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NEWS
June 5, 1986 | By Robin Kish, Special to The Inquirer
The Woodbury Heights Board of Education on Tuesday announced a $2,080 increase in the cost of its excess-liability insurance policy and said that it would go shopping for lower rates with the New Jersey School Board Association Insurance Board. But the school board indicated that it did not expect to maintain its $2 million in coverage at the old rate of $800 a year, and that taxpayers ultimately would have to pay more to provide insurance coverage for the staff of Woodbury Heights Elementary School and for the school board.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
The words bold and premium have attained prominent places in autodom's marketing mantra. Wherever you turn, there's an emphasis on bold exteriors and premium interiors. At the moment, Toyota is running a big ad campaign that extols the bold persona of the new Camry. Nissan is underscoring for car writers the more premium nature of the new Murano crossover's cabin. Not to be outdone, Kia keyed on both qualities when it showed its redesigned 2016 Sorento crossover at a recent press introduction.
NEWS
November 30, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
If you're in the individual market for health insurance and want to be covered by New Year's Day, you have until Dec. 15 to choose your plan on the Affordable Care Act exchange. Choosing a health plan is confusing, so it's understandable if you're tempted to just grab the lowest premium you can find. But don't do it. Depending on your family's income and health needs, you could come out ahead with a plan that has a higher monthly premium but that offers better coverage. That's why it's worth going over the last year's medical expenses, looking for items likely to come up again, such as prescriptions for chronic conditions.
NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Some people - likely those close to the federal poverty level - will be able to find insurance plans on the Affordable Care Act marketplace that are free. That's because subsidies help cover the costs, and they rise for poorer applicants. As many as 715,000 Pennsylvanians - or more than half of commonwealth residents shopping for insurance on the marketplace - are eligible for subsidies, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation report. But navigators, insurers, and industry analysts are urging people to consider their overall needs carefully before choosing a plan and not to be seduced by the idea of no or very low monthly premiums.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2012 | By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Millions of seniors enrolled in some of the most popular Medicare prescription drug plans face double-digit premium hikes next year if they don't shop for a better deal, says a private firm that analyzes the highly competitive market. Seven of the top 10 prescription plans are raising their premiums by 11 percent to 23 percent, according to a report this week by Avalere Health. It's a reality check on a stream of upbeat Medicare announcements from the Obama administration, all against the backdrop of a hard-fought election.
SPORTS
August 15, 2009 | From Daily News
This is a letter sent yesterday by the Eagles to their suiteholders and premium ticketholders: As you are aware, the Eagles confirmed last evening that we have signed Michael Vick to the team. You are our most valued customers and we understand that this decision may result in some personal soul searching for you, along with some public debate in the coming days and weeks. We do not want this to distract from the relationship we have with you, and we remain fully committed to putting the highest quality product on the field and delivering wins to Eagles fans.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Everyone was asking about premiums in the months before the rollout of the Affordable Care Act. But many people are mistaken if they think the premium represents the bottom-line cost of health insurance. It doesn't. Yes, the premium price is key. But it shouldn't necessarily be the decisive factor when shopping in the new marketplace. To find the real annual cost, add up the out-of-pocket costs, drug selection, and other parts of the drug benefit. "People should not be making decisions to buy a plan based on premiums alone," said Larry Levitt, senior vice president of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a health-policy research and communication group.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
If you're a Pennsylvania resident with Allstate Property & Casualty homeowners insurance, you may face an unpleasant surprise this fall: a sizable boost in your insurance premium. You can just suck it up - as Allstate undoubtedly expects most policyholders to do - or you can use it as a goad to do something you may find nearly as unpleasant: shop around for alternatives. It shouldn't have to be, as I'll explain. But first, a look at what's happening with Allstate. Citing what a spokeswoman calls "an unprecedented year with weather in Pennsylvania," Allstate has asked state officials to approve a plan that would raise premiums an average of 20 percent for the company's 195,000 policyholders - more than twice as steep an increase as sought by any other large insurer during the last six months, according to filings published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2004 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Subaru has long had a reputation in this country for selling rugged all-wheel-drive vehicles popular with outdoors types. Now, the Japanese carmaker's parent, Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd., wants to raise Subaru's image into the realm of premium-car brands - such as Audi, Volvo and Saab - without alienating loyal customers. Industry analysts said Subaru, which has its U.S. headquarters in Cherry Hill, was following a trend among automakers with middle-market brands. The goal is to charge more and increase profitability.
NEWS
July 25, 2014
YOU SAY you'd love premium seats for "The Book of Mormon," the Broadway smasheroo musical comedy that Tuesday begins a seven-week run at the Forrest Theater, but you simply can't swing (or justify) paying hundreds of dollars for a perch near the stage? Well, how does $27 sound? That's right, $27. Total. Heck, that's usually what you fork over for the laughably larcenous "fees" that are usually extorted from live entertainment consumers by ticketing agencies. And, no, they aren't counterfeit.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Captain Underpants is joining Comcast. The nation's cable giant agreed to acquire the money-losing studio DreamWorks Animation SKG for $3.8 billion, or $41 a share - a 51 percent premium to DreamWorks' closing share price on Tuesday, before news leaked of the deal. The multibillion-dollar deal for the studio that created the hugely popular Shrek franchise and the animated feature Captain Underpants bolsters Comcast's NBCUniversal unit and deepens its offerings in family entertainment.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Swiss insurer Zurich Insurance Group has acquired the 2.0 University Place office building near 41st and Market Streets for $420 a square foot - among the city's highest purchase prices ever for a commercial property. Zurich paid $41.3 million Tuesday for the five-story building in a deal that also commits the company to completing up to $1.8 million in interior construction work, developer Scott Mazo said. Mazo invested $31 million in the 98,000-square-foot eco-friendly office project at the largely untested western edge of Philadelphia's University City neighborhood.
NEWS
March 19, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Premium shock I have seen increases in health-insurance premiums and deductibles for my family. I have no idea why there was a huge increase over last year's rates ("In Pa. and N.J., Affordable Care Act is anything but," Monday). Certainly the old method of "let the insurance companies decide" didn't work. Now the Affordable Care Act isn't working. Is "Medicare for all" worth a try? |Diane Doyle, Quakertown, dibet@icloud.com
NEWS
November 30, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
If you're in the individual market for health insurance and want to be covered by New Year's Day, you have until Dec. 15 to choose your plan on the Affordable Care Act exchange. Choosing a health plan is confusing, so it's understandable if you're tempted to just grab the lowest premium you can find. But don't do it. Depending on your family's income and health needs, you could come out ahead with a plan that has a higher monthly premium but that offers better coverage. That's why it's worth going over the last year's medical expenses, looking for items likely to come up again, such as prescriptions for chronic conditions.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2015
If 80 is the new 60, then what will retirement look like in the future? As we live longer, the definition of old is changing. Americans generally feel that for their parents' generation, 62 was the age when someone became old, as it was also close to traditional retirement age. A September 2013 UBS Investor Watch report (the company tackles different topics every quarter), based on a survey of 2,319 U.S. investors with at least $250,000 in investable assets, found that only 31 percent of respondents in their 60s and 47 percent of respondents in their 70s said they felt old, while 77 percent of those in their 80s did. Social Security's latest data tend to back this up. According to its 2014 Trustees Report, even the average 65-year-old can expect to live 20 more years.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
2016 Infiniti QX70 AWD: Fun on all fours. Price: $59,630 as tested ($47,300 base trim level). A technology package added $2,950 to the price, which covered all of the lane-departure and collision-prevention bases. More options are discussed further down. Marketer's pitch: "Intensify the feeling of performance. " Conventional wisdom: Edmunds.com liked the "sporty performance; luxurious interior; abundant standard features; easy-to-use electronics interface; distinctive style" but not the "modest rear passenger and cargo space; restrictive options packages; firm ride.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The new two-story Five Below store on 1529 Chestnut St. marks a milestone for the fastest-growing discount teen retailer in the nation. Its arrival on Chestnut Street - in the old Arcadia Theatre - also continues the corridor's hot streak as a magnet for national retailers, a drastic change from just two years ago. "This is our baby, for sure," said Five Below CEO Joel Anderson, as he took a sweeping glance of the store known for its shock of...
SPORTS
August 3, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Offense is at a premium in baseball. That is why the Phillies could not acquire Joey Gallo or Nomar Mazara from the Texas Rangers in last week's Cole Hamels blockbuster, and why they were never going to get Mookie Betts or Blake Swihart from the Boston Red Sox, Corey Seager from the Los Angeles Dodgers, or Kyle Schwarber from the Chicago Cubs. It's far from a coincidence that 10 of the 12 minor-leaguers the Phillies acquired in their six trades since December are pitchers. In the sport's current landscape, teams are reluctant to part with premium position-player prospects, especially those boasting rarely seen power such as the 21-year-old Gallo.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The morning rain that turned piles of dirt into mud hardly fazed about 300 construction workers who went about their jobs to get Gloucester Township's biggest economic development done in time for an Aug. 13 opening. Simon Property Group, the nation's largest owner of outlet malls, sponsored a hard-hat tour Tuesday to show off the final phase of construction for Gloucester Premium Outlets at Gloucester Township, just off Route 42, Exit 7B. The last 26 of 90 retailers were also unveiled.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like the scene at a mall on the day of a door-buster sale, scores of hopeful job-seekers thronged a job fair Friday in pursuit of work at the new Gloucester Premium Outlets in Blackwood, set to open in August. Before the event at Camden County College in Blackwood began at 10 a.m., hundreds had already shown up. Many brought resum├ęs and a willingness to accept any of the 800 positions available at the 90-store center. "I think it's a positive day," said Precious Jemibewon, 29, of Sicklerville, who has been out of work since a car accident in December.
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