 2007 has contributed greatly to the rise in poverty. Economists now say the recession ended in June 2009, making it the longest since World War II. But the economic recovery under President Obama has been weak.
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