CollectionsPremium
IN THE NEWS

Premium

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 25, 2014
YOU SAY you'd love premium seats for "The Book of Mormon," the Broadway smasheroo musical comedy that Tuesday begins a seven-week run at the Forrest Theater, but you simply can't swing (or justify) paying hundreds of dollars for a perch near the stage? Well, how does $27 sound? That's right, $27. Total. Heck, that's usually what you fork over for the laughably larcenous "fees" that are usually extorted from live entertainment consumers by ticketing agencies. And, no, they aren't counterfeit.
NEWS
June 5, 1986 | By Robin Kish, Special to The Inquirer
The Woodbury Heights Board of Education on Tuesday announced a $2,080 increase in the cost of its excess-liability insurance policy and said that it would go shopping for lower rates with the New Jersey School Board Association Insurance Board. But the school board indicated that it did not expect to maintain its $2 million in coverage at the old rate of $800 a year, and that taxpayers ultimately would have to pay more to provide insurance coverage for the staff of Woodbury Heights Elementary School and for the school board.
NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Some people - likely those close to the federal poverty level - will be able to find insurance plans on the Affordable Care Act marketplace that are free. That's because subsidies help cover the costs, and they rise for poorer applicants. As many as 715,000 Pennsylvanians - or more than half of commonwealth residents shopping for insurance on the marketplace - are eligible for subsidies, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation report. But navigators, insurers, and industry analysts are urging people to consider their overall needs carefully before choosing a plan and not to be seduced by the idea of no or very low monthly premiums.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Everyone was asking about premiums in the months before the rollout of the Affordable Care Act. But many people are mistaken if they think the premium represents the bottom-line cost of health insurance. It doesn't. Yes, the premium price is key. But it shouldn't necessarily be the decisive factor when shopping in the new marketplace. To find the real annual cost, add up the out-of-pocket costs, drug selection, and other parts of the drug benefit. "People should not be making decisions to buy a plan based on premiums alone," said Larry Levitt, senior vice president of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a health-policy research and communication group.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
If you're a Pennsylvania resident with Allstate Property & Casualty homeowners insurance, you may face an unpleasant surprise this fall: a sizable boost in your insurance premium. You can just suck it up - as Allstate undoubtedly expects most policyholders to do - or you can use it as a goad to do something you may find nearly as unpleasant: shop around for alternatives. It shouldn't have to be, as I'll explain. But first, a look at what's happening with Allstate. Citing what a spokeswoman calls "an unprecedented year with weather in Pennsylvania," Allstate has asked state officials to approve a plan that would raise premiums an average of 20 percent for the company's 195,000 policyholders - more than twice as steep an increase as sought by any other large insurer during the last six months, according to filings published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2012 | By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Millions of seniors enrolled in some of the most popular Medicare prescription drug plans face double-digit premium hikes next year if they don't shop for a better deal, says a private firm that analyzes the highly competitive market. Seven of the top 10 prescription plans are raising their premiums by 11 percent to 23 percent, according to a report this week by Avalere Health. It's a reality check on a stream of upbeat Medicare announcements from the Obama administration, all against the backdrop of a hard-fought election.
SPORTS
August 15, 2009 | From Daily News
This is a letter sent yesterday by the Eagles to their suiteholders and premium ticketholders: As you are aware, the Eagles confirmed last evening that we have signed Michael Vick to the team. You are our most valued customers and we understand that this decision may result in some personal soul searching for you, along with some public debate in the coming days and weeks. We do not want this to distract from the relationship we have with you, and we remain fully committed to putting the highest quality product on the field and delivering wins to Eagles fans.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2004 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Subaru has long had a reputation in this country for selling rugged all-wheel-drive vehicles popular with outdoors types. Now, the Japanese carmaker's parent, Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd., wants to raise Subaru's image into the realm of premium-car brands - such as Audi, Volvo and Saab - without alienating loyal customers. Industry analysts said Subaru, which has its U.S. headquarters in Cherry Hill, was following a trend among automakers with middle-market brands. The goal is to charge more and increase profitability.
SPORTS
April 16, 2011 | By Lou Rabito, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ben Davis, the former Malvern Prep star whose pro baseball career spanned 16 years in the major and minor leagues, and 60 feet, 6 inches of turf and dirt, has retired. The strong-armed catcher was drafted by the San Diego Padres with the second overall pick in 1995, and he played with three major-league teams from 1998 to 2004, batting .237 in 486 games. He was with eight minor-league clubs after that. Davis' hitting woes continued in the minors, and he converted into a pitcher after Baltimore cut him in 2008.
