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Poverty Rate

NEWS
October 27, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Many of America's poor children have no future and no hope of improving their lot, and their bleak prospects threaten to overwhelm even the most booming cities, the nation's mayors said yesterday. From substance abuse to deteriorating public schools to teen-age pregnancy and a lack of adequate child care, the U.S. Conference of Mayors ticked off problems they said threaten to overwhelm even the most booming metropolises. Officials said low-income children are confronted with the additional problems of homelessness and the lack of access to medical and mental health care.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
An alarming new study shows more New Jersey residents than ever are struggling to provide for their families. A record 885,000 people in the state lived below the poverty line in 2010, according to the study released Sunday by the Legal Services of New Jersey Poverty Research Institute. The poverty rate increased from 9.4 percent in 2009 to 10.3 percent in 2010, based on the latest census figures available. Among the poor were 300,000 children, the state's most vulnerable and neediest residents.
NEWS
October 2, 2010
It's no surprise to see Philadelphia listed as the poorest among America's 10 largest cities. It's held that distinction before. But placing last again is disappointing, and points out the need for public officials to work even harder to create jobs. U.S. census figures released Tuesday put the city's poverty rate at 25 percent, compared with about 14 percent nationally. The recession exacerbated the problem, with record numbers applying for food aid. One out of three children in Philadelphia is poor.
NEWS
August 29, 2007 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Senior Writer
The national poverty rate fell slightly last year, its first decline in a decade, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures released yesterday. Yet while the median household income rose, it remained below 1999 levels in terms of buying power, and real wages fell for a third straight year. "I'm putting in longer and longer hours, and I'm looking for a second part-time job," said Donna Waldemarra, 44, of Newtonville, N.J., who works as a receptionist at a car dealership. "It's very tight.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Patrick Kerkstra
In too many Philadelphia circles, there's a view that the answer to the city's poverty pandemic is to just open more coffee shops, more restaurants, more yoga studios. More Center City, in other words. In this view, virtuous "urban pioneers" - as they sometimes call themselves, seemingly unaware of what that phrase implies about the neighborhoods they are settling in - are eradicating poverty block by block, renovating row homes and old warehouses, or building townhomes on formerly vacant lots.
NEWS
September 29, 2009 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The percentage of households receiving food stamps in Philadelphia increased by nearly 3 percentage points between 2007 and 2008 - the period of time marking the start of the recession - according to figures released yesterday by the U.S. Census Bureau. And that number is only expected to rise, according to Rachel Meeks, food-stamp campaign manager for the Greater Philadelphia Coalition Against Hunger. "Numbers are going up pretty dramatically because of the economy," Meeks said yesterday.
NEWS
September 22, 2012 | By Patrick Kerkstra, For the Inquirer
What to make of this week's dueling economic headlines? Somehow, Philadelphia is growing both more impoverished and more competitive. The Pew Philadelphia Research Initiative is out with a new study revealing that the suburbs, not the city, have raised residential taxes most rapidly over the last decade. Philadelphia hasn't achieved tax parity - not by a long shot - but the Pew report suggests strongly the city is moving in the right direction. Encouraging. And yet The Inquirer's Alfred Lubrano reports that Philadelphia's poverty rate jumped 6.4 percent in a year, solidifying Philadelphia's status as one of the nation's poorest big cities.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
Gov. Ridge has issued promising guidelines for next year's state budget that suggest new initiatives to improve preschool readiness, health insurance "outreach" to children and child-care options for low-income parents. Under this governor, Pennsylvania has mostly struggled to stitch together such threads of a safety net for the children of the working poor and those leaving welfare for work. The failure to make more progress has been hard to defend - especially given Pennsylvania's spotty use of the federal funds available for states to help former welfare recipients being moved into the low-wage workforce by tough-minded reforms.
NEWS
September 24, 1996 | By Thomas Farragher, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Hoping to remove the chief obstacle to a far-reaching bill to combat illegal immigration, Republicans are dropping language that would have let states deny free public education to illegal immigrant children, congressional sources said yesterday. Under terms of a face-saving compromise, the education component would be stripped from the legislation as early as today, when a House-Senate conference committee meets. The provision then would be resurrected as a stand-alone bill, which would face almost certain defeat in the Senate.
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | By OSHA GRAY DAVIDSON
Speaking to the choir of big-city mayors gathered recently for the Urban Summit in New York City, Mayor Tom Bradley of Los Angeles said: "If we do not save our cities, we shall not save this nation. " But it is a less-frequently heard fact that the country's rural areas are also vital to the nation's health. After all, fully one-quarter of Americans live in rural areas, and virtually all our food, fiber and timber is grown there. But despite the widespread notion of rural prosperity, health, and happiness, the inhabitants of our small towns and countryside are suffering as much as those who live in America's major cities.
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