CollectionsPreferences
IN THE NEWS

Preferences

FEATURED ARTICLES
REAL_ESTATE
July 25, 1999 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Smart growth is a phrase on everyone's lips these days, but as with most politically charged catchphrases, it can have a variety of interpretations. As articulated by Vice President Gore and others, smart growth means matching housing to jobs, easing traffic gridlock, and preserving open space. The meaning for municipal planning and zoning authorities might be no growth at all, because the cost of providing municipal services, including education, to residents usually exceeds the revenue from property taxes, no matter how much homeowners are willing to pay. These municipalities prefer commercial and industrial growth, which provide much and require less.
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Dave Davies contributed to this report
By declining Monday to hear a challenge to California's ban on race- or sex-based preferences, the U.S. Supreme Court has added ammunition to efforts nationwide to kill affirmative-action programs. Philadelphia has been hit hard. But its attempts to ensure awarding of public contracts to businesses owned by women and minorities are not dead. The city is in an uneasy cease- fire, as the Rendell administration gears up to write a new affirmative-action policy to replace the one that was struck down in 1989.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
John Sullivan is a lawyer with the Project on Civil Rights and Public Contracting Roger Clegg is president and general counsel of the Center for Equal Opportunity Supporters of racial and gender preferences in public contracting claim that preferences are needed because, without them, few contracts would go to minority- or women-owned firms. But a study recently done for Charlotte, N.C., reached exactly the opposite conclusion. After race and gender preferences ended, work awarded to minority- and women-owned businesses increased.
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | By Donna St. George, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
To become a county police officer in Louisville, Ky., an applicant must pass all sorts of tests. One of them is a written exam, and to pass the one given in April, whites needed a score of 92. Blacks needed a 73. When word of the disparity got out, the local newspaper wrote about "preferences," white candidates protested, the union threatened to sue and J. Alphonso Brown shook his head in disgust. "I said if that's what affirmative action means to you, you can keep your affirmative action plan," said Brown, a Louisville businessman and black Republican who sits on the federal Glass Ceiling Commission.
REAL_ESTATE
March 3, 1991 | By Michael L. Rozansky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anton C. Nelessen, urban planner, sat in his darkened office contrasting two slides projected on the wall. On one side was a picturesque one-way street in Boston's Back Bay area lined with three-story houses, brick sidewalks, trees and shrubs. The other side showed a contemporary townhouse development that was in Virginia but could have been anywhere, a cluster of identical units plunked down on a barren street. "It's all asphalt because there are no sidewalks," Nelessen said.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Donna St. George of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
A profoundly divided Supreme Court, echoing the widespread discontent with affirmative action programs, made it tougher yesterday to defend many federal programs that give preferences to racial minorities. Splitting 5-4 along ideological lines, the justices said that to pass constitutional muster, any race-based affirmative action program must be "narrowly tailored" to further "compelling governmental interests. " That is a more severe standard than the one applied in 1980 by retired liberal Justice William J. Brennan Jr. He gave Congress leeway to enact affirmative action programs that were "substantially related" to an "important governmental objective," such as enhancing diversity.
NEWS
August 10, 2004
GEORGE W. BUSH didn't idly sit by when the University of Michigan's policy of racial preferences in admissions was being argued before the U.S. Supreme Court last year. He sent out the U.S. Justice Department to oppose Michigan's "anti-merit" admissions policy. So imagine our surprise last week after he was cornered by a columnist who got him to say he also opposes "legacy" preferences like the one he got as the son of a Yale alumnus when he was accepted at the Ivy League school.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | Associated Press
Following is a breakdown, as of Friday, of the presidential preferences of delegates to the Democratic and Republican national conventions. The preferences are based on actual delegates' public statements or binding state laws or party rules. The Democrats' super delegates - which include governors, and members of Congress and the party's National Committee - are included in the totals. DEMOCRATIC Bill Clinton 2,511.75 Paul Tsongas 551 Jerry Brown 608.25 Uncommitted 498 Other . 29 Total 4,198 Needed to nominate 2,145.
