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Power Outages

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NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every day since superstorm Sandy buzzsawed through the Philadelphia region the number of power outages has declined. Tomorrow could show an increase, especially in New Jersey, because of a new storm, a nor'easter expected to bring high winds and, along the I-95 corridor, up to 5 inches of snow. Pennsylvania's in pretty good shape. Fewer than 100 Peco customers are still without electricity - out of a record-busting 850,000 homes and businesses knocked off-line. "We feel like we'll be in good shape to handle this storm," said spokeswoman Karen Muldoon Geus.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Cain Burdeau and Kevin McGill, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - Tens of thousands of customers remained in the dark Monday in Louisiana and Mississippi, nearly a week after Isaac inundated the Gulf Coast with a deluge that still has some low-lying areas under water. Most of those were in Louisiana, where utilities reported more than 100,000 people without power. Thousands also were without power in Mississippi and Arkansas. In Louisiana, many evacuees remained at shelters or bunked with friends or relatives. "My family is split up," said Angela Serpas, from severely flooded Braithwaite in Plaquemines Parish.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Andrew Seidman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peco Energy Co. is reporting an "issue with underground cables" near Lancaster Avenue and Rittenhouse Place in Lower Merion. Peco workers are on site, and the utility company is assembling more specialized crews to assess the damage. Peco will have to cut off electricity before workers can go underground safely, company spokesman Ben Armstrong said. "The insulation around the cables could be heating up and causing the manhole to smoke," Armstrong said. "You could be seeing smoke coming from the manhole.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | By Michael B. Coakley, Robert W. Fowler and Peter Landry, Inquirer Staff Writers Contributing to this article were Inquirer staff writers Lini S. Kadaba, Julia Cass and Frank Lawlor and correspondents Mike Franolich, Stephen Keating, Wendy Greenberg, Christine Hausman, Lynda Macellaro, Jamie Catrambone and Sari Harrar
A storm packing 75 m.p.h. winds tore into the Philadelphia area last night, uprooting trees, damaging buildings and taking down power lines, interrupting service to thousands. The National Weather Service, which began issuing warnings in the area shortly after 5 p.m., referred to the violent weather as a line of severe thunderstorms. The rapidly moving storm front proceeded at speeds as high as 50 m.p.h. from the Ohio Valley to Connecticut. Little thunder and lightning were experienced in the Philadelphia area, and rainfall was scattered and minimal, according to a weather service spokesman.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may not be until Sunday or Monday that everyone in the region finally sees the light. The numbers keep dwindling, down to about 15,000 homes and business without power early this morning in eastern Pennsylvania. Saturday's freakishly heavy snowstorm kicked nearly a million Peco, PPL Electric and Met Ed customers off the grid. So some 985,000 have been restored. But you can bet griping was still going on this morning in Bucks County's Nockamixon Township, and Reading, Birdsboro, Fleetwood and Mohnton in Berks - all served by Met Ed - as well as in Lehigh County's Lower Macungie Township, served by PPL Electric.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
After an afternoon high of 68 - just two degrees shy of the record for the date set in 1947 - the Philadelphia area faces heavy rain and high winds tonight, raising the possibility of some power outages, flash flooding and flight delays. Temperatures should then drop drastically, with overnight lows in the 20s Thursday night, when a chance of light snow continues into Friday morning. Some morning commutes might be messy the next two days for very different reasons. Today's rain could start in the city by early evening, becoming likely by 8 p.m. "A substantial squall line will probably cross the area between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m. and thunderstorms may be embedded in this line," according to a National Weather Service flood watch issued for Eastern Pennsylvania and Delaware.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission on Wednesday said it wants to hear from electricity customers whose service was knocked out during last month's ice storm. The PUC will hold hearings on March 24 at Montgomery County Community College Advanced Technology Center, 340 DeKalb Pike, Blue Bell, and on March 26 at the Tredyffrin Township Building, 1100 DuPortail Road, Berwyn. The hearings start at 6:30 p.m. The storm knocked out 968,000 Pennsylvania electric customers, some for as long as nine days, and the PUC is particularly interested in hearing testimony about utility communications during the storm.
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
Yesterday, the trees were not your friend. Ice-crusted limbs were the culprits that took out power lines throughout the Philadelphia region, causing about 100,000 homes in the Pennsylvania suburbs to lose power at the peak of yet another major wintry blast. By the time the assault of freezing rain let up amid rising temperatures by the middle of the day, Amtrak's busy Northeast Corridor service between Philadelphia and New York had been knocked out for a time, and more than 100 suburban districts canceled yet another school day. But the biggest lasting local impact from the outer edge of the same 2,000-mile monster storm that caused a blizzard in Chicago and ripped apart the roof of fabled Wrigley Field were the widespread power outages - some of which lasted into today.
NEWS
July 10, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Power outages are rites of spring around here, but this time, even Peco was in the dark. There was no thunder, no high winds, no lightning, no car smashing into a utility pole. Yet somehow, six Delaware County homes had lost power. Peco was mystified, until an investigation revealed a surprising, and creepy, answer: Call it vege-terrorism. A renegade vine had crept up a utility pole - a good 35 feet straight up - worked its way onto a power line, and tripped the wire.
