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NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Daniel Estrin, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - A court on Monday ordered former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert to pay a fine and serve a one-year suspended sentence for his role in a corruption case that forced him from office, a relatively light punishment that could clear the way for a political comeback. Olmert, who had faced the possibility of jail or community service, was ordered only to pay an $18,000 fine. By avoiding those stiffer penalties, the former leader is now eligible to run for parliament, though he remains barred from serving in a cabinet post while he faces another corruption trial.
SPORTS
September 6, 1990 | By Bill Ordine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Buddy Ryan is proud of his defensive line. While Ryan believes there's always room for improvement, he will concede a large measure of satisfaction with the voracious wrecking crew that has become the team's foundation. "It's the best one in the league," Ryan said of his defensive line. "They're a force, there's no question about it. " Strangely, the defensive line's emergence as the premier front four in the NFL occurred during a season when Reggie White had a down year. White, a four- time Pro Bowler, had 11 sacks in 1989, which tied him for eighth in the NFC but was the lowest total of his NFL career.
SPORTS
March 19, 2009 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Healthy or not, Roman Catholic High School's Maalik Wayns is regarded as the area's premier boys' basketball player. A McDonald's all-American, the 17-year-old's court awareness, vision, skill and high basketball IQ separated him from most players on the court. Wayns' efforts did not go unnoticed despite his missing several games with a knee injury. The William Markward Memorial Basketball Club recognized the 6-foot-1 point guard yesterday as the top senior boys' basketball player in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
Pierre Mauroy, 84, who as France's prime minister in the early 1980s implemented radical social reforms that made life easier for French workers, has died. Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said Mr. Mauroy died Friday in a hospital in a Paris suburb. He had been suffering from cancer. Mr. Mauroy was prime minister from 1981 to 1984 under Socialist President Francois Mitterrand. His reforms included cutting the legal workweek, lowering the retirement age, and raising the number of paid holidays.
SPORTS
October 15, 1999 | By Melissa Geschwind, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The FC Delco under-18 club girls' soccer team, which includes players from Downingtown, West Chester East and West Chester Henderson high schools and is coached by Downingtown head coach Mary Schane, took home the top prize at last weekend's prestigious Washington Area Girls' Soccer tournament. Competing in the under-18 Premier flight, which represents the highest level of competition at the tournament, FC Delco beat California's San Ramon Crunch, 1-0, in the finals. Since the Premier flight is populated only by state champion and runner-up teams, FC Delco's title is akin to a national crown.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2008 | By Lesley Valdes FOR THE INQUIRER
A concert, like a story, knows when it wants to stop. Violinist James Ehnes' program for the Chamber Music Society of Philadelphia at the Perelman Theater Thursday had two extraordinary closes: the requisite pre-intermission climax - J.S. Bach's "Chaconne" (from the Partita No. 2 in D Minor) - and, in its local premier, the work that should have ended the evening, Aaron Jay Kernis' Two Movements (with Bells). It isn't often that 17 minutes of new music will hold the house's attention or make a critic wish to hear it again - and this on a World Series night when the home team was playing.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / VICKI VALERIO
A concert in the courtyard came courtesy of the Prague Philharmonic Children's Choir. The ensemble, under the direction of Jiri Chavala (center, right), stopped at City Hall yesterday during a tour of Philadelphia. The group's reputation as one of the world's premier choirs is growing, and many Czech composers have created works for the singers.
SPORTS
February 26, 2006 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The American Cup, one of gymnastics' premier international events, is scheduled to be held Saturday, beginning at 11:30 a.m. at Temple's Liacouras Center. The event is an all-around invitational that will feature some of the top male and female gymnasts in the world. This year's Cup is also the first premier international invitational in the United States to use the sport's new scoring system. In addition to the United States, the field is expected to include gymnasts from Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, Romania and Russia.
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer
The Goode administration might have ignored yet another early warning sign that all was not well with the MOVE reconstruction project. After four separate insurance-bond brokers turned down MOVE builder Ernest A. Edwards Jr.'s Premier Construction Co., Mayor Goode asked George Holbrook, president of Reliance Surety Co., to give Edwards a bond, Holbrook testified at Edwards' preliminary hearing yesterday. Edwards and his former partner, W. Oscar Harris, are charged with stealing more than $208,000 from funds for the project.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By Marc Freeman, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
To locate the origin of nearly half the salmon consumed by Americans, you would have to set sail for the cold waters near Denmark's Faeroe Islands, located southeast of Iceland. To see where large quantities of that salmon are later cleaned, brined, smoked, sliced and prepared daily for delivery to supermarkets, go no farther than Premier Smoked Fish Inc.'s modern processing plant in Lower Bucks County. As the largest fish factory of its kind on the East Coast outside New York City, Premier, of Bensalem Township, has swimmingly tried to bring smoked salmon and whitefish into the mainstream diet.
