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October 5, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Bernard Hopkins' win over Felix Trinidad for the undisputed middleweight title was the biggest pay-per-view fight of the year. The 475,000 buys Saturday night for the bout carried by HBO's pay-per-view arm topped the previous high for 2001 - the 400,000 for Oscar De La Hoya's victory over Javier Castillejo for the WBC super welterweight belt on June 23. There were 315,000 buys from cable systems and 160,000 satellite buys. The price varied between $45 and $50. HBO will replay the Hopkins-Trinidad bout at 10 p.m. tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer TV Writer
If you are a fan of boxer Sugar Ray Leonard or wrestler Hulk Hogan, pay- per-view (PPV) must seem like a television viewer's dream come true. PPV is the only place you could have seen Leonard fight Thomas Hearns in 1989 and Marvin Hagler in 1987, and it is the video arena where the Hulkster grapples with his biggest-name mat foes. Unfortunately for pay-per-view, Leonard doesn't fight often enough to guarantee a profit for the industry all by himself, and very few other boxers even approach him as a marquee name.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1994 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Some of the most popular recent movies won't be popping up on cable pay- per-view channels as quickly as before. The reason: Hollywood is gambling that delaying the pay-per-view debuts of such top movies as Sleepless in Seattle and The Firm will mean that video-rental stores can expect greater demand and therefore will buy more copies. The question of timing between a movie's home-video release and its pay- per-view date (the PPV window, in industry jargon) is crucial. Studios that have financial interests in the cable industry, such as Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1993 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
1992 was a disappointing year for the pay-per-view television industry, say PPV experts. But they expect 1993 to be better, mostly because of the new heavyweight boxing champion, Riddick Bowe. The industry hopes that Bowe can be built up into an attraction comparable to former heavyweight king Mike Tyson, whose absence from the ring last year showed up negatively on PPV's bottom line. Tyson began serving a six-year sentence for rape in Indiana on March 25. Other traditional nonmovie attractions on PPV, notably wrestling and musical concerts, continue to attract their devotees.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer TV Writer
Pay-per-view television, dominated by boxing and wrestling, has had far more busts than booms. Now, although wrestling appears to be slumping, Seth Abraham believes that boxing is on the rise. Abraham is president of Time Warner Sports, which on April 19 premiered a new pay-per-view (PPV) service, TVKO, which presents a card of boxing bouts each month. The next one, at 10 tomorrow night at a price of $19.95, is a middleweight title bout in Atlantic City between Mike McCallum, the World Boxing Association champion, and James Toney, International Boxing Federation champ.
NEWS
June 23, 1995 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a professional wrestling program Sunday evening at the CoreStates Spectrum, but most of the people watching it won't be even remotely close to Philadelphia. That's because the event, a World Wrestling Federation spectacular called the "King of the Ring Tournament," is one of those pay-per-view things. You know, those licenses for sports and music promoters to print money. And while p.p.v. revenue greatly outstrips that of arena ticket sales, for fans there's nothing like actually being there.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2012 | Reprinted from Wednesday's editions. By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Hit & Run has the look and feel of a vanity project. Like someone was willing to bankroll the wish of Hollywood couple Dax Shepard and Kristen Bell to work together on a film. They just weren't willing to sink a whole lot of money into it. That's not to say this shoestring cross between one of Burt Reynolds' old muscle-car movies and the blue satire of Reno 911 is without its charm and its laughs. It's just that if Shepard hadn't been able to coax friends like Bradley Cooper into participating, Hit & Run would be opening on PPV. Bell ( Forgetting Sarah Marshall)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2001 | by Michael "Mad Dog" Tearson Daily News Pro Wrestling Writer
World Championship Wrestling is going on hiatus. After the March 26 "Nitro" in Panama City, Florida, no new shows will be broadcast and no live events will be staged. According to a memo distributed to WCW staff on March 16 the promotion will "review its programming plans and determine the course of future WCW-branded entertainment events" during the time off. Next comes word WCW may lose its coveted timeslots on Turner Broadcasting System Inc. channels TBS and TNT. Jamie Kellner, newly named TBS Inc. chairman and CEO, may have dealt the deal's fatal blow by indicating that he has no interest in maintaining WCW's slots.
SPORTS
April 10, 1997 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
The postponement of the May 3 heavyweight rematch between Evander Holyfield and Mike Tyson figures to pay off handsomely for two of boxing's finest smaller fighters. Lead promoter Bob Arum has been predicting record non-heavyweight pay-per-view sales for Saturday's WBC welterweight title bout between champion Pernell Whitaker and challenger Oscar De La Hoya, the WBC super lightweight champ who is stepping up to 147 pounds for the first time. And that was even before Tuesday's announcement that Holyfield-Tyson II had been pushed back to June 28 because of a cut above the left eye Tyson sustained in training.
