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NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: What's the best way to involve my husband in my pregnancy so he doesn't feel left out? He's a very hands-on type who loses interest in anything he can't sink his teeth into, and I'm afraid he won't believe we're really having a baby until the child is actually born. Answer: Is there anything wrong with that? You say "left out," but I'm not sure how one can both lose interest and feel left out. It sounds more as though he's just not that interested right now - meaning you feel a little lonely.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Susan Saint James of Kate & Allie and Phylicia Rashad of The Cosby Show this season are continuing one of television's newest traditions: series actresses working well into their pregnancies. In past decades, a pregnant star was virtually unseen on TV, with Lucille Ball back in the '50s the most memorable exception. But within the last three seasons, seven actresses have changed this pattern by continuing to work until the last month or two of their widely publicized pregnancies.
LIVING
November 16, 1986 | By Linda Herskowitz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harriet and David held their baby daughter, Amy, for 15 minutes one extraordinary afternoon in May. They counted her fingers and toes and examined all her features to see whether she was normal. She was a little longer than her mother's hand and hardly heavier than a Barbie doll. The baby's face, Harriet thought, was all David; the baby's body was long and slim, like Harriet's. How well formed she was, Harriet thought. The baby was perfect, except Harriet had lost her in the 16th week of pregnancy.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
He's just 2 1/2 inches long, with little fingers and a heartbeat that flickers on the ultrasound screen. He flip-flops around in his mother's womb, such a tiny being that she can't feel his movement. Yet, Virginia Connolly, 35, eagerly tracks her son's every turn. With the black and white pictures of the ultrasound screen, she quips, he'll have a photo album started even before birth. Through a procedure available in Chester County only at the Chester County Hospital, and performed by a team from the Pennsylvania Hospital, Connolly was reassured early in her pregnancy that her son would be born without genetic abnormalities.
NEWS
January 15, 1997 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer
It was the secret of her life. Arnetta Stewart had already become a teen mom. She couldn't tell her older sister, who was raising her, she was pregnant again at 18. So she lied. She ate more to explain her bulging belly. She wore baggy clothes. When her water broke, she told her cousin that she had kidney trouble. Minutes later, she gave birth to a 7-pound-9-ounce baby girl on the kitchen floor of her cousin's home. The daughter, Shawnetta Stewart, is now an 18-year-old basketball star at Rutgers.
NEWS
May 11, 2005 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In what was billed as a Mother's Day gift, the Pennsylvania House yesterday unanimously approved a bill designed to improve care for women suffering from depression during or after pregnancy. The Prenatal and Postpartum Counseling Act would require doctors or midwives to give pregnant women information about the symptoms of prenatal depression, postpartum depression and psychosis and tell them where counseling is available. The bill must pass the Senate and be signed by Gov. Rendell to become law. News last year of a young woman who stabbed her toddler and left her in a West Philadelphia schoolyard prompted Rep. George Kenney (R., Phila.
NEWS
December 9, 1986 | BY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
The latest outrage of American life: the pill goes to school. There are now 72 "comprehensive health clinics" in or near the nation's public high schools. Very comprehensive. More than a quarter dispense and more than half prescribe birth-control devices. When the New York City Board of Education found out that two of its clinics were in the dispensing business, it ordered them to cease and desist. Secretary of Education William Bennett has waxed eloquent on the subject. He is surely right that birth control in the schools legitimatizes sexual activity and represents an "abdication of moral authority.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Maybe Tom Smith just wanted us to remember his name. Or realize he's the Pennsylvania Republican running for the U.S. Senate. Or perhaps he's jealous of headline-hogging Todd Akin, that Missouri master of creative obstetrics, and wanted his own moment in the sun and on this paper's front page. In any event, Smith finally made news Monday by comparing unintended pregnancy to rape. Specifically, his daughter's unintended pregnancy to rape, after a Harrisburg press luncheon in front of a group of reporters.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
From the column archives.   Question: I recently learned we are pregnant with our third baby, the same gender as the other two. Husband is very disappointed that we aren't having his gender preference, and I am, too, a bit, but mostly trying to stay positive. Husband went from being superexcited about the pregnancy, and suggesting I "take it easy" and get pedicures, offering to cook, etc., to standard basic help around the house. He never asks how I am feeling or offers to step up his help.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A year after agreeing to settle thousands of lawsuits over side effects of Norplant birth-control implants, Wyeth-Ayerst Pharmaceuticals is warning doctors not to use implant kits shipped since October 1999 because they may not be potent enough to prevent pregnancy. The St. Davids pharmaceutical firm, a division of American Home Products Corp., says patients already using the questionable implants should consider a backup contraceptive method if "the avoidance of pregnancy is of great importance.
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