NEWS
November 3, 2012 | By Bill Reedand James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Steve Ward of North Jersey paid $167 at a Morrisville gas station Friday to fill up the tank of his minivan and a half-dozen containers. Dennis Kagen couldn't care less about the price as he waited to gas up his truck at the crowded Turkey Hill station in Ottsville, Upper Bucks County. "It doesn't even matter at this point. If you can get it, you get it," said Kagen, who lives about 15 miles east, across the Delaware River in Stockton, N.J. Both men considered themselves lucky to be working in Pennsylvania, where they avoided the hours-long lines and heated confrontations over gas that Sandy has produced in their home state since Monday.
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BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission on Wednesday said it wants to hear from electricity customers whose service was knocked out during last month's ice storm. The PUC will hold hearings on March 24 at Montgomery County Community College Advanced Technology Center, 340 DeKalb Pike, Blue Bell, and on March 26 at the Tredyffrin Township Building, 1100 DuPortail Road, Berwyn. The hearings start at 6:30 p.m. The storm knocked out 968,000 Pennsylvania electric customers, some for as long as nine days, and the PUC is particularly interested in hearing testimony about utility communications during the storm.
NEWS
February 11, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
TREDYFFRIN While most of their neighbors sought shelter at area hotels in the aftermath of last week's winter storm, the Parker family hunkered down here in their Chester County home in a municipality that on Sunday still had some of the highest numbers of power outages in the region. On their fifth consecutive day without the convenience of electricity on Knox Road, Kate Parker was making Spaghetti Os on their gas stove to feed her 14-year-old son, Tom, and his friend Fin Monahan.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
IF A TREE falls in the yard but no one is around to claim it, does it have a keeper? That's the question the Daily News asked yesterday, following a record number of downed trees in the wake of this week's snow-and-ice storm. Many in the city were lucky to escape the power outages that affected swaths of the city and badly hit the suburbs - but those with saplings and shrubbery around their homes had a different experience. "It's tough because we can't control the fact we have so many trees, but it's very dangerous during storms like this," said Noreen Spota, administrative coordinator for the Chestnut Hill Community Association.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
With public dissatisfaction mounting, Peco Energy Co. on Thursday mobilized an unprecedented emergency response to restore service to hundreds of thousands of customers who lost power in Wednesday's ice storm. Peco said 1,600 workers from utilities as far away as Arkansas and Canada were expected to arrive Friday to join the 3,500 employees and contractors already on the ground. The force of more than 5,000 workers would be a third larger than Peco's response to Hurricane Sandy in 2012, which caused more outages.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Montgomery County declared a state of emergency around 3 p.m. Wednesday, due to mounting power outages and damage from an ice storm. Commissioner Josh Shapiro said 187,000 Peco customers - about two-thirds of the county - were without power. Many county buildings, including the Willow Grove Annex, the Youth Center's shelter school and some of the county's designated warming stations, were in the dark. But there are other buildings ahead of them on the repair list - such asike Abington Memorial Hospital, which Shapiro said "is in dire need of getting back online and off the generators.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Rita Giordano and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writers
CHERRY HILL When Cindy Weinberger arrived at the Motor Vehicle Services office in Cherry Hill about 9:45 a.m. Thursday, her feeling was akin to somebody who had scored a winning lottery ticket. Lots of parking spots! Free seats in the waiting area! Then she found out why: The state's computers were down. Closing in on 11:30, she was still waiting. "It's terrible," said the 48-year-old respiratory therapist from Cherry Hill. "It's usually a two-hour wait anyway. It fools you when you see no people here.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Thomas Hylton
This is the time of year trees are most appreciated. Streets and parks fill with walkers, joggers, and bicyclists enjoying the transformation from brown to green. Students gather outside their schools to plant saplings. Budding branches everywhere invigorate our senses and lift our souls. Utilitarian entities like power companies, also, should love trees. Cities and towns become heat islands in the summers. Urban temperatures are considerably higher than surrounding suburbs, caused by the thousands of rooftops, jam-packed along miles of streets, interspersed with acres of parking lots, all absorbing the heat of the sun. By cooling the air beneath them, urban trees reduce the need for air conditioning.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2013 | By Jonathan Fahey, Associated Press
America's power grid is like an old car. It gets the job done, but the repair bills go up every year, and experts say only a major overhaul will reverse its decline. An Associated Press analysis of utility spending and reliability nationwide found that electric customers are spending 43 percent more than they did in 2002 to build and maintain local electric infrastructure. Since then, power outages have remained infrequent, but when the lights go out, it takes longer to get them back on. Neither the spending nor the reliability trends is dramatic on its own. But experts say the combination is revealing: It suggests that extra money from electric customers isn't being spent wisely, or that utilities are not investing nearly enough to upgrade fragile equipment increasingly threatened by major storms.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | Associated Press
DAMASCUS, Syria - A power outage plunged Damascus and southern Syria into darkness late Saturday, Syria's state news agency said, while anti-regime activists reported a string of tit-for-tat, sectarian kidnappings in the country's north. The news agency, SANA, quoted Electricity Minister Imad Khamis as saying that the failure of a high-voltage line had left the country's south without power. The blackout affected the capital, Damascus, and the southern provinces of Daraa and Sweida, which abut Jordan.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul P. Leufkens was chatting Tuesday afternoon in his office at the KEMA-Powertest lab in Chalfont when a blast outside the building shook the walls, and a blinding flash lit up the window. "People sometimes ask if the explosions frighten me," said Leufkens, president of the lab. "Actually, I'm scared when we don't feel these shots. " They get paid to blow things up at KEMA-Powertest, the largest independent high-power electrical-testing facility in America. No explosions means no business.
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