NEWS
September 3, 2009
TATTOOS ARE beautiful and significant artwork adorned on a body. Instead of judging others for their preferences, why doesn't your letter-writer fix the government and worry about himself? I'm sure there are worse things in life than criticizing someone for tattoos. Being in the medical field, I have to cover up just because I need to make sure I respect each patient the same. Blah! Theresa A. Collins Philadelphia
BUSINESS
October 3, 1986 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of the Federal Communications Commission came under heavy fire yesterday at a congressional hearing for suggesting that minorities and women should not be given preferences for broadcast licenses. For years, the FCC has encouraged the ownership of radio and television stations by minority and female investors by offering credits that gave them an edge over whites or males in the licensing process. But a federal court has thrown out the FCC's preference policy for women and harshly criticized the minority preference policy.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2016 | Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
In recent weeks, the postings on Craigslist have taken on a desperate tone: "Looking for two tickets for . . . Jan 12th. Willing to negotiate price. " "In search of 1 ticket. . . . Price negotiable!" "Forgot to purchase, and they are now sold out. Please email or text if have tickets. " These hot tickets were for, of all places, the Franklin Institute - more specifically, Science After Hours, the museum's monthly, no-kids-allowed science rave. More than 2,600 people bought tickets for the Tuesday-night event, a speakeasy-theme gathering focused on the science of booze and bootlegging.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
PENNSYLVANIA is a decrepit old train, sputtering along in the wrong direction, with a bunch of hapless politicians behind the controls. Those were some of the takeaways of a new Daily News/ Franklin & Marshall College poll of 614 registered voters in the state. The poll results, which will be made public today, show that 62 percent of voters believe the state is on the wrong track, an eight-point increase from just two months ago. Government and politicians were identified as the state's biggest problems by 39 percent of voters.
NEWS
October 7, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Like their counterparts elsewhere, Pennsylvania Republicans would prefer that the party's 2016 presidential nominee be a political outsider, according to a poll released Monday by Mercyhurst College in Erie. Fifty-seven percent say it is "important" that the next nominee come from outside the normal political pipeline, the poll finds. "Republicans in the state are expressing a great deal of dissatisfaction with Washington," said Joseph Morris, director of the Mercyhurst Center for Applied Politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: My fiance likes to touch me in certain ways that I'm not a big fan of. Nothing superintrusive; more like where the hands go when we spoon. He says it makes him feel bonded and close to me. And I get that. Except I don't like the physical feeling, and at times, I feel objectified. Sometimes, I can appreciate it as a reaching out for an intimate connection. Sometimes, I resent that he's ignoring my preferences, and so the same act that makes him feels close to me makes me feel distant from him. I know you're going to ask if he has a habit of ignoring my preferences; he doesn't.
SPORTS
February 25, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kevin DeCaesar always wanted to play football for a Division I program. He will get his chance at Temple University. A first-team all-South Jersey linebacker as a senior, DeCaesar has decided to attend Temple and try to make the Owls' roster as a preferred walk-on. "I know it's going to be a challenge," DeCaesar said. "These players are no joke. I know I'm going to have to work hard, a lot harder than I've ever worked. " DeCaesar was a three-year starter at linebacker for West Deptford.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As they flock to urban areas, members of the so-called millennial generation are discovering that they prefer to get around by public transit, biking, or walking instead of driving, according to a report promoted Wednesday at Rutgers University's Camden, New Brunswick, and Newark campuses. "It's basically just saying that transportation investment should be used to accommodate us millennials much more, because we're going to be the people using them in the future," said Rutgers-Camden freshman Samantha Buchner, 18, a member of New Jersey Public Interest Research Group, which held the campus news events.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before Gov. Christie visited her first-grade classroom, Mary Stahl told the 6- and 7-year-olds how special the coming moment would be. "Someday, you'll remember this day, the day the governor came to your classroom," she told the eager children, who paused their counting lesson to greet Christie. If recent history is any indication, Christie may return sooner than they think. He visited Octavius V. Catto Family School earlier this year and returned Tuesday to celebrate back-to-school, and, more broadly, to juxtapose Camden's "cooperative spirit" with the situation in Newark, where students boycotted the first day of school in a city far more politically divided over changes to the school system.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Going into the U.S.- Belgium soccer game Tuesday, social-media spies sorting tens of millions of Facebook, Twitter, and other posts for SAP AG found that the American team, led by goaltender Tim Howard , was viewed more positively than negatively. Several of the Belgians attracted more social haters than lovers, especially midfielder Marouane Fellaini , even though he scored a goal for Belgium against Algeria. Are American fans less critical? No. U.S. players got negative ratings last week, when Portugal tied the team in the last minutes, says SAP's Evan Welsh . But the American starters won back fans just by surviving the "Group of Death" to advance and face Belgium, said Welsh.
SPORTS
April 25, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
SIXERS OWNER Josh Harris recently deemed his team's 19-63 season a "huge success. " A lot of fans called it "tanking. " NBA commissioner Adam Silver prefers to call it "rebuilding. " "I don't think rebuilding should be a dirty word," he said yesterday at the Associated Press Sports Editors commissioners meetings in New York. "I think it's necessary in any business. I think bad teams have to make their own strategic decisions. That's not something we're looking to legislate from the league.
NEWS
November 29, 2013 | By Steve and Mia
Q: No matter what I do in bed, my girlfriend's never satisfied. I've tried all kinds of stuff. She just lays there looking bored afterward. Sometimes, she even reaches for a vibrator. I've tried talking with her about it, but nothing works. Before we moved in together, we couldn't keep our hands off one another. We did it a couple times a week. Now when we have sex, it's like she's doing me a favor. Then she reaches for that thing again. It's not like I'm one of those guys who just takes.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|