FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 5, 1986 | By Robin Kish, Special to The Inquirer
The Woodbury Heights Board of Education on Tuesday announced a $2,080 increase in the cost of its excess-liability insurance policy and said that it would go shopping for lower rates with the New Jersey School Board Association Insurance Board. But the school board indicated that it did not expect to maintain its $2 million in coverage at the old rate of $800 a year, and that taxpayers ultimately would have to pay more to provide insurance coverage for the staff of Woodbury Heights Elementary School and for the school board.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
The words bold and premium have attained prominent places in autodom's marketing mantra. Wherever you turn, there's an emphasis on bold exteriors and premium interiors. At the moment, Toyota is running a big ad campaign that extols the bold persona of the new Camry. Nissan is underscoring for car writers the more premium nature of the new Murano crossover's cabin. Not to be outdone, Kia keyed on both qualities when it showed its redesigned 2016 Sorento crossover at a recent press introduction.
NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Some people - likely those close to the federal poverty level - will be able to find insurance plans on the Affordable Care Act marketplace that are free. That's because subsidies help cover the costs, and they rise for poorer applicants. As many as 715,000 Pennsylvanians - or more than half of commonwealth residents shopping for insurance on the marketplace - are eligible for subsidies, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation report. But navigators, insurers, and industry analysts are urging people to consider their overall needs carefully before choosing a plan and not to be seduced by the idea of no or very low monthly premiums.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2012 | By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Millions of seniors enrolled in some of the most popular Medicare prescription drug plans face double-digit premium hikes next year if they don't shop for a better deal, says a private firm that analyzes the highly competitive market. Seven of the top 10 prescription plans are raising their premiums by 11 percent to 23 percent, according to a report this week by Avalere Health. It's a reality check on a stream of upbeat Medicare announcements from the Obama administration, all against the backdrop of a hard-fought election.
SPORTS
August 15, 2009 | From Daily News
This is a letter sent yesterday by the Eagles to their suiteholders and premium ticketholders: As you are aware, the Eagles confirmed last evening that we have signed Michael Vick to the team. You are our most valued customers and we understand that this decision may result in some personal soul searching for you, along with some public debate in the coming days and weeks. We do not want this to distract from the relationship we have with you, and we remain fully committed to putting the highest quality product on the field and delivering wins to Eagles fans.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Everyone was asking about premiums in the months before the rollout of the Affordable Care Act. But many people are mistaken if they think the premium represents the bottom-line cost of health insurance. It doesn't. Yes, the premium price is key. But it shouldn't necessarily be the decisive factor when shopping in the new marketplace. To find the real annual cost, add up the out-of-pocket costs, drug selection, and other parts of the drug benefit. "People should not be making decisions to buy a plan based on premiums alone," said Larry Levitt, senior vice president of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a health-policy research and communication group.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
If you're a Pennsylvania resident with Allstate Property & Casualty homeowners insurance, you may face an unpleasant surprise this fall: a sizable boost in your insurance premium. You can just suck it up - as Allstate undoubtedly expects most policyholders to do - or you can use it as a goad to do something you may find nearly as unpleasant: shop around for alternatives. It shouldn't have to be, as I'll explain. But first, a look at what's happening with Allstate. Citing what a spokeswoman calls "an unprecedented year with weather in Pennsylvania," Allstate has asked state officials to approve a plan that would raise premiums an average of 20 percent for the company's 195,000 policyholders - more than twice as steep an increase as sought by any other large insurer during the last six months, according to filings published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2004 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Subaru has long had a reputation in this country for selling rugged all-wheel-drive vehicles popular with outdoors types. Now, the Japanese carmaker's parent, Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd., wants to raise Subaru's image into the realm of premium-car brands - such as Audi, Volvo and Saab - without alienating loyal customers. Industry analysts said Subaru, which has its U.S. headquarters in Cherry Hill, was following a trend among automakers with middle-market brands. The goal is to charge more and increase profitability.
NEWS
July 25, 2014
YOU SAY you'd love premium seats for "The Book of Mormon," the Broadway smasheroo musical comedy that Tuesday begins a seven-week run at the Forrest Theater, but you simply can't swing (or justify) paying hundreds of dollars for a perch near the stage? Well, how does $27 sound? That's right, $27. Total. Heck, that's usually what you fork over for the laughably larcenous "fees" that are usually extorted from live entertainment consumers by ticketing agencies. And, no, they aren't counterfeit.