SPORTS
September 11, 2000 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
It's a variation of an old joke, but did you hear the one about the 13,000 people who showed up here for a world championship boxing match only to have a New Orleans Saints game break out? Roy Jones Jr.'s much-hyped light-heavyweight title defense against North Philadelphia native Eric Harding Saturday night had some of the sights and all of the sounds of most Sunday-afternoon exercises in futility involving the Saints, who somehow have managed to play 33 NFL seasons without winning a single playoff game.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2012 | Reprinted from Wednesday's editions. By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Hit & Run has the look and feel of a vanity project. Like someone was willing to bankroll the wish of Hollywood couple Dax Shepard and Kristen Bell to work together on a film. They just weren't willing to sink a whole lot of money into it. That's not to say this shoestring cross between one of Burt Reynolds' old muscle-car movies and the blue satire of Reno 911 is without its charm and its laughs. It's just that if Shepard hadn't been able to coax friends like Bradley Cooper into participating, Hit & Run would be opening on PPV. Bell ( Forgetting Sarah Marshall)
SPORTS
October 5, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Bernard Hopkins' win over Felix Trinidad for the undisputed middleweight title was the biggest pay-per-view fight of the year. The 475,000 buys Saturday night for the bout carried by HBO's pay-per-view arm topped the previous high for 2001 - the 400,000 for Oscar De La Hoya's victory over Javier Castillejo for the WBC super welterweight belt on June 23. There were 315,000 buys from cable systems and 160,000 satellite buys. The price varied between $45 and $50. HBO will replay the Hopkins-Trinidad bout at 10 p.m. tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2001 | by Michael "Mad Dog" Tearson Daily News Pro Wrestling Writer
WRESTLEMANIA X-SEVEN, 8 p.m. Sunday, Pay-Per-View. WrestleMania. Professional wrestling's biggest night. And the road to Mania X-Seven ends at a sold-out Houston Astrodome before 65,000 screaming fans 8 p.m. Sunday. Year in, year out, WrestleMania is one of cable's top-selling Pay-Per-View events. Many years it is No. 1. With the stunning news of the WWF's purchase of archrival WCW, wrestling enters a new era, and Mania X-Seven is the new era's first big show. Talk about timing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2001 | by Michael "Mad Dog" Tearson Daily News Pro Wrestling Writer
World Championship Wrestling is going on hiatus. After the March 26 "Nitro" in Panama City, Florida, no new shows will be broadcast and no live events will be staged. According to a memo distributed to WCW staff on March 16 the promotion will "review its programming plans and determine the course of future WCW-branded entertainment events" during the time off. Next comes word WCW may lose its coveted timeslots on Turner Broadcasting System Inc. channels TBS and TNT. Jamie Kellner, newly named TBS Inc. chairman and CEO, may have dealt the deal's fatal blow by indicating that he has no interest in maintaining WCW's slots.
SPORTS
September 11, 2000 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
It's a variation of an old joke, but did you hear the one about the 13,000 people who showed up here for a world championship boxing match only to have a New Orleans Saints game break out? Roy Jones Jr.'s much-hyped light-heavyweight title defense against North Philadelphia native Eric Harding Saturday night had some of the sights and all of the sounds of most Sunday-afternoon exercises in futility involving the Saints, who somehow have managed to play 33 NFL seasons without winning a single playoff game.
SPORTS
April 10, 1997 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
The postponement of the May 3 heavyweight rematch between Evander Holyfield and Mike Tyson figures to pay off handsomely for two of boxing's finest smaller fighters. Lead promoter Bob Arum has been predicting record non-heavyweight pay-per-view sales for Saturday's WBC welterweight title bout between champion Pernell Whitaker and challenger Oscar De La Hoya, the WBC super lightweight champ who is stepping up to 147 pounds for the first time. And that was even before Tuesday's announcement that Holyfield-Tyson II had been pushed back to June 28 because of a cut above the left eye Tyson sustained in training.
SPORTS
August 18, 1995 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Today's Sports Business 101 lesson: For guaranteed pay-per-view success, sign up Mike Tyson for a fight. Tyson, as we know, doesn't work cheap. The recommended price from Showtime Event Television (SET) to order the Tyson comeback fight tomorrow night against Peter McNeeley is $45.95. Despite such a hefty tariff, the fight likely will be a record-breaker. Joe Hand Sr., who operates a Philadelphia-based closed-circuit TV business with his son, Joe Jr., expects the Tyson-McNeeley bout to top the pay-per-view record of 1.3 million homes set by George Foreman vs. Evander Holyfield on April 19, 1991.
SPORTS
July 26, 1995 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
It'll be Mike Tyson vs. Riddick Bowe and Evander Holyfield Nov. 4 in what, from a television standpoint, figures to be the greatest heavyweight showdown of all time. Tyson's actual opponent that night at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, in his second comeback bout after serving a three-year prison sentence for rape, figures to be one of two fringe contenders, Buster Mathis Jr. or Lou Savarese. Bowe and Holyfield, meanwhile, will square off at the same time on the same date in their much-anticipated rubber match just down the street at Caesars Palace.
NEWS
June 23, 1995 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a professional wrestling program Sunday evening at the CoreStates Spectrum, but most of the people watching it won't be even remotely close to Philadelphia. That's because the event, a World Wrestling Federation spectacular called the "King of the Ring Tournament," is one of those pay-per-view things. You know, those licenses for sports and music promoters to print money. And while p.p.v. revenue greatly outstrips that of arena ticket sales, for fans there's nothing like actually being there.
SPORTS
December 12, 1994 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
It was billed as "Judgment Day in Monterrey," but promoter Don King's latest pay-per-view extravaganza left little to the hands of the judges. Of the 14 bouts on a card that proved that maybe there can be too much of a good thing, 13 ended in technical knockouts, with only an inconsequential eight-rounder going the distance. The result was 144 scheduled rounds compacted into 60. Even with all the quick finishes - six fights were terminated inside of three rounds, including three first-rounders - the action dragged on for nearly nine hours in the chilly air Saturday night at Estadia de Beisbol Monterrey.
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