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Pregnancy

ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I have a problem I am not proud of. My daughter is pregnant, and, so far, everything in her pregnancy is routine. When I was pregnant with our three kids, my husband was typical for our generation in terms of the involvement he showed during my pregnancy and even my kids' infant years. But now that our daughter is pregnant, he has shown more interest in her than pretty much every pregnancy I had combined. He downloaded an app for his phone that gives weekly updates of the baby's size, changed all his photos to the ultrasound photo, and even spent hours researching car seats for our car so we can drive the baby around.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: A friend confided that she is pregnant and feeling decidedly unexcited about it. Her current life checks all of the boxes for "ready for baby" - including a lovely, excited husband. She doesn't seem depressed, just reasonably apprehensive about how much her life is about to change and whether she is ready for a child. What is the best way to be a supportive friend in this situation? I don't have children myself, and all of my previously pregnant friends have been excited about their pregnancies - even as they expressed reasonable reservations about childbirth, never sleeping again, the usual.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a pregnancy test that is biodegradable and can be flushed down the toilet. Bethany Edwards, CEO and co-founder of LIA Diagnostics, hopes her credit-card-sized device will become a force in the vast pregnancy home test market and be ready for sale online by the end of 2016. "Pregnancy test kits are one-time use and made of plastic so they aren't environmentally friendly," said Edwards, 30. "There's also no privacy in the current test kits as they can easily be discovered in the trash.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
People told them to forget about restaurant dinners and first-run movies. They cautioned that sleep would be a scarce commodity. They advised the couple to expect conflict in the first mind-spinning weeks of parenting. People said a lot of things. Abby and Brent decided to ignore most of them. "The biggest advice we decided not to listen to was people saying we wouldn't be able to do the same things as before," Abby says. That includes academia, activism and adventure racing, the couple's shared passion: an ultra-endurance sport that combines paddling, mountain-biking and trekking - while navigating only with a map and compass - in wilderness settings around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
When Mandy Edwards tells people that she has a 17-year-old son and a 5-month-old daughter, they assume the second baby was an accident. But they have it all wrong. It was the first pregnancy, the one that happened when Mandy was just 19 - a college sophomore, part-time model, and aspiring music writer - that was unplanned. It took five drugstore test kits and an ultrasound to convince her that she was actually pregnant. "When I found out I was going to have this baby, that changed things," she says.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hyphernkemberly Dorvilier kept her pregnancy a secret for months, hiding her growing stomach even from her mother and younger sister, with whom she shared a split-level Pemberton Township home. On Friday evening, Dorvilier delivered the girl - alone, authorities said - in the ground-floor bathroom, where police later found a bloody toilet and rag. She then allegedly walked to a green Land Rover in the driveway, leaving a trail of blood on the concrete, and drove a mile and a half with the baby to a neighborhood along Simontown Road.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thirty-six years after opening, the Birth Center in Bryn Mawr is booming and just celebrated a milestone - its 10,000th baby. In comparison, Pennsylvania Hospital, which has Philadelphia's largest maternity unit, delivers 10,000 babies every two years . Therein lies one of the biggest ironies of maternity care in the United States. Demand for midwife-led birthing centers - with their nurturing, low-tech, cost-saving approach to pregnancy and childbirth - has been growing like, well, a newborn.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By John Stern, M.D., For The Inquirer
Early in her pregnancy with her first baby, the 31-year-old nurse felt nauseated and began having pain in her lower right abdomen. Her obstetrician explained that during the first trimester, it is quite common to feel sick to your stomach and, in all likelihood, the sharp twinges came from ligaments stretching to accommodate the growing fetus. Weeks passed, and well into her second trimester, the woman still had trouble keeping food down. The pain on her lower right side subsided, but she flinched when anyone touched the upper right side of her belly.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For much of his 20-year career as a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, Anthony J. Sciscione has been criticizing something obstetricians routinely prescribe to try to prevent premature birth: bed rest. Counterintuitive as it may seem, studies consistently show that pregnant women who lay around for hours at a time, day after day, are just as likely to deliver too early as women who carry on with their normal activities. Now, Sciscione and like-minded iconoclasts are hammering the mounting evidence that activity restriction during pregnancy is not just unhelpful, but harmful.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
CALM DOWN, folks. Just calm down. Temporary Tattle is about to re-report a royal announcement, and she knows how touchy some readers are about the monarchy. So, it is with the utmost respect to the crown (God Save the Queen!) that I type news you knew already: Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (please note the perfect usage of title) have announced they're expecting a second child. The Duchess, whose first name I dare not shorten, lest I offend, is believed to be fewer than three months along.
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