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Pregnancy

NEWS
April 19, 1987 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
He's just 2 1/2 inches long, with little fingers and a heartbeat that flickers on the ultrasound screen. He flip-flops around in his mother's womb, such a tiny being that she can't feel his movement. Yet, Virginia Connolly, 35, eagerly tracks her son's every turn. With the black and white pictures of the ultrasound screen, she quips, he'll have a photo album started even before birth. Through a procedure available in Chester County only at the Chester County Hospital, and performed by a team from the Pennsylvania Hospital, Connolly was reassured early in her pregnancy that her son would be born without genetic abnormalities.
NEWS
January 15, 1997 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer
It was the secret of her life. Arnetta Stewart had already become a teen mom. She couldn't tell her older sister, who was raising her, she was pregnant again at 18. So she lied. She ate more to explain her bulging belly. She wore baggy clothes. When her water broke, she told her cousin that she had kidney trouble. Minutes later, she gave birth to a 7-pound-9-ounce baby girl on the kitchen floor of her cousin's home. The daughter, Shawnetta Stewart, is now an 18-year-old basketball star at Rutgers.
NEWS
May 11, 2005 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In what was billed as a Mother's Day gift, the Pennsylvania House yesterday unanimously approved a bill designed to improve care for women suffering from depression during or after pregnancy. The Prenatal and Postpartum Counseling Act would require doctors or midwives to give pregnant women information about the symptoms of prenatal depression, postpartum depression and psychosis and tell them where counseling is available. The bill must pass the Senate and be signed by Gov. Rendell to become law. News last year of a young woman who stabbed her toddler and left her in a West Philadelphia schoolyard prompted Rep. George Kenney (R., Phila.
NEWS
December 9, 1986 | BY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
The latest outrage of American life: the pill goes to school. There are now 72 "comprehensive health clinics" in or near the nation's public high schools. Very comprehensive. More than a quarter dispense and more than half prescribe birth-control devices. When the New York City Board of Education found out that two of its clinics were in the dispensing business, it ordered them to cease and desist. Secretary of Education William Bennett has waxed eloquent on the subject. He is surely right that birth control in the schools legitimatizes sexual activity and represents an "abdication of moral authority.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Maybe Tom Smith just wanted us to remember his name. Or realize he's the Pennsylvania Republican running for the U.S. Senate. Or perhaps he's jealous of headline-hogging Todd Akin, that Missouri master of creative obstetrics, and wanted his own moment in the sun and on this paper's front page. In any event, Smith finally made news Monday by comparing unintended pregnancy to rape. Specifically, his daughter's unintended pregnancy to rape, after a Harrisburg press luncheon in front of a group of reporters.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A year after agreeing to settle thousands of lawsuits over side effects of Norplant birth-control implants, Wyeth-Ayerst Pharmaceuticals is warning doctors not to use implant kits shipped since October 1999 because they may not be potent enough to prevent pregnancy. The St. Davids pharmaceutical firm, a division of American Home Products Corp., says patients already using the questionable implants should consider a backup contraceptive method if "the avoidance of pregnancy is of great importance.
LIVING
September 27, 1987 | By Dick Polman, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Something's wrong with the feet. " Joan Blum got the news right away, from the doctor who delivered her baby. Fred Blum saw for himself that something was wrong. He had brought his camera to the delivery room at Pennsylvania Hospital - "overwhelmed with having a child," he later recalled - and wound up photographing a newborn boy with clubfeet. Life hasn't been the same for the Blums since that day, Sept. 15, 1980. Despite three operations, Jeffrey Blum can't walk like a normal child - he moves only with the aid of braces - and there is no guarantee that further surgery will correct the problem.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | By Mark Thompson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Women summoned to serve in the Persian Gulf war were three times as likely as men to be found medically unfit to go, according to a new Pentagon report. "This is the first time the difference has been documented," Lt. Col. Doug Hart said yesterday. "We didn't have an anticipated answer - we just didn't know. " The report said that 9 percent of women called to duty - compared with less than 3 percent of men - could not be sent to the Middle East for medical reasons. The bulk of the difference was due to pregnancy, the study found.
NEWS
April 20, 1997 | By Geoff Mulvihill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Arline Tornberg didn't think she really needed it, but when she saw a pink sign with a blue silhouette of a round-bellied woman and the words "Preferred Parking" above a prime spot at the Shop Rite, she wheeled in her Ford Explorer. Reserving parking places for mothers-to-be next to the spaces for handicapped people is a new idea at local stores, and it's a luxury some mothers such as Tornberg say they find handy. At the Shop Rite in East Gate Square, along the Moorestown-Mount Laurel border, the signs went up in the last few weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
EDWARD MAY have gotten the girl, but it's Jacob who is the shape-shifting spirit of the "Twilight" movie franchise. A third of the audience views the movies as a wildly satisfying romance, a third views them as hilarious comedy, and another third is somehow content to see the movies jump back and forth between these opposing forms. Everybody seems deliriously happy. To sit at a screening is to hear sighs and snickers occurring almost at once - something the filmmakers appear to understand, and to play without shame or adherence to rules of tone or internal logic.
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