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NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first of PATCO's long-delayed refurbished railcars are now slated to begin service late next month, PATCO officials said Tuesday. Persistent signal problems have been solved, PATCO president John Hanson said, so the first eight cars in the 120-car fleet to be rebuilt in a $194 million program can finally carry paying passengers. The first cars will operate as two four-car trains during off-peak hours, PATCO general manager John Rink said. PATCO expects six more cars to be in service by late June and early July.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
WASHINGTON - Derogatory jokes about the viola are probably waiting to be made over the fact that Jennifer Higdon's concerto for that instrument sat for five years on a waiting list before arriving at its premiere Saturday at the Library of Congress. In truth, the Philadelphia composer was keen to give the ordinarily brooding instrument a levity other viola concertos lack, but first she had to finish her opera Cold Mountain . The concerto, written for violist and Curtis Institute president Roberto Diaz and the Curtis Chamber Orchestra, is ultimately concerned with getting down to essentials, yielding distinctive, under-the-surface strength.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The phone call from New York came in mid-October. Could the Moorestown Theater Company stage a world-premiere workshop production of a new children's musical - before Christmas? "We knew there were a lot of hurdles to clear, but we do that every day with every show," says director Mark Morgan, noting that MTC has 94 shows to its credit. Music Theatre International, which licenses productions of adult and junior versions of Broadway musicals, asked MTC to stage The Magic Tree House: A Ghost Tale for Mr. Dickens, Jr. "as a favor," Morgan says.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
J OHN DU PONT is a notorious name for longtime residents of the Philadelphia area who remember him killing Olympic wrestler Dave Schultz in 1996 at du Pont's Newtown Square compound. But neither director Bennett Miller , nor actor Anthony Michael Hall had heard of the case before starting work on the movie "Foxcatcher. " In fact, Miller only heard about it after a stranger handed him an envelope full of clips about the story at an event. The film held its Philadelphia premiere at the Prince Music Theater last night, where the likes of Greater Philadelphia Film Office's Sharon Pinkenson , negotiator on the du Pont case Anthony Paparo , Kal Rudman and Cozen O'Connor's Justin Wineburgh walked the red carpet.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
"FOXCATCHER," a film starring Steve Carell and Channing Tatum that dramatizes the Newtown Square-based murder of Olympic wrestler Dave Schultz , will have a red-carpet premiere in Philly on Monday. Anthony Michael Hall , the star of many a Brat Pack movie, including "The Breakfast Club" and "Sixteen Candles," will walk the red carpet, along with director Bennett Miller ("Capote," "Moneyball") and Schultz's widow, Nancy (played by Sienna Miller in the film)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* JANE THE VIRGIN. 9 tonight, CW57. * MARRY ME. 9 p.m. tomorrow, NBC10. A TV SHOW ABOUT a 23-year-old virgin who becomes accidentally pregnant in a doctor's office wouldn't be the first place I'd look for a thoughtful treatment of the emotional implications of abortion, adoption or single motherhood. But the CW's "Jane the Virgin" surprised me. In all the right ways. Smartly (and somewhat loosely) adapted from a Venezuelan telenovela, the show, premiering tonight, stars Gina Rodriguez ("Filly Brown")
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
*  GRACEPOINT . 9 tonight, Fox 29. *  BAD JUDGE . 9 tonight, NBC10. *  A TO Z . 9:30 tonight, NBC10. "THE BRITISH version was better. " As annoying a statement as any you'll find in TV criticism, it's not always true. I'd no longer argue that the American adaptation of "The Office" is inferior to the Ricky Gervais original, just different. Different, too, is Netflix's "House of Cards," which has moved further and further from the arch '90s trilogy starring Ian Richardson.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* HOMELAND. 9 p.m. Sunday, Showtime. * SURVIVOR'S REMORSE. 9 p.m. tomorrow, Starz. * MULANEY. 9:30 p.m. Sunday, Fox 29.   REMEMBER what Carrie Mathison was like before Sgt. Nicholas Brody entered her life? You probably don't, even if you've never missed an episode of Showtime's "Homeland," which returns for its fourth season on Sunday with a Carrie (Claire Danes) we've never really seen before, or at least one who's not necessarily the most screwed-up person in every room she enters.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* BLACK-ISH. 9:30 tonight, 6ABC.   SOMETIMES the best way to tell a universal story about family is to be as specific as possible. TV writers writing what they (and their stars) knew rather than what they'd already seen on television have brought us comedies like "Everybody Loves Raymond," "Everybody Hates Chris," "The Goldbergs" and even "Louie," where Louis C.K.'s picture of divorced parenthood has added nuance to that old "dads who date" genre. Which brings us to "Black-ish," the newest addition to ABC's Wednesday nights and one of several new shows the network's English-born entertainment chief, Paul Lee, sees as part of his mission to "reflect America.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
When is it acceptable for a mayor to strip off his pants on stage in front of a roomful of constituents? When the borough is Jenkintown, the mayor is Ed Foley , and the occasion is a Season Two premiere screening of ABC's hit show The Goldbergs. Under those circumstances Tuesday night, Foley's stunt - an homage to the show's Murray Goldberg, an irascible 1980s father who usually appears in tighty whiteys - got a huge round of applause from the crowd of nearly 300. The show is based on writer Adam F. Goldberg's childhood in Jenkintown.
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