NEWS
January 30, 1994 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The payment last week of a $5,200 insurance premium is forcing officials here to consider withdrawing a claim with the insurance company that holds the performance bond for the Rolling Brook Farms housing development. Township Solicitor Michael Angelini filed a lawsuit Jan. 19 believing that the premium on the $420,000 performance bond had not been paid. When he learned Wednesday that the First Indemnity Insurance Co. of America in Parsipanny had received the annual payment, he said officials would decide whether to withdraw the claim.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 25, 2014
YOU SAY you'd love premium seats for "The Book of Mormon," the Broadway smasheroo musical comedy that Tuesday begins a seven-week run at the Forrest Theater, but you simply can't swing (or justify) paying hundreds of dollars for a perch near the stage? Well, how does $27 sound? That's right, $27. Total. Heck, that's usually what you fork over for the laughably larcenous "fees" that are usually extorted from live entertainment consumers by ticketing agencies. And, no, they aren't counterfeit.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2014 | By Mark V. Pauly, For The Inquirer
The Obama administration has given employers a reprieve from the mandate that they offer their workers insurance at low employee premiums or pay a penalty. The enforcement is postponed until 2016. But should the mandate ever come back? Even strong supporters of the Affordable Care Act are divided. David Blumenthal, of the Commonwealth Fund, says the mandate on employers is needed to compel them to honor their "shared responsibility" to pay their workers' premiums. Tim Jost, a professor at Washington and Lee University and a leading backer and interpreter of the complex ACA rules, says the mandate has too many adverse side effects and should be "repealed and replaced" by something else.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
When it comes to health insurance, Anthony Capone considers himself "on top of this stuff. " So in 2013 when the Mount Laurel businessman turned 65, he pored over Medicare Advantage plans, even visiting a Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield store to talk details. He eventually bought a Horizon no-premium Medicare Advantage plan. He liked the policy so much he persuaded his then-89-year-old mother to ditch her plan and go with Horizon. So in the fall, Capone was primed to renew during open enrollment until he saw that his no-premium insurance had removed the "no. " The 2014 version of the plan came with a monthly premium of $153.70.
NEWS
January 26, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Janice Churchill went to Bright Hope Baptist Church on Martin Luther King Day to proclaim the word. Not the one preached on Sunday. The word about the Affordable Care Act. "I am one of those people who didn't have insurance," said Churchill, 54, a home health aide who had been uninsured for three years until she bought a plan on the ACA marketplace. "It's great, just great that I have insurance. " Churchill was at Bright Hope on Monday to help launch a four-state initiative - in Pennsylvania, Florida, Michigan, and Texas - aimed at increasing ACA awareness in the African American, Latino, and gay, bisexual, and transgender [LGBT]
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tens of thousands of low-income Pennsylvanians would pay higher premiums in 2015 under Gov. Corbett's proposed Medicaid expansion than they would in 2014 for similar policies on the Affordable Care Act exchange. Some health-policy experts are concerned about the disparity, although coverage through Corbett's private-market alternative in most cases would still be cheaper, because there are virtually no out-of-pocket costs. The far bigger issue, they say, is adding any premiums at all, even starting at the proposed $13 for individuals earning as little as $479 a month.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Almost two months after its inglorious rollout, the healthcare.gov website appears to be slowly recuperating. But even if it is 80 percent healed by November's end, as some public statements suggest, it likely won't be the promised seamless shopping experience where consumers can compare plans and prices and see if they qualify for premium and cost-sharing subsidies. Several websites have stepped into the breach and are helping consumers unravel the differences among the various health insurance policies.
NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Some people - likely those close to the federal poverty level - will be able to find insurance plans on the Affordable Care Act marketplace that are free. That's because subsidies help cover the costs, and they rise for poorer applicants. As many as 715,000 Pennsylvanians - or more than half of commonwealth residents shopping for insurance on the marketplace - are eligible for subsidies, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation report. But navigators, insurers, and industry analysts are urging people to consider their overall needs carefully before choosing a plan and not to be seduced by the idea of no or very low monthly premiums.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Everyone was asking about premiums in the months before the rollout of the Affordable Care Act. But many people are mistaken if they think the premium represents the bottom-line cost of health insurance. It doesn't. Yes, the premium price is key. But it shouldn't necessarily be the decisive factor when shopping in the new marketplace. To find the real annual cost, add up the out-of-pocket costs, drug selection, and other parts of the drug benefit. "People should not be making decisions to buy a plan based on premiums alone," said Larry Levitt, senior vice president of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a health-policy research and communication group.
NEWS
September 26, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker and Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Federal officials on Tuesday shared the most detailed information yet on rates consumers can expect to see when the Affordable Care Act's health insurance exchanges go live next week. The average monthly premium for the lowest-cost "bronze" individual plans will be $229 in Pennsylvania (among the lowest in the nation) and $333 in New Jersey (among the highest), according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Tax credits that are expected to apply to most purchasers would substantially lower rates in both states.
NEWS
September 2, 2013 | By Michael Campbell, For The Inquirer
Will low-income Pennsylvanians be tempted to overstate their income to the IRS in order to afford health insurance? The state's rejection of Medicaid expansion for its poorest citizens creates this perverse incentive. The Affordable Care Act was set up to provide free Medicaid to more poor Americans. It also offers premium subsidies on a sliding scale for the uninsured with incomes between 100 percent and 400 percent of the federal poverty level. These subsidies are tax credits the IRS will pay in advance to health insurers for qualifying individuals.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|