NEWS
January 30, 1994 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The payment last week of a $5,200 insurance premium is forcing officials here to consider withdrawing a claim with the insurance company that holds the performance bond for the Rolling Brook Farms housing development. Township Solicitor Michael Angelini filed a lawsuit Jan. 19 believing that the premium on the $420,000 performance bond had not been paid. When he learned Wednesday that the First Indemnity Insurance Co. of America in Parsipanny had received the annual payment, he said officials would decide whether to withdraw the claim.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 3, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Offense is at a premium in baseball. That is why the Phillies could not acquire Joey Gallo or Nomar Mazara from the Texas Rangers in last week's Cole Hamels blockbuster, and why they were never going to get Mookie Betts or Blake Swihart from the Boston Red Sox, Corey Seager from the Los Angeles Dodgers, or Kyle Schwarber from the Chicago Cubs. It's far from a coincidence that 10 of the 12 minor-leaguers the Phillies acquired in their six trades since December are pitchers. In the sport's current landscape, teams are reluctant to part with premium position-player prospects, especially those boasting rarely seen power such as the 21-year-old Gallo.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The morning rain that turned piles of dirt into mud hardly fazed about 300 construction workers who went about their jobs to get Gloucester Township's biggest economic development done in time for an Aug. 13 opening. Simon Property Group, the nation's largest owner of outlet malls, sponsored a hard-hat tour Tuesday to show off the final phase of construction for Gloucester Premium Outlets at Gloucester Township, just off Route 42, Exit 7B. The last 26 of 90 retailers were also unveiled.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like the scene at a mall on the day of a door-buster sale, scores of hopeful job-seekers thronged a job fair Friday in pursuit of work at the new Gloucester Premium Outlets in Blackwood, set to open in August. Before the event at Camden County College in Blackwood began at 10 a.m., hundreds had already shown up. Many brought resum├ęs and a willingness to accept any of the 800 positions available at the 90-store center. "I think it's a positive day," said Precious Jemibewon, 29, of Sicklerville, who has been out of work since a car accident in December.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
After two months of trying to get Independence Blue Cross to correct what seemed like a fairly simple problem, Anthony Goldsmith finally ran out of patience. On Feb. 25, the Media psychologist filed a formal complaint with the company for billing him for the wrong plan, denying his claims, and threatening to terminate his health insurance. If anything, Goldsmith's experience with Independence shows that transferring health insurance data, even internally from one plan to another, can be problematic.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Lou Franzini is a patient but persistent man. For most of the last year, the 64-year-old retired banker from Exton has been trying to get the Affordable Care Act website to correct his online account to show that he had coverage in 2014. Yet no matter with whom he speaks or what proof he shows, the error remains. Franzini's proof of insurance is pretty solid: a paid hospital bill to the tune of roughly $500,000. That's what he estimates Independence Blue Cross doled out for his cancer care last year, less, of course, his monthly premium and $6,350 maximum out-of-pocket cost.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Last year, Jimmy and Angela Clark bought Independence Blue Cross' best-selling silver Proactive plan. For the first time in five years, the Germantown couple had health insurance. And they loved it. Having coverage was especially important to Jimmy Clark, 62, who needs blood tests every six months to track high cholesterol. He also needs a colonoscopy every three years - something that, until last year, he pretty much had to forgo. "I got back on [a plan], and colonoscopies are free," said Clark, who got a clean bill of health.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
The words bold and premium have attained prominent places in autodom's marketing mantra. Wherever you turn, there's an emphasis on bold exteriors and premium interiors. At the moment, Toyota is running a big ad campaign that extols the bold persona of the new Camry. Nissan is underscoring for car writers the more premium nature of the new Murano crossover's cabin. Not to be outdone, Kia keyed on both qualities when it showed its redesigned 2016 Sorento crossover at a recent press introduction.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
After five days of window-shopping, the Affordable Care Act marketplace went live Saturday for its second year, sporting a shorter application form and new players, plans, and premium rates. Competition for business is keener this year with UnitedHealthcare and Assurant Health joining ACA veterans Independence Blue Cross and Aetna in the five-county Southeastern Pennsylvania marketplace. UnitedHealthcare also opened for business in New Jersey along with Oscar Health Insurance.
NEWS
October 31, 2014
THIS YEAR, I'm celebrating 23 years of marriage. In addition to the joy of being wed to my best friend, our relationship has economically lifted my life and that of my nuclear and extended family. Being married has netted results that neither of us could have dreamed of coming from low-income households. And so I readily embrace the findings of a new report that makes the case that the retreat from marriage - especially among lower-income Americans, and the resulting change in family structures - is a major factor contributing to the economic inequality in the U.S. It may seem old-fashioned, but marriage matters.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Deborah Fasoline quit smoking. The 57-year-old Bensalem truck driver had tried twice before to stop but failed. This time was different. This time she squashed her lifelong habit like a spent cigarette butt under foot. Fasoline says she has gone seven straight months without lighting up. That's one month more than the Affordable Care Act demands to expunge the up-to-50 percent tobacco surcharge on smokers' monthly premiums. So you can understand why Fasoline can't wait for the marketplace to reopen